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Marine Science

NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 18, 2007
School is quite literally a day at the beach for Costa Mesa High School teacher Cristen Rasmussen’s marine science class. Students spent time Wednesday at Little Corona Beach barefoot with their pants rolled up, wading through the chilly waters of Buck Gully, a small stream that empties into the Pacific. The class measured levels of dangerous chemicals in the water and learned how human actions affect the fragile beach ecosystem. There are squeals as one teen finds a gym sock in the creek, but the real shock comes when students find above-normal levels of phosphate in the water through chemical testing.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | May 16, 2011
COSTA MESA — When Tom Garrison left the Navy, he had to decide between becoming a physician, or a teacher. After teaching marine science at Orange Coast College over 42 years, Garrison is preparing to end his career right where it started without looking back. "I never had any regrets because teaching has been so rewarding and so perfect for me," he said. Garrison, OCC's only faculty member to ever be given the title "distinguished professor," will retire at the end of the month.
NEWS
July 19, 2002
OCC Foundation raises $4.7 million The 2001-02 academic year was the most successful in the history of Orange Coast College's Foundation -- by a whopping margin. The foundation raised a total of $4.7 million in cash and in kind donations between July 2001 and June 2002 -- an increase of 70.8%. Cash donations for the year were up 3.8% over the previous year and the amount of in-kind gifts increased by an impressive 216% over last year's total. OCC's Foundation has total assets valued at more than $10 million.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | October 17, 2008
They played with robots, looked at the planet Jupiter and armadillo skeletons, and even dug for fossils. Thousands of elementary school children descended on OCC for the ninth annual “Community Science Night.” Every year, the school gives out free tickets at schools throughout Newport-Mesa, Huntington Beach, Fountain Valley, Westminster and Garden Grove for kids to have a night of weird science — and maybe even learn a thing or two. In the marine science labs, kids dug their hands into wet sand to dig out hermit crabs or played with sea stars and other creatures in a makeshift touch tank.
NEWS
March 24, 2004
Deirdre Newman Jan Billings is distinctly qualified to contribute to the educational component of Corona del Mar's centennial celebration. She was superintendent of a high school district in Anaheim when it celebrated its centennial celebration in 1998. The experience is proving handy for Billings as the education chair of the neighborhood's centennial celebration, which is from Oct. 14 to 16. She volunteered so she could help facilitate students' understanding of the history of the village.
NEWS
By By Lauren Vane | January 29, 2006
People line the O.C. coast counting the cetaceans for research purposes. OCC teacher started the program.Seated in a foldable beach chair, Linna Bernhard scanned the waters off Newport Pier on Saturday, looking for any signs of dolphins swimming offshore. "You see birds feeding and pretty soon you're going to see some dolphins," Bernhard said. Bernhard wasn't recreationally spotting dolphins, she was counting them for research purposes. Working as a volunteer with the local chapter of the American Cetacean Society, Bernhard counted the dolphins from the Newport Pier as part of the society's Day of the Dolphin.
NEWS
April 18, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BAY -- Just last October, the city's residents welcomed a new interpretive center in the Back Bay. But if a coalition of groups -- including the state's department of fish and game, the city and environmental groups -- have it their way, another marine studies center will open its gates just down the water in 2003, the department of fish and game revealed Tuesday. The 20,000-square-foot building on Shellmaker Island will aim to educate residents about Newport Beach's watershed while serving as a water quality laboratory for the Orange County health care agency at the same time.
NEWS
March 27, 2005
"Everyone knew this day might come," "It's extremely disappointing -- beyond words. It's been tragedy for everyone: Jane Doe, these boys, their families." -- John Barnett, one of the attorneys who defended three young men charged in a gang-rape who were found guilty last week in a second trial. Appeals and a civil case are expected. "We really were looking out for both sides." -- Candace Peter, one of the jurors in the trial of Corona del Mar resident Victoria Hawlish, who was found guilty last week of three charges of attempted lewd acts upon a child.
NEWS
October 29, 1999
Danette Goulet NEWPORT BEACH -- Several Newport Harbor High School students confess they have spent the past months hunting bugs in the protected Back Bay area, but also admit they were told not to do it. "I know a lot of people have gone to the Back Bay -- maybe half [of the students collecting] have gone there, looked and tried to collect," said Natalie Citro, a freshman who admits to snagging a few herself. Citro is one of hundreds of students at Newport Harbor who at the beginning of the school year was given the task of collecting 50 different insects to be studied and labeled.
NEWS
November 18, 2001
June Casagrande The moon and sun dance, intensifying then coyly relaxing their attraction to each other, oblivious to the tiny universes created in their footsteps. Tide pools. Perhaps here more than anywhere else, life appears to be a clear accident of physics, a fluke of wantonly self-serving forces of nature that cause the seas to rise and fall. With them, puddles form in the rocks near the shore. In them live starfish, the very image of their cosmic creators, and urchins, their spikes as electrifying as the gravity that holds their home to the earth.
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