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Legal Costs

NEWS
By Joseph Serna | February 23, 2012
The Orange County Fair Board on Thursday agreed to ask the state attorney general's office to return as its legal counsel. The state's highest-ranking law enforcement arm backed away from the O.C. Fair & Events Center two years ago because of possible conflicts of interest during the proposed fairgrounds sale. The move could save the state-controlled board — the 32nd District Agricultural Assn. — hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal bills in the years to come. The board was slated to sign on for a third year with law firm Manatt, Phelps & Phillips on Thursday before one of the board's newest members, Stan Tkaczyk of Newport Beach, objected to it. The firm's legal costs last year amounted to more than $325,000, with about 40% of that going toward lease issues with Tel Phil Enterprises, operator of the weekend swap meet.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | March 23, 2012
The Costa Mesa Sanitary District board will use taxpayer money instead of its directors' stipends in its attempt to oust a director. Board President Robert Ooten asked his fellow directors Thursday to split the legal costs in the effort to remove Director Jim Fitzpatrick from his elected position, but his peers opted to keep their full stipends. Ooten, however, said he will pay one-fifth of the costs from his $221-a-meeting stipend to move the board majority's case against Fitzpatrick forward.
NEWS
By Al Morelli | February 2, 2012
A pilot would never fly a passenger plane from John Wayne Airport to Sacramento without a flight plan that explains how to get there. Yet all too often, the city government people develop their annual budgets without clear plans of where the Costa Mesa citizens at large want them to go. Thus, to best achieve results, the city of Costa Mesa needs to develop a reliable budget and revenue forecast. A budget doesn't have to be a constrained plan that deprives what the citizens want and need.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | March 26, 2008
Newport Beach has spent almost $250,000 on legal fees since November dealing with drug and alcohol rehabilitation homes in the city, according to billing information obtained by the Daily Pilot. The city also plans to budget about $500,000 next fiscal year to deal with the homes, Assistant City Manager Dave Kiff said. The city’s large legal bills are the result of “a lot of effort and a lot of hours in a very compressed amount of time,” said attorney Jim Markman, who represents Newport Beach in the city’s ongoing battle to curb the spread of rehabilitation homes within the city.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | April 25, 2013
Following the state attorney general's denial again last month to represent the Orange County Fairgrounds, discussions continued Thursday morning regarding the organization's pending legal bills. Since early 2010, the state-owned fairgrounds has paid about $862,000 to Manatt, Phelps and Phillips - a Los Angeles firm with an office in Costa Mesa - since the December 2009 loss of representation by the attorney general, who represents most state agencies. In a March 27 letter, Senior Assistant Attorney General Robert W. Byrne wrote to O.C. Fair & Event Center officials that the office cannot provide counsel to the fairgrounds until the conclusion of the Orange County district attorney's potential investigation into the failed 2010 attempt to sell the Costa Mesa property to private investors.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | January 22, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — After years of fighting lawsuits over Newport Beach's regulations of rehabilitation homes, the city attorney expects to spend almost another $1 million defending the city's position this fiscal year. City Atty. David Hunt will ask the City Council on Tuesday to dip into its reserves to cover his office's outside counsel expenses, most of which have been used to defend against rehab-home operators. The private companies, which operate group homes for those recovering from drug and alcohol addiction, allege that the city has discriminated against their clients.
NEWS
By Jennifer Muir | September 8, 2011
The hypocrisy that has become the hallmark of the Costa Mesa City Council majority was reinforced repeatedly at Tuesday's council meeting. While continuing to cry poor about the city's financial condition, the majority voted to authorize unlimited spending for two high-priced law firms in furtherance of its failed outsourcing scheme. Jones Day, the third firm retained to defend the city against a lawsuit filed by city employees, will charge $495 per hour while HansonBridgett from San Francisco will charge $295 to $325 per hour to advise the city's outsourcing agenda.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | May 2, 2009
In a move an attorney for St. James Anglican Church called “threatening and bullying behavior,” the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles will try to recover attorneys fees and court costs from the church and some of its members who voted to break away from the Episcopal Church in 2004, resulting in a bitter legal battle over St. James’ Via Lido campus. “They are doing this so no one ever dares leave the Episcopal hierarchy ever again,” said attorney Daniel Lula, who represents St. James.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | April 7, 2014
Proponents of allowing medical marijuana businesses to operate in Costa Mesa have taken their case to City Hall in the hopes of bringing the issue before city voters this November. Organizers characterize their ARRO Initiative, or Act to Restrict and Regulate the Operation of Medical Marijuana Businesses, as a "conservative approach" that provides "dignified access" to medical marijuana for users, as allowed by the voter-approved Compassionate Use Act of 1996. Furthermore, it would help clarify discrepancies between California's cannabis law and the federal government's stance on the issue, said the initiative's author, attorney Randall Longwith.
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