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NEWS
January 10, 2003
Deirdre Newman School district officials say they are not daunted by the state's decision to maintain demanding proficiency standards for all students in the face of projections that most schools will not be able to meet these standards by the federal deadline of 2014. Failure to meet the standards could lead to sanctions and the loss of millions of dollars in federal funding. On Thursday, officials in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District commended the state for sticking with more rigorous standards instead of lowering them to increase the prospects of complying with the federal law. State officials announced those plans Wednesday, on the one-year anniversary of the federal No Child Left Behind law. The state's standards were implemented before the No Child Left Behind law took effect.
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NEWS
May 10, 2000
Andrew Glazer COSTA MESA -- A coalition of the city's Latino leaders reinvented itself Tuesday morning. The Latino Advisory Committee, which formed early last fall to represent the city's Latino community as it planned a West Side neighborhood revitalization, will now be known as the Latino Community Network. "We wanted to move away from being issue-oriented," said group member Bill Turpit. "We're now going to focus on being a networking and communication vehicle."
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | January 23, 2008
Adams Elementary School supporters pushed back at critics who said the school is not good enough for their kids. At Tuesday’s Newport-Mesa school board meeting, nearly 30 parents raised their hands in support of Adams, a highly diverse school with rising state and federal test scores almost on par with district averages. The Adams parents were responding to a group of parents calling themselves the Mesa Verde Education Committee, which criticized the school and listed reasons why their children attend other schools.
NEWS
By: | September 25, 2005
For the second time in five years, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District will be investigated because of a complaint about alleged racial discrimination. But it's not a bad thing. In fact, it may turn out to be just the opposite. The complaint the district faces was brought by a familiar name: Mirna Burciaga. It was Burciaga who in 2000 filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, arguing that the district -- at TeWinkle Middle School, in particular, where the latest complaint also focuses -- failed to teach non-English speaking students well enough by focusing too much on English classes at the expense of other subjects.
NEWS
June 6, 2001
Danette Goulet WESTSIDE -- Officials from the California Office of Civil Rights paid a visit to TeWinkle Middle School last week to follow up on a complaint alleging that schools in the district are sabotaging Latino students' educations. In January, Mirna Burciaga of Costa Mesa filed charges with the California Department of Education. She focused on 10 bullet points outlining the Newport-Mesa Unified School District's shortcomings, including one that began: "Students at all sites are often placed on a track for failure."
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | June 18, 2011
COSTA MESA — With her baby next to her in a stroller, Lisa Morris stood on a stool in front of a first-grade class reading a picture book, "Pancakes, Pancakes!" by Eric Carle, about the trials of making the hearty breakfast food on a farm. "This is hard work making pancakes, huh?" she asked the students. Morris was one of nearly 20 volunteers who went into the classroom to read books Friday afternoon for the fourth annual Reading Celebration at Pomona Elementary School. The day was the culmination of a year's worth of reading more than 26,280 books.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | February 15, 2007
COSTA MESA — Newport-Mesa Unified School District board members voted unanimously Tuesday to make changes at three schools facing sanctions under the federal No Child Left Behind Act. In front of a crowd of less than two dozen, board members opted to follow all the recommendations of a seven-member hearing panel that visited the schools in the fall. Supt. Jeffrey Hubbard promised to present an implementation plan at the March 27 board meeting to outline specific ways that the changes will be enacted.
NEWS
November 3, 2002
It may sound trite, but it nevertheless is true: The Newport-Mesa Unified School District has come a long way in the last 10 years. In late 1992, the district was reeling from the disclosure that one of its most trusted employees, Stephen Wagner, had managed to embezzle millions in district money. That his lavish lifestyle -- the fur tuxedo and piece of art are now infamous -- raised no questions seemed painful evidence that the district was being poorly managed and poorly run. No more.
NEWS
July 18, 2002
Deirdre Newman NEWPORT-Mesa -- The school board approved a health center at Rea Elementary School Tuesday night and then decided to bring it back to a full board in August. With two board members absent, the board voted 4-1 to approve the center that would replace the Healthy Start program currently at the Costa Mesa school. The center would serve 6- to 17-year-olds. The center is a joint venture between Children's Hospital of Orange County, St. Joseph's Hospital, UCI Medical Center and Hoag Hospital.
NEWS
December 1, 2001
-- Deirdre Newman Teachers resoundingly approved a tentative agreement last Friday that will boost their salaries by 6% this year and 3% next year. The vote was 943 to 14 in favor of the agreement, said Linda Mook, president of the Newport-Mesa Teachers' Federation. "I'm feeling elated," Mook said. "I think it's a positive step in helping Newport-Mesa attract and retain quality teachers." But before the teachers will see the extra income in their paychecks, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustees has to sign off on the agreement.
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