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By Britney Barnes | September 8, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH - When Effy Sanchez's children were growing up, she didn't speak English well enough to read to them. Instead, she watched her husband introduce them to the world of Dr. Seuss. As the Costa Mesa resident's English improved, she made up for lost time. With "Green Eggs and Ham" in hand, Sanchez, 48, read the book aloud to her 19-year-old daughter. "I'm very happy to read to her," Sanchez said. "It's never too late. " Sanchez, a native Spanish-speaker, was honored Thursday morning by the Newport Beach Public Library Literacy Services' sixth annual International Literacy Day celebration at the Central Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Ellen Goddard | February 23, 2012
"A democratic society in the knowledge age demands that its citizens learn continually, adapt to change readily, and evaluate information critically … U.S. museums and libraries are at the forefront in the movement to create a nation of learners. As stewards of cultural heritage with rich, authentic content they provide learning experiences for everyone. " The above excerpt from the just-released report of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, "Creating a Nation of Learners," makes a strong point of the importance of libraries and museums in the life of a community.
NEWS
March 19, 2004
Marisa O'Neil Local students who are learning English in school are making strides toward fluency, according to a report released Thursday. The state published results from the California English Language Development Test, which measures students' English proficiency. The number of English learners in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District who tested at the advanced or early advanced level increased from 37% last year to 51% this year. "It's good news for Newport-Mesa," said Peggy Anatol, director of curriculum and assessment for the district.
NEWS
November 15, 2001
Deepa Bharath NEWPORT-MESA -- The school district, widely criticized for its inadequate programs for English learners, has already made significant progress in that direction, according to a report released Tuesday. The report, released by Comite de Padres, a unit of the State Department of Education that monitors such programs, praised the Newport-Mesa Unified School District for trying to make improvements but also pinpointed several areas that need more work.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
Deirdre Newman NEWPORT-MESA -- After being brought to task for how it was teaching and assessing English-language learners, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District has finished improving areas found lacking and is now racing to create a comprehensive plan for all its schools. The work is in response to both a state review and a federal investigation that found the district acted inconsistently in its approach to dealing with students whose native language is not English.
NEWS
October 30, 2001
Deirdre Newman NEWPORT-MESA -- Mirna Burciaga doesn't like to give up. Frustrated for two years by what she believed was a lack of attention given to English-language learners at TeWinkle Middle School in Costa Mesa, Burciaga filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights last November. While her own children speak English, Burciaga says she took up the cause for others, and their parents, who don't. Last week, Burciaga's efforts paid off. The office released a report agreeing with her complaints, mainly charging that the Newport-Mesa Unified School District does not fully meet the needs of students with limited English proficiency.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | May 3, 2014
A dual-language charter school for English-language learners on Costa Mesa's Westside could be on the horizon, if Caryn Blanton has her way. Blanton has spent the past decade working as the youth development director for Mika Community Development Corp., which helps residents of heavily Latino neighborhoods in Costa Mesa. During that time, she found that Latino students who don't speak much English struggle at local public schools. As envisioned, the public charter school, to be called the Westside Neighborhood Academy, would serve the Westside's primarily Latino population.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Peters | April 29, 2010
An estimated 23,000 people in the Newport-Mesa area cannot read this article. Yet many in the community will seek help learning to read through the Newport Beach Public Library’s literacy services. In an effort to raise awareness of illiteracy locally and nationwide, authors Sonia Nazario and María Amparo Escandón will speak at the Newport Beach Library Foundation’s third annual Gift of Literacy luncheon today. The event aims to increase the visibility of the literacy program to future participants and supporters.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | February 15, 2007
Debbie Ferguson got a memorable Valentine's gift on Wednesday ? and one that permitted her to help her school. The Adams Elementary School first-grade teacher successfully applied last fall for the Best Buy Teach Award, which provides $2,500 in classroom technology from the retail chain. Winners of the award were invited to apply for a larger one worth $15,000. On Wednesday, representatives from Best Buy stopped at Adams and let Ferguson know that she had won. "It was a great surprise on Valentine's Day," said Ferguson, who has taught at Adams for eight years and coordinates the school's technology programs.
NEWS
October 11, 2001
Exit exam results for high school students were released last week, and the Newport-Mesa Unified School District fared well overall. The district's freshmen, who were the only ones required to take the new exams in March, bested both the county and state averages in the two categories -- English-language arts and math. In English-language arts, about 75% of the students passed the test compared with the county's 71% and the state's 64%. In math, the district's 55% passing rate topped the county marks by 1% and the state's measly 44%. Looking at the general numbers, the district did fantastic by staying ahead of the county and state in both categories.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | May 3, 2014
A dual-language charter school for English-language learners on Costa Mesa's Westside could be on the horizon, if Caryn Blanton has her way. Blanton has spent the past decade working as the youth development director for Mika Community Development Corp., which helps residents of heavily Latino neighborhoods in Costa Mesa. During that time, she found that Latino students who don't speak much English struggle at local public schools. As envisioned, the public charter school, to be called the Westside Neighborhood Academy, would serve the Westside's primarily Latino population.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 15, 2014
A UC Irvine professor will receive an $11-million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to expand a reading and writing program that assists English-language learners in Southern California middle and high schools. Carol Booth Olson, director of the UC Irvine Writing Project, applied for the grant through the Department of Education's Investing in Innovation competition, which celebrates new approaches to improving student achievement, according to a news release. The money will expand the program that Olson and other professors at UCI's School of Education started to provide 72 teachers in the Santa Ana Unified School District with the training needed to assist English-language learners in understanding, interpreting and writing analytical essays.
NEWS
By Jose Solorio and Chris Norby | September 4, 2012
It is natural for students to gripe about the chore of going to school. But for some students fluent in English and stuck in an English-language learner (ELL) program, school can be not only pure drudgery, but also may be a place where they feel left behind. Those were the findings of a legislative hearing we conducted recently in Santa Ana. School board members, administrators, teachers, researchers, parents and former ELL students gathered to finds ways for well-intentioned ELL programs to better recognize when students are ready to pick up the pace and join their fluent friends in mainstream courses.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | April 21, 2012
Parents of students who are learning English - some of whom are also learning the language themselves - said having a superintendent who speaks their language and treats all communities the same are two very important aspects. During Thursday's community input meeting, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District's English Learners Advisory Committee (DELAC) gave its two cents on the district's strengths and weaknesses, and what they want in a new superintendent. "We're looking for the new superintendent to have the same interest in this group," said DELAC co-Chairwoman Maricela Lopez.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Ellen Goddard | February 23, 2012
"A democratic society in the knowledge age demands that its citizens learn continually, adapt to change readily, and evaluate information critically … U.S. museums and libraries are at the forefront in the movement to create a nation of learners. As stewards of cultural heritage with rich, authentic content they provide learning experiences for everyone. " The above excerpt from the just-released report of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, "Creating a Nation of Learners," makes a strong point of the importance of libraries and museums in the life of a community.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | September 8, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH - When Effy Sanchez's children were growing up, she didn't speak English well enough to read to them. Instead, she watched her husband introduce them to the world of Dr. Seuss. As the Costa Mesa resident's English improved, she made up for lost time. With "Green Eggs and Ham" in hand, Sanchez, 48, read the book aloud to her 19-year-old daughter. "I'm very happy to read to her," Sanchez said. "It's never too late. " Sanchez, a native Spanish-speaker, was honored Thursday morning by the Newport Beach Public Library Literacy Services' sixth annual International Literacy Day celebration at the Central Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Peters | April 29, 2010
An estimated 23,000 people in the Newport-Mesa area cannot read this article. Yet many in the community will seek help learning to read through the Newport Beach Public Library’s literacy services. In an effort to raise awareness of illiteracy locally and nationwide, authors Sonia Nazario and María Amparo Escandón will speak at the Newport Beach Library Foundation’s third annual Gift of Literacy luncheon today. The event aims to increase the visibility of the literacy program to future participants and supporters.
FEATURES
By Steve Virgen | March 20, 2010
During a track and field meet about four months ago, an argument ensued at the check-in table for the shot-put event. There was Jaycee Olsen, a Corona del Mar High senior, not budging from her stance. She wanted to compete. But the person at the table did not think Olsen looked like a thrower. The person clarified the area was for throwers, and sprinters checked in at a different table. Olsen didn’t back down. She wanted to throw. The person reiterated. Olsen, once again, said she was there to compete in the shot put. “It’s really cool because I ended up winning,” Olsen said.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | February 15, 2007
Debbie Ferguson got a memorable Valentine's gift on Wednesday ? and one that permitted her to help her school. The Adams Elementary School first-grade teacher successfully applied last fall for the Best Buy Teach Award, which provides $2,500 in classroom technology from the retail chain. Winners of the award were invited to apply for a larger one worth $15,000. On Wednesday, representatives from Best Buy stopped at Adams and let Ferguson know that she had won. "It was a great surprise on Valentine's Day," said Ferguson, who has taught at Adams for eight years and coordinates the school's technology programs.
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