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November 13, 2009
Are you in touch with issues concerning Latinos in the Newport-Mesa area? Are you a dogged researcher? Do you have a flair for writing? The Daily Pilot is seeking a columnist to write about issues affecting Latinos. The right candidate must be a resident of Newport Beach or Costa Mesa. If you’re interested, send clips or a sample column to Editor Brady Rhoades at brady.rhoades@latimes.com or 1375 Sunflower Ave., Costa Mesa, CA 92626. Please include your contact information.
NEWS
November 19, 2010
COSTA MESA — Orange Coast College's theater department will present "Latins Anonymous," a comical look at what it's like sometimes to be Latino in Orange County. The play will be performed at 8 p.m. Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, inside the OCC Drama Lab Theatre, 2701 Fairview Road, Costa Mesa. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Ticket prices for students and seniors are $5 in advance, $7 at the door. OCC staff and faculty will be admitted free of charge.
NEWS
December 6, 2002
Deirdre Newman A survey of Orange County found that Latino and white residents hold dramatically different visions of the region's prosperity, priorities and politics. The Special Survey of Orange County found that Latinos have considerable anxiety about economic opportunities, but are somehow more optimistic than the region as a whole about their own and the county's future. The survey, released Wednesday, is a collaborative effort of the Public Policy Institute of California and the School of Social Ecology at UC Irvine.
NEWS
November 12, 1999
Susan McCormack WEST SIDE -- The Latino Advisory Council is planning several 'living room' meetings next week to give Latinos an opportunity to have their opinions included in the city's West Side revitalization plan. Bill Turpit, a member of the group, said he expects more than 100 residents to participate in the meetings. The group is planning to compile a recommendation to present to the City Council before the draft plan is completed as planned in December.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
HUMBERTO CASPA To get a driver's license, the law requires an applicant to show proof of, among other things, U.S. legal residence, a Social Security number and a home address. Officials at the state Department of Motor Vehicles office in Costa Mesa rigorously follow these state mandates, making it tough on individuals who attempt to get a driving permit through unlawful means. Since our current state laws are already stringent on unlawful drivers, particularly against undocumented workers, then what is the deal surrounding the so-called Real ID, a national standard for citizens to get an identification and driver's license?
NEWS
September 15, 2003
St. Joachim parishioners stage protest of pastor Holding signs in English and Spanish, more than 80 people stood outside of St. Joachim Catholic Church on Sunday to protest the pastor, Rev. Joseph R. Robillard, and his handling of Latinos within the church community. Organizers of the protest of the Costa Mesa church claim that in the past Robillard has referred to the Latino community as "pigs" in Spanish and, two weeks ago, fired four employees of the Vida Familiar, the Family Life group run by the parish, for what they perceive as no real reason.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
Greg Risling COSTA MESA -- A wall that welcomes visitors into the West Side was defaced Monday night with a derogatory comment apparently directed toward the city's growing Latino population. The culprit of the graffiti hasn't been found. In recent months, city officials have taken a proactive approach in dealing with Latino-related issues by hosting a series of workshops on the West Side. Mayor Gary Monahan said the act of vandalism was an attempt to detract some of that attention.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
Danette Goulet COSTA MESA -- Vanguard University played host to a conference Friday that looked at the preliminary findings of a national study that promises to have monumental effects on the Latino community. The small, faith-based school became the venue for the major announcement because of the recent addition of professor Jesse Miranda, director of the new Center for Urban Studies and Ethnic Leadership. Miranda is one of two executive directors of the Hispanic Churches in American Public Life project, which will examine the effect of Catholic, Protestant, Evangelical, Pentecostal and select other religious traditions on the political and civic life of Latinos.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 3, 2014
The way Juana Trejo remembers it, the heavy double doors of Costa Mesa's City Council chambers hit her on the way in. She stood in the doorway. A sea of unfamiliar faces turned to look at her. Some were laughing. It was her first time at City Hall, some seven or eight years ago, she recalled in Spanish on a recent Friday night, and she did not feel welcome. "They said, 'What are you doing here? What do you want?'" she said, describing the response she got from the dais. Community organizer Andrew Hausermann translated for this interview.
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NEWS
By Michael Torres | February 8, 2014
Latinos, who needs them? If you're the Republican Party in California, you do. But there is a big difference among needing, tolerating and identifying with. At the moment, California is a one-party state, big "D" Democrat. The Republican Party is the Yorkshire terrier of California politics. It's there and occasionally barks, but is easily ignored. The Republican Party's solution to irrelevance seems to be pinned on the mythical voting bloc that is Latinos. To keep it simple, let's assume Latinos are a singular group of people, and leave aside the vast geographical diversity of this group and the fact that it is made up of new arrivals and fourth-generation Americans, many of whom love Mexican food but don't speak a word of Spanish.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 12, 2013
A longtime Costa Mesa resident and relative newcomer to the city's political scene announced Tuesday his candidacy for City Council. Lee Ramos, 70, has lived in Costa Mesa for 67 years and witnessed the growth of the city, once known for farming and a small-town vibe. "The city has improved so much," Ramos said in an interview with the Daily Pilot at the First United Methodist Church, where he has attended service for decades. "My vision is to be part of it as we improve. I think the council is on the right track, and improvement is the key. "There was a time when our infrastructure went down.
NEWS
From the Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2013
A former state senator called Monday for an investigation into what she said was a disproportionately large number of Latino students believed to have been victimized by teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Martha Escutia, now an attorney working for a law firm that represents families suing the district over teacher sexual misconduct, called for an independent investigation as she appeared at a news conference with a handful of parents in front of George de la Torre Elementary School in Wilmington.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna and Lauren Williams | July 5, 2012
A Costa Mesa police officer shot at a stolen truck that began ramming his patrol car Thursday morning, authorities said. The shooting occurred about 6:11 a.m. outside the New Harbor Inn, 2205 Harbor Blvd. According to police, an electronic vehicle tracking system in the officer's car alerted him that a stolen car was in the area. When he turned into the southwest portion of the motel's parking lot, he found two men sitting in a reportedly stolen black Nissan pickup truck. The truck backed up, then drove directly into the officer's vehicle twice, Lt. Tim Schennum said in a press release.
NEWS
November 19, 2010
COSTA MESA — Orange Coast College's theater department will present "Latins Anonymous," a comical look at what it's like sometimes to be Latino in Orange County. The play will be performed at 8 p.m. Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, inside the OCC Drama Lab Theatre, 2701 Fairview Road, Costa Mesa. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Ticket prices for students and seniors are $5 in advance, $7 at the door. OCC staff and faculty will be admitted free of charge.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | November 9, 2010
COSTA MESA — A Costa Mesa woman faces nearly 40 years in prison for her alleged role in an identity theft and bank fraud ring linked to an Orange car dealership, prosecutors said Tuesday. Luz Belem Corral, 28, is charged with 77 felonies, including 43 counts of forgery and 31 counts of grand theft as a desk manager at Douglas Nissan. She, along with three men, are accused of using their jobs at the used car dealership to target Latino customers who did not have proper identification or didn't understand the complexities of buying a car to get them inflated loans they couldn't afford to pay. As desk managers from 2005-07, Corral and her accused accomplices had access to dealership customers' financial information.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
COSTA MESA — Phu Nguyen, the Democratic Assembly candidate for the 68th District, is hoping to claim the Latino vote in his opponent's home city of Costa Mesa. Nguyen is meeting with members of the Latino community leaders here on Sunday. The Garden Grove resident is seeking to harness Costa Mesa votes away from their Mayor Allan Mansoor, a Republican, according to a release issued by the Nguyen camp. The event is one of a series of meetings Nguyen has held with the Latino community and others in the district, which is being vacated by state Assemblyman Van Tran (R-Westminster)
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | June 30, 2010
A member of the Legislature's powerful Latino caucus said Wednesday that state lawmakers do not intend on blocking the planned sale of the state-owned Orange County Fairgrounds to Costa Mesa based on the city's controversial stance on illegal immigration. Assemblyman Jose Solorio (D-Santa Ana) of the Latino Legislative Caucus said that he and other lawmakers are disappointed that the City Council declared Costa Mesa a "Rule of Law" city, but want the best deal for taxpayers when it comes to the fairgrounds sale.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | June 24, 2010
A complex deal that would allow Costa Mesa and a private party to purchase the Orange County Fairgrounds from the state would require a $19.2 million up-front payment toward the $96 million purchase price, city officials said. The fee for the 150-acre property would be paid by the city before the close of escrow, but it's also the sum of the first five years of mortgage payments, said City Manager Allan Roeder. "This is basically the down payment," Roeder said. "It's pre-payment of the first five years of debt service."
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