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By Britney Barnes | September 8, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH - When Effy Sanchez's children were growing up, she didn't speak English well enough to read to them. Instead, she watched her husband introduce them to the world of Dr. Seuss. As the Costa Mesa resident's English improved, she made up for lost time. With "Green Eggs and Ham" in hand, Sanchez, 48, read the book aloud to her 19-year-old daughter. "I'm very happy to read to her," Sanchez said. "It's never too late. " Sanchez, a native Spanish-speaker, was honored Thursday morning by the Newport Beach Public Library Literacy Services' sixth annual International Literacy Day celebration at the Central Library.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | August 27, 2011
COSTA MESA — Local families interested in giving their children a multilingual education gathered in Costa Mesa on Saturday for the grand opening of a new private school. Renascence School International celebrated the opening of its second location at 2987 Mesa Verde East with a Chinese lion dance, ribbon-cutting ceremony, tours of the school and a speech by the school's founder Juliann Talkington. "What we're trying to do with this school is prepare kids for this new world, new reality," she said, referring to the global community.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Deirdre Newman OCC CAMPUS -- Some professors at the college are taking issue with language the Coastline Community College District is proposing regarding academic freedom, calling it vague and a threat to their constitutional right to freedom of speech. The topic is a touchy one in the wake of the administration's handling of political science professor Kenneth Hearlson after he was charged with harassing Muslim students during one of his lectures.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | February 21, 2012
Scott Beaver knows the difficulty first-hand of being an openly gay teen, but the deaths of three friends is what spurred him to action. Two committed suicide; a third succumbed to AIDS, the Newport Harbor High School senior said. "That has been the biggest influence on my entire life," Beaver, a 17-year-old Costa Mesa resident, said in an interview Tuesday. "It was terrible, and it's like, I can't let that happen again, especially at Newport Harbor. I mean, it's my school.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
For native speakers, those refreshing rusty skills and others acquiring communication abilities, the Newport Beach Central Library's new Spanish-language materials collection opens a door into another culture. From original text versions of such contemporary classics as Gabriel Garcia Marquez' "Cien Anos de Soledad" ("One Hundred Years of Solitude") and Isabel Allende's "Hija de la Fortuna" ("Daughter of Fortune") to translations of bestsellers by Tom Clancy, Anne Rice, Amy Tan and Patricia Cornwell, the collection features a wide spectrum of adult fiction.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 1, 2013
Here's an insightful observation: People don't like to sound stupid. In fact, that's the No. 1 concern of most of the people who ask me questions about language. Grammar has the uncanny power to make everyone feel like a dimwit in a neon dunce cap. But if you're one of the millions who fear that usage errors make you look dumb, take heart: Our language trips up smart people too. "Proton therapy makes it feasible to just hone in on the actual tumors. " That newspaper excerpt is a direct quotation from someone who, unlike me, knows what proton therapy is — a medical researcher on the cutting edge of cancer science speaking directly to a reporter.
NEWS
By The Rev. Sarah Halverson | June 1, 2012
Just over three months ago, I said "Adiós" to everything that was comfortable and familiar and left home for a sabbatical immersion in Central America. I was on a quest to learn Spanish, but it didn't take me long to figure out this adventure was not going to be easy. That first moment I walked into my Guatemalan home and met my "madre. " I thought she was speaking gibberish! The only thing that was clear to me was this was going to be a long and painful three months! That first night in my small, dark, foreign room I regretted the decision and feared I'd be lost and confused forever.
NEWS
June 16, 2003
Every day. Everyday. Every single day I come across English mistakes made by professional communicators -- business people getting paid to convey ideas effectively and professionally. With the exception of rap musicians, pretty much everyone benefits from speaking and writing well. But for business people -- from the highest-level executive to entry-level support staff -- a good grasp of the language can be critical. For one thing, in business, image is everything.
NEWS
January 26, 2002
Young Chang Theresa Hak Young Cha's retrospective exhibit hangs heavy with a feeling of oppression. There's an eeriness between the walls -- a sense that questions were left only half-explored, a feeling of regret and wistfulness for an immigrant who learned English as a second language, felt displaced most of her life and then was murdered at the age of 31 by a security guard in her building. The collection at UC Irvine's Beall Center for Art and Technology focuses on issues like language, identity, displacement, movement and the pressures of assimilation.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | March 19, 2012
Our culture regularly informs us that it's a big advantage to be bilingual. I accept that. Trilingual? All the better! I, unfortunately, am — and have always been — painfully monolingual. Some would label me monosyllabic. I've never been one for languages. My experience in high school Spanish classes was harrowing. I scraped through by the skin of my teeth. Conjugating a verb was for me like trying to offer a rational exposition on quantum physics — way, way out of my league!
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | May 3, 2014
A dual-language charter school for English-language learners on Costa Mesa's Westside could be on the horizon, if Caryn Blanton has her way. Blanton has spent the past decade working as the youth development director for Mika Community Development Corp., which helps residents of heavily Latino neighborhoods in Costa Mesa. During that time, she found that Latino students who don't speak much English struggle at local public schools. As envisioned, the public charter school, to be called the Westside Neighborhood Academy, would serve the Westside's primarily Latino population.
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NEWS
By the Costa Mesa Pension Oversight Committee | April 21, 2014
Editor's note: Attorneys John Stephens and Tim Sesler, two members of Costa Mesa's Pension Oversight Committee, asked the Daily Pilot to publish the panel's findings and recommendations. The committee put together a series of three articles that seek to explain and simplify the complex subject matter to residents. This is the third installment. At a minimum, pension terminology can be challenging. At a maximum, it is outright confusing. In this installment we attempt to define some of the more commonly used pension terminology.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | February 7, 2014
Q: I'm a member of the United States Power Squadrons, and every year we hold a nonsectarian memorial service in a church for members who died the previous year. The doxology is sung after the offering. This response refers to the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. While I am a Christian, I think this is disrespectful to Jews and other non-Christians attending the service. Wouldn't it be better to use a response that refers simply to "The Lord thy God"? — C., via godsquadquestion@aol.com A: The first question I'd ask you is whether by "nonsectarian" you mean a nonreligious service or an interfaith service.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 23, 2014
The Costa Mesa Charter Committee voted Wednesday evening to support an initiative that would allow the city to outsource most services. Eleven members voted in favor of including outsourcing in the proposed charter, which would require voter approval. The document is expected to go before the City Council for consideration sometime this year and then to voters in November. Committee member Harold Weitzberg dissented; Mary Ann O'Connell was absent. Most of the document's wording was crafted by the group's legal counsel, Yolanda Summerhill, who wrote that any city service can be outsourced unless disallowed by the state Constitution.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 15, 2014
A UC Irvine professor will receive an $11-million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to expand a reading and writing program that assists English-language learners in Southern California middle and high schools. Carol Booth Olson, director of the UC Irvine Writing Project, applied for the grant through the Department of Education's Investing in Innovation competition, which celebrates new approaches to improving student achievement, according to a news release. The money will expand the program that Olson and other professors at UCI's School of Education started to provide 72 teachers in the Santa Ana Unified School District with the training needed to assist English-language learners in understanding, interpreting and writing analytical essays.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | December 31, 2013
Recently, Los Angeles Times columnist Meghan Daum wrote about the word "literally. " It's not OK, she argued, that the Oxford English Dictionary expanded the definition of "literally" to include "informal, used for emphasis while not being literally true. " "If we cave on 'literally,'" Daum wrote, "it will only be a matter of time before we'll be granting equal rights to 'irregardless.'" I like Daum. She's a brilliant writer with a gift for finding fascinating new perspectives on every topic she touches.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | October 16, 2013
New California legislation could cut off some state funding for Costa Mesa based on language the city's Charter Committee has voted to include in a new draft charter. Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 7 into law over the weekend, turning the tables on a local debate over how construction workers should be paid. The legislation allows the state to withhold funds for public works projects executed by cities whose charters include ordinances or provisions that allow contractors to pay other than prevailing wages.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | July 11, 2013
Costa Mesa High will offer Mandarin Chinese classes this fall, the first school in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District to do so. The foreign language classes gained unanimous approval from the school board Tuesday night. Seventh-, eighth- and ninth-graders at Costa Mesa Middle and High schools will be allowed to enroll in one of two sections of the language class this fall, high school Principal Phil D'Agostino said. The two schools share a campus at Mesa. "For the last three years, we've been increasing the level of expectations of students to be taking rigorous foreign language courses," D'Agostino said.
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