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By By Lauren Vane | January 27, 2006
Lynx will meet Lady Washington, tall ship that is the subject of nautical museum exhibit, at harbor entrance Tuesday. For one week, Lynx won't be the only historical tall ship in town. Lady Washington, a replica of an 18th century tall ship, sails into Newport Harbor on Tuesday and will be berthed at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum to host public tours and educational programs for schools. "It's a great reminder of our nautical heritage, not just Newport but nationwide," said David Muller, executive director of the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum.
NEWS
January 14, 2002
June Casagrande A fierce cannon battle is expected to break out in Newport Harbor on Friday -- and Saturday and Sunday. The Hawaiian Chieftan and Lady Washington, two 18th century replica ships, will sail into town Tuesday. And if their reception is anywhere near as enthusiastic as it was last year, the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum will likely be swamped with awed visitors. "It was a really successful visit last year partly because there's such a romance to these ships," said Wayne Eggleston, executive director of the museum.
NEWS
January 30, 2005
NEWPORT BEACH Docked for a tour A familiar sight for movie buffs sailed into Newport Harbor last week. The Lady Washington, a reconstruction of an 18th century sailing vessel, and the Bill of Rights, docked at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum for an eight-day stay that's still afloat. The Lady Washington, for those with good memories, played the role of the HMS Interceptor in "The Pirates of the Caribbean," starring Johnny Depp. Both ships are open for public tours, and school field trips are planned.
NEWS
January 27, 2005
Andrew Edwards History just sailed into Newport Harbor. Two reconstructions of the past -- the Lady Washington and Bill of Rights -- docked alongside the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum on Wednesday for an eight-day stay. During their visit, the ships' crews are scheduled to teach children about life on the high seas and engage each other in old-fashioned naval warfare. Movie fans might recognize the Lady Washington. The two-masted tall ship, based in Aberdeen, Wash.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT HARBOR -- Opening a window in time, two old-time clipper ships sailed into the harbor Tuesday as a reminder of the area's nautical past. Mayor Gary Adams laid out the welcome mat, presenting one of the ships' captains with an honorary key to Newport Beach and a plaque. "I'd like to thank you for including us on your ports of call," Adams said during a brief ceremony. "It's great to have you." The Hawaiian Chieftain and Lady Washington, in the midst of a six-month educational tour of the state's coastline, will be docked behind the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum until Feb. 5. During their stay, the ships and their 53-member crew will enlighten local fourth- and fifth-graders about life on an 18th century sailing vessel.
NEWS
January 13, 2002
HAWAIIAN CHIEFTAIN AND LADY WASHINGTON It's a tradition. The tall ships Hawaiian Chieftain and Lady Washington will once again dock this week near the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum this week as they tour their way along the state's coastline. The Lady Washington is a replica of an American ship that sailed around Cape Horn in the late 1780s. The Hawaiian Chieftain replicates an 18th century square-rigged ship. While they're in town, through Jan. 22, the ships will be open for tours and sails.
NEWS
January 16, 2004
Deepa Bharath Don't be surprised if you see cannons blasting off in Newport Harbor two weeks from now. Don't be surprised either if you see pirates let out battle cries as two tall ships bearing wild buccaneers of yore fight it out in the harbor, normally home to modern pleasure boats and yachts. It will all be part of the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum's Pirates of Newport exhibit, spurred by the phenomenal success of the Hollywood blockbuster "Pirates of the Caribbean."
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | December 27, 2011
Sure, it may seem like a time warp to see a couple of old wooden merchant and naval ships tied up in Newport Harbor this week, but wait until you're aboard. For the next week the public is invited to tour two late 18th-century vessels that will be docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. One, the Lady Washington, is better known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," the first in the Disney movie line. In the film, Capt.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
The two historic tall ships docked in Newport Harbor have extended their stay for another week. Their next scheduled port, Oceanside, has impassable shoals, so the 18th- and 17th-century replicas will remain in Newport until Jan. 11, a representative of the ships announced Thursday. Visitors will be able to sail aboard the Lady Washington, also known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," and the Hawaiian Chieftain during mock battles or "adventure" cruises at 2 p.m. Jan. 7 and 8. Crews in period costume also mill aboard the boats as they are docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. Walk-on tours at the docks do not require a reservation, and have a $3 suggested donation.
NEWS
January 12, 2002
A listing of special events to entertain you through the weekend and beyond. SATURDAY See the marionettes. The Orange County Performing Arts Center's Saturdays at the Center series will present the Cashore Marionettes at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. today at Founders Hall, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. $8. (714) 556-2122. SUNDAY Sundays on the water. The Newport Harbor Nautical Museum will present Gary Miltimore's "Hot Yachts, Ocean Racers From Topsails to Turbos" exhibit of 25 original yacht paintings -- with photographs and models -- through March 15 at 151 E. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2011
SUNDAY Tour d'Orange Classic and vintage car lovers will stage the ninth annual Tour d'Orange, a two-hour cruise of Orange County's best two-lane roads. The event leaves from the corner of Red Hill and Fischer avenues in Costa Mesa and ends at the In-N-Out Burger at The District in Tustin. Arrive by 8 a.m. Maps will be given out to drivers at 8:45 a.m. with a scheduled 9 a.m. departure. XL NYE, Day 2 Costa Mesa-based Sutra rings in the New Year in style with a special show, featuring the biggest names in electronic music.
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NEWS
December 29, 2011
The two historic tall ships docked in Newport Harbor have extended their stay for another week. Their next scheduled port, Oceanside, has impassable shoals, so the 18th- and 17th-century replicas will remain in Newport until Jan. 11, a representative of the ships announced Thursday. Visitors will be able to sail aboard the Lady Washington, also known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," and the Hawaiian Chieftain during mock battles or "adventure" cruises at 2 p.m. Jan. 7 and 8. Crews in period costume also mill aboard the boats as they are docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. Walk-on tours at the docks do not require a reservation, and have a $3 suggested donation.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | December 27, 2011
Sure, it may seem like a time warp to see a couple of old wooden merchant and naval ships tied up in Newport Harbor this week, but wait until you're aboard. For the next week the public is invited to tour two late 18th-century vessels that will be docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. One, the Lady Washington, is better known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," the first in the Disney movie line. In the film, Capt.
FEATURES
By By Lauren Vane | January 27, 2006
Lynx will meet Lady Washington, tall ship that is the subject of nautical museum exhibit, at harbor entrance Tuesday. For one week, Lynx won't be the only historical tall ship in town. Lady Washington, a replica of an 18th century tall ship, sails into Newport Harbor on Tuesday and will be berthed at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum to host public tours and educational programs for schools. "It's a great reminder of our nautical heritage, not just Newport but nationwide," said David Muller, executive director of the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum.
NEWS
January 30, 2005
NEWPORT BEACH Docked for a tour A familiar sight for movie buffs sailed into Newport Harbor last week. The Lady Washington, a reconstruction of an 18th century sailing vessel, and the Bill of Rights, docked at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum for an eight-day stay that's still afloat. The Lady Washington, for those with good memories, played the role of the HMS Interceptor in "The Pirates of the Caribbean," starring Johnny Depp. Both ships are open for public tours, and school field trips are planned.
NEWS
January 27, 2005
Andrew Edwards History just sailed into Newport Harbor. Two reconstructions of the past -- the Lady Washington and Bill of Rights -- docked alongside the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum on Wednesday for an eight-day stay. During their visit, the ships' crews are scheduled to teach children about life on the high seas and engage each other in old-fashioned naval warfare. Movie fans might recognize the Lady Washington. The two-masted tall ship, based in Aberdeen, Wash.
NEWS
January 16, 2004
Deepa Bharath Don't be surprised if you see cannons blasting off in Newport Harbor two weeks from now. Don't be surprised either if you see pirates let out battle cries as two tall ships bearing wild buccaneers of yore fight it out in the harbor, normally home to modern pleasure boats and yachts. It will all be part of the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum's Pirates of Newport exhibit, spurred by the phenomenal success of the Hollywood blockbuster "Pirates of the Caribbean."
NEWS
January 14, 2002
Ahoy. This week, you might hear the roar of cannons off our coast as the 103-foot Hawaiian Chieftain and the 112-foot Lady Washington attempt to outmaneuver each other in a battle reenactment. The two 18th Century replica tall ships will arrive in Newport Harbor on Tuesday and will berth until Jan. 22 at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum's stern-wheeler replica, the Pride of Newport. The ships, on another six-month tour, will host dockside tours as well as educational school outings, reenactment cannon battles and training to be a 18th Century sailor.
NEWS
January 14, 2002
June Casagrande A fierce cannon battle is expected to break out in Newport Harbor on Friday -- and Saturday and Sunday. The Hawaiian Chieftan and Lady Washington, two 18th century replica ships, will sail into town Tuesday. And if their reception is anywhere near as enthusiastic as it was last year, the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum will likely be swamped with awed visitors. "It was a really successful visit last year partly because there's such a romance to these ships," said Wayne Eggleston, executive director of the museum.
NEWS
January 13, 2002
HAWAIIAN CHIEFTAIN AND LADY WASHINGTON It's a tradition. The tall ships Hawaiian Chieftain and Lady Washington will once again dock this week near the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum this week as they tour their way along the state's coastline. The Lady Washington is a replica of an American ship that sailed around Cape Horn in the late 1780s. The Hawaiian Chieftain replicates an 18th century square-rigged ship. While they're in town, through Jan. 22, the ships will be open for tours and sails.
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