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NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 18, 2007
CORONA DEL MAR — Kelp is making a comeback. Pollution from urban runoff and hungry sea urchins helped kill off the once-abundant forests of the long-leafed, greenish-brown sea plant over the last 50 years or so. Now, a project to regrow kelp off the Orange County coast is starting to show results, thanks to marine biologist Nancy Caruso and a team of volunteer divers who plant young kelp and check on it twice a week. "Our theory was that we would increase the diversity and abundance [of sea life]
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | September 1, 2005
Three years of effort to restore kelp along the Orange County coastline has added more than an acre of the brown algae to local waters, according to a recent report. The report, released Tuesday by the California Coastkeeper Alliance, covers kelp reforestation efforts from 2001 to 2004. The alliance coordinates the activities of multiple water-quality groups in the state. The report summarized progress in kelp restoration from San Diego to Santa Barbara.
NEWS
December 10, 2002
Deirdre Newman Newport Harbor High School freshman Natalie Draganza held the skinny, slimy piece of kelp delicately as she dunked it in salt water, cold fresh water and then salt water again. Then she wrapped it in a paper towel to make a "kelp burrito" and plopped it in the refrigerator, where it would stay for the next 24 hours. This process is designed to make kelp reproduce. Draganza and 20 other freshmen in Scott Smith's biology class are part of a larger, community-wide effort to replenish the kelp forest in Crystal Cove State Park.
NEWS
April 11, 2002
The California Coastal Commission gave the go-ahead Tuesday for a local environmental group to begin replanting kelp in the waters off Crystal Cove State Beach. The commission unanimously approved the project at its meeting in Santa Barbara. Orange County CoastKeeper divers are set to begin planting the kelp in May. They'll attach it to tiny, ceramic tiles and place it on the ocean floor. Once the kelp grow to an adult stage, they will be transplanted onto reefs.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | September 9, 2005
Visible just below the surface of the waves, giant kelp swayed in the water as divers went below Thursday for a first-hand look at kelp restoration efforts. Wearing scuba gear, Janet Rappaport and Julia Elizondo dived near Little Corona Beach to observe the results of efforts to regrow kelp along the local coastline. When they returned to the world above, the divers reported that marine life had found a place to stay in the new algae forest. "We were following the kelp down the reef and just checked out the reefs.
NEWS
September 17, 2004
Alicia Robinson Donning wetsuits, fins and in one case a bathing cap, a half-dozen members of Newport Beach's Coastal/Bay Water Quality Advisory Committee plunged into the ocean off Crystal Cove Thursday. Their mission was to check out a kelp-reforestation project undertaken by Orange County CoastKeeper, a Newport Beach water-quality watchdog group. The project, started in 2001, was intended to restore once-abundant kelp forests that have suffered from man-made hazards such as water pollution and also from natural predators.
NEWS
May 26, 2007
Efforts to restore kelp along the Orange County coast can continue for at least three more years thanks to a new partnership between kelp boosters and the Aquarium of the Pacific. Marine biologist Nancy Caruso has worked on kelp reforestation for several years, first with water-quality watchdog Orange County Coastkeeper and since 2005 through the California Coastkeeper Alliance. The program has included education and involving students in growing kelp, which biologists then plant in the ocean off Little Corona, Crystal Cove and elsewhere.
NEWS
April 30, 2003
Christine Carrillo The gaping holes and nonexistent kelp forestry along the coast have served as a platform for educating Orange County students on ecology since September 2001. On Thursday, Orange County CoastKeeper, the organization conducting the kelp reforestation project that includes student education, extended those lessons beyond the classrooms. For the first time, middle and high school students involved in the project culminated their educational lessons with a boat tour of the kelp forest they helped harvest.
NEWS
April 8, 2002
Paul Clinton CRYSTAL COVE -- Staff members of the California Coastal Commission are urging their board to allow a local environmental group to plant kelp seedlings on the ocean floor off the state park in an effort to regrow an underwater forest that has been disappearing since the 1960s. The commission will consider whether to grant Orange County CoastKeeper the permit at its monthly meeting on Tuesday. If approved, the group would be given five years to regrow the kelp forest.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 4, 2005
A $220,000 federal grant announced Wednesday will help bankroll the cost of replanting kelp forests along the Southern California coast, including off Newport Beach. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration awarded the grant to the California Coastkeeper Alliance. The alliance coordinates the activities of several groups that address issues of water quality. Kelp reforestation off Newport Beach started in 2001. Last year, the Orange County Coastkeeper, a water-quality organization, planted kelp in waters near Crystal Cove and Laguna Beach.
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NEWS
By Lauren Williams | April 10, 2012
Corona del Mar may have topped the list of places where radioactive material linked to Fukushima, Japan, was found in kelp, but beachgoers were out in full force Tuesday afternoon, and some seemed unfazed by the findings. The beach activity comes on the heels of a study by Cal State Long Beach professors in which radioactive isotope iodine 131, one of the contaminants released by a Japanese nuclear power plant damaged by last year's earthquake and tsunami, was found in kelp sampled from Laguna Beach to Alaska.
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FEATURES
By Mike Whitehead | October 16, 2008
Ahoy, Boats and islands usually make a good pair, unless your prop is fouled, leaving you to drift ashore onto the rocks. This is what happened when the fishing vessel Sassy, a small commercial lobster boat, was trying to retrieve lobster pots around Santa Barbara Island. Santa Barbara Island is the smallest of the eight Channel Islands at just 1 square mile of land protruding above the water, and it is only 21 miles to the west from Catalina’s west end. Well, luck ran out for the Sassy when a line from a lobster pot became entangled in the vessel’s screw (nautical slang for propeller)
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 18, 2007
CORONA DEL MAR — Kelp is making a comeback. Pollution from urban runoff and hungry sea urchins helped kill off the once-abundant forests of the long-leafed, greenish-brown sea plant over the last 50 years or so. Now, a project to regrow kelp off the Orange County coast is starting to show results, thanks to marine biologist Nancy Caruso and a team of volunteer divers who plant young kelp and check on it twice a week. "Our theory was that we would increase the diversity and abundance [of sea life]
NEWS
May 26, 2007
Efforts to restore kelp along the Orange County coast can continue for at least three more years thanks to a new partnership between kelp boosters and the Aquarium of the Pacific. Marine biologist Nancy Caruso has worked on kelp reforestation for several years, first with water-quality watchdog Orange County Coastkeeper and since 2005 through the California Coastkeeper Alliance. The program has included education and involving students in growing kelp, which biologists then plant in the ocean off Little Corona, Crystal Cove and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | May 19, 2007
The waters off Newport Coast would become an "ocean park" with reefs, a nursery for giant kelp and abalone, and recreation such as sport fishing and diving, under tentative plans from an environmental advocacy group and fishing organization. Orange County Coastkeeper and United Anglers of Southern California are collaborating to study the feasibility of the ocean park idea, which they announced Thursday. "We pretty much want the same thing," said Tom Raftican, president of United Anglers.
FEATURES
By ROBERT GARDNER | June 2, 2006
I took up skin-diving at just the right time. A few years earlier and face masks had not been invented. A few years later, and the kelp was gone. It seems like just a few years ago that a vast kelp patch stretched from Corona del Mar to the end of the cape. To someone who has never experienced it, it is difficult to explain the feeling one had when diving in kelp in the early days. You felt all alone in the world, as if you were the first man to have ever been in that spot.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | September 9, 2005
Visible just below the surface of the waves, giant kelp swayed in the water as divers went below Thursday for a first-hand look at kelp restoration efforts. Wearing scuba gear, Janet Rappaport and Julia Elizondo dived near Little Corona Beach to observe the results of efforts to regrow kelp along the local coastline. When they returned to the world above, the divers reported that marine life had found a place to stay in the new algae forest. "We were following the kelp down the reef and just checked out the reefs.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | September 1, 2005
Three years of effort to restore kelp along the Orange County coastline has added more than an acre of the brown algae to local waters, according to a recent report. The report, released Tuesday by the California Coastkeeper Alliance, covers kelp reforestation efforts from 2001 to 2004. The alliance coordinates the activities of multiple water-quality groups in the state. The report summarized progress in kelp restoration from San Diego to Santa Barbara.
NEWS
By: | August 7, 2005
NEWPORT BEACH Clock tower installed in Corona del Mar The installation of a 24-foot clock tower Thursday brought the Corona del Mar Centennial Foundation one step closer to completing plans for the new Centennial Plaza in the beachside community. The green and bronze edifice was set up near the corner of East Coast Highway and Marguerite Avenue. The completed Centennial Plaza is expected to be open Sept. 25. ENVIRONMENT Environmental group gets kelp-project grant A $220,000 federal grant was announced Wednesday to help environmentalists plant kelp along the coastline.
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