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By JAMES P. GRAY | September 6, 2008
When I completed a draft of this column I forwarded it to several people for their comments, including a local rabbi friend of mine. I want to share his response with you. He said: “I would really like you to talk about the essence of what it is to be a Jew. In ‘Jew,’ J stands for Justice, e for education, and w for worship. Judaism is based on this life and its focus is helping his fellow man. Christianity’s focus is more on the self and of getting to heaven.
NEWS
By MARK MILLER | September 15, 2008
Machiavelli wrote, ?Men are more apt to be mistaken in their generalizations than in their particular observations.? This comment may be aptly applied to Judge James P. Gray?s article on Judaism and Christianity (?Judaism and Christianity,? Sept. 7). Though well-meaning, at least one of his generalizations is erroneous. Gray?s assertion, ?There is no specific dogma or formal set of beliefs that a person must have to be a Jew. To the contrary, it is mostly a religion of ?good acts,?
FEATURES
July 10, 2009
From earliest times, Catholicism was in conflict with Judaism. The idea that Catholicism had superseded Judaism was an essential ingredient of Catholic self-definition. Paul taught that the Mosaic Law was a mere step toward the final messianic perfection of the Incarnation. The early Church was preoccupied with proving the Divine rejection of the Jewish People, as well as the election of the “New Israel.” We see this schema surviving in recent affirmations of the Church’s mandate to make apostates out of Jews.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | October 12, 2012
Question: I'm a hospice nurse, and I often find that my patients of the Jewish faith don't believe in an afterlife. In a recent newspaper article, a rabbi answering the question, "How would you explain death to a preschooler?" made no mention of an afterlife or of meeting God. He said that "at the very worst, death is like a deep, deep sleep. " I can understand when my patients question what comes after death; we all know what we have here, but no one knows for sure what comes next.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | August 2, 2013
Q: When I was young and in Catholic schools half a century ago, we were taught that those who gave their lives for our religion were saints. Do you think those who die for their faith, even suicide bombers, will spend eternity in the presence of God? Stated differently, do you think God would see this as the most fervent way of demonstrating faith? We may think they are wrong, but they think, even more strongly, that we are! — A., via godsquadquestion@aol.com A: Are you seriously asking me if God is pleased with the piety of terrorists?
NEWS
November 8, 2003
Once life support is installed and connected to a patient, then, according to many Muslim scholars, it would be unlawful to disconnect it and cause the death of the patient. However, it is not mandatory to connect the patient to the life support machine in the first place. IMAM MOSTAFA AL-QAZWINI Islamic Educational Center of Orange County Christians consider the primary and greatest "life support" to be God's love expressed through concern and care of family and friends with mutuality from the person whose life may be threatened.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | December 14, 2012
In the spirit of my life work with Fr. Tom Hartman (who sends his love to all even as he enters the deepest fog of Parkinson's disease), I offer my annual Hanukkah greeting for people who don't celebrate Hanukkah. Next week, I'll send along my Christmas prayer for people who don't celebrate Christmas. The point of this spiritual flip-flop is to remind us that even during the holidays that most separate us, we can still find abundant and important meanings that unite us. So here's a sense of what the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah can teach people who have no intention of kindling a menorah this week: One family can make a big difference in the world.
NEWS
September 17, 2002
Deirdre Newman As Americans continue to struggle with the "why" behind last year's terrorist attacks, Jewish Americans in Newport-Mesa turned to their religious leaders with questions about the existence of God during their holiest day of the year on Monday. Across the area, Jews visited local synagogues to reflect on the collective national healing of the past year and uncertainty about the future, and to ask forgiveness for misdeeds in their lives on Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement.
NEWS
June 2, 2000
Claudia Figueroa In Judaism, the cantor leads the congregation in singing or chanting prayers from the Torah. It is a prestigious position that has been part of the religion for hundreds of years--a highly respected role that almost always follows tradition. But things will be very different at 7 p.m. Sunday at Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach, when Cantor Jonathan Grant will add show tunes and jazz standards to the mix. "Cantors Take 4: A Musical Montage," also will include cantors Mark Childs, Stephen Dubov and Evan Kent contributing an even blend of liturgical classics and Broadway showstoppers.
NEWS
July 9, 2005
With the arrival of summer, many will take the opportunity to start reading new books, ranging from lighter fare to serious tomes. Excluding the fundamental text of your faith (the Bible, the Koran, the Torah, etc.), what book has influenced you the most? And (if it isn't the same title), what is your favorite book to read regarding your faith? It is not only the content of the book, but when it is read that is significant. Around the time of my Bar Mitzvah, as I was coming of age Jewishly, I read "Exodus," by Leon Uris.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | October 16, 2013
Experts in Judaism, Christianity and Islam recently discussed the similarities and differences among their religions during an interfaith panel at UC Irvine. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Student Assn. hosted Love for God and for Creation on Oct. 10 to bring together different faiths in an effort to educate the community and further social and spiritual peace, said Minaal Malik, a senior at UCI and member of the association. UCI has seen its share of religious controversy, none of which was present at the event, which was attended by about 50 people.
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NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | August 2, 2013
Q: When I was young and in Catholic schools half a century ago, we were taught that those who gave their lives for our religion were saints. Do you think those who die for their faith, even suicide bombers, will spend eternity in the presence of God? Stated differently, do you think God would see this as the most fervent way of demonstrating faith? We may think they are wrong, but they think, even more strongly, that we are! — A., via godsquadquestion@aol.com A: Are you seriously asking me if God is pleased with the piety of terrorists?
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | December 14, 2012
In the spirit of my life work with Fr. Tom Hartman (who sends his love to all even as he enters the deepest fog of Parkinson's disease), I offer my annual Hanukkah greeting for people who don't celebrate Hanukkah. Next week, I'll send along my Christmas prayer for people who don't celebrate Christmas. The point of this spiritual flip-flop is to remind us that even during the holidays that most separate us, we can still find abundant and important meanings that unite us. So here's a sense of what the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah can teach people who have no intention of kindling a menorah this week: One family can make a big difference in the world.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | October 12, 2012
Question: I'm a hospice nurse, and I often find that my patients of the Jewish faith don't believe in an afterlife. In a recent newspaper article, a rabbi answering the question, "How would you explain death to a preschooler?" made no mention of an afterlife or of meeting God. He said that "at the very worst, death is like a deep, deep sleep. " I can understand when my patients question what comes after death; we all know what we have here, but no one knows for sure what comes next.
FEATURES
October 2, 2009
Hasn’t everyone? For me, journeys of forgiveness begin with choosing non-retaliation, traveling through prayer and understanding, and, ideally, arriving at compassion; the process moves from hostility to hospitality. If I embrace the joy of God’s creativity in place of my own hurt and weakness, then God’s love can make me strong and rich and able to give and forgive. Forgiveness from the heart and mind is difficult, but once done what is shared is the laughter of God. The Very Rev. Canon Peter D. Haynes St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church of Corona del Mar How can one not struggle with forgiveness?
NEWS
By MARK MILLER | September 15, 2008
Machiavelli wrote, ?Men are more apt to be mistaken in their generalizations than in their particular observations.? This comment may be aptly applied to Judge James P. Gray?s article on Judaism and Christianity (?Judaism and Christianity,? Sept. 7). Though well-meaning, at least one of his generalizations is erroneous. Gray?s assertion, ?There is no specific dogma or formal set of beliefs that a person must have to be a Jew. To the contrary, it is mostly a religion of ?good acts,?
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | September 6, 2008
When I completed a draft of this column I forwarded it to several people for their comments, including a local rabbi friend of mine. I want to share his response with you. He said: “I would really like you to talk about the essence of what it is to be a Jew. In ‘Jew,’ J stands for Justice, e for education, and w for worship. Judaism is based on this life and its focus is helping his fellow man. Christianity’s focus is more on the self and of getting to heaven.
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | September 21, 2007
“Story Lady” Lisa Cohen likes to put a Jewish spin on some of her stories. Bunny Foo Foo, for instance, realizes he was wrong to bop the field mice on the head, so he kisses them on the cheek instead. Goldie Locks helps Baby Bear fix his broken chair, and now they have a play date every Tuesday. “That’s a Rosh Hashana story; they realize the error in their ways,” Cohen said. Cohen, whose day job involves entertaining children, is overseeing children’s services for the High Holy Days at the Hyatt Regency in Newport Beach for Chabad Jewish Center this year.
FEATURES
By Michael Miller | October 3, 2006
Every year at Temple Isaiah, hundreds of worshippers honor Yom Kippur by standing on the stage at the front of the synagogue and praying silently. Rabbi Marc Rubenstein, who originated the practice, said he modeled it after the Israelis who pray at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Rubenstein couldn't predict the prayers of all the worshippers in his temple, but after the last few hours of news coverage — centering around the shooting at an Amish school in Pennsylvania — he had a good guess.
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