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NEWS
February 20, 2002
Story by Lolita Harper Women love to shop. And those who have been through devastating life experiences should not be the exception, Joanne Larson said. That is why the Newport Beach resident volunteers her time at Classy Seconds in Costa Mesa. The secondhand clothing store on 17th Street offers affordable clothing to women and children who have been abused. "Battered women have lost enough dignity from the abuse they've suffered without being reduced to sift through bags of donated clothes, trying to find an outfit that is in good enough condition," Larson said.
FEATURES
By By Elia Powers | December 7, 2005
Women Helping Women gives business clothing to those getting back on their feet. `They made me feel beautiful,' recipient says. Eighteen months ago, Santa Ana resident Michelle Howard was unemployed and recovering from a drug addiction. Since then, she said she has undergone a major transformation. She credits her turnaround to services provided by Women Helping Women, a nonprofit organization that offers free business attire, image consulting and an employment search support to low-income women.
NEWS
By John Canalis | July 24, 2013
I walked out of the post office just as a car pulled over in front. A young man, who looked too tall for his tiny blue ride, wiggled out. "Excuse me, sir," he said. Whenever anyone calls me sir I assume they want to sell me cologne from a backpack. I kept walking. "Sir," he tried again. "Do you know how to tie a tie?" That struck me as an odd. I just looked at him. "I pulled over, saying to myself, 'That man looks like he knows how to tie a tie.'" He was right.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | March 5, 2011
COSTA MESA — They don't come more humble than Allan Roeder. City managers typically last four to five years. Then they get canned or they move on. City councils came and went but Roeder survived Costa Mesa's pressure cooker politics for 25 years as city manager. And through that quarter-century until his retirement on Friday, the city manager, who had started his career at City Hall as an intern 37 years ago, never wavered. Somehow he maintained a calmness, steadiness and quiet confidence about him as the city went through cycles of boom and bust.
LOCAL
By STEVE SMITH | May 22, 2007
In 1983, I was the vice president of a successful wholesale company in Los Angeles. Don't let the title fool you — when it got really busy, I was picking orders in the warehouse with the rest of the crew, who were almost all college kids working part-time. As we grew, I had to hire more warehouse help. One of the young men I hired was "Ken," who showed up about as neat in his appearance as a budding warehouse worker can get, short of wearing a tie. Based on his appearance and some other positive characteristics, I hired him. When he showed up for his first day of work a few days later, he was wearing one earring.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | May 24, 2006
My son came home from school two days ago and said: "Well, that was the last Monday of the semester." Thinking that I had lost a few weeks somewhere, I answered: "What?" It turns out that the next two Mondays are Memorial Day and a staff development day. Then, a few days later, school's out. My son wondered, as did I, why a staff development day has been scheduled so late in the semester, but I'm sure there is a good reason. It occurred to me that right about now, many parents are scrambling to find things for their kids to do. Some of them will be in summer camps, some of them in jobs and some of them will just be hanging out. In the days before I was too young to work, summer camp was not an option because my parents simply could not afford it. So my friends and I just hung out, playing any sport that involved a ball of some sort, first in Chicago, then, after I turned 8, in the streets of Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Steve Smith | December 10, 2010
We should all be pleased that last month retail sales rose 6% over November 2009. And we should all be pleased that November's year-over-year apparel sales jumped 9.9%. If a rising tide raises all boats, perhaps it's time to start thinking about breaking out the oars. That will be easier for some of us. Most of us who have jobs and homes and food and clothes have been holding back for the last couple of years, uncertain about whether we're going to be able to provide for ourselves or our families.
NEWS
By Jim de Boom | December 4, 2012
Christmas has inspired great music from many of the world's great composers. So, as angels heralded the first Christmas, the Presbyterian Church of the Covenant will present a program of great selections performed by the choir, the Da Capo Orchestra, soloists, piano and organ beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday. Bach's Third Orchestral Suite opens the program and will be followed by Vivaldi's Gloria in Excelsis Deo, a contemporary cantata and beloved carols — music that will lift your heart with the joy and spirit of Christmas.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | January 28, 2011
Question: I lost my 22-year-old daughter to a possible heroin overdose. I won't have the answers until the medical examiner's office speaks to me in a few weeks. I found her on the floor of her bedroom. A syringe was found in her bed. She'd recently come home from rehab. While she'd only been back a month, I thought we were doing all right. Relapse was always a concern, but I never thought I'd lose her. I spoke to her that morning. She was excited about a job interview and we were getting a Christmas tree that afternoon.
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NEWS
By John Canalis | July 24, 2013
I walked out of the post office just as a car pulled over in front. A young man, who looked too tall for his tiny blue ride, wiggled out. "Excuse me, sir," he said. Whenever anyone calls me sir I assume they want to sell me cologne from a backpack. I kept walking. "Sir," he tried again. "Do you know how to tie a tie?" That struck me as an odd. I just looked at him. "I pulled over, saying to myself, 'That man looks like he knows how to tie a tie.'" He was right.
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NEWS
By Jim de Boom | December 4, 2012
Christmas has inspired great music from many of the world's great composers. So, as angels heralded the first Christmas, the Presbyterian Church of the Covenant will present a program of great selections performed by the choir, the Da Capo Orchestra, soloists, piano and organ beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday. Bach's Third Orchestral Suite opens the program and will be followed by Vivaldi's Gloria in Excelsis Deo, a contemporary cantata and beloved carols — music that will lift your heart with the joy and spirit of Christmas.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | March 5, 2011
COSTA MESA — They don't come more humble than Allan Roeder. City managers typically last four to five years. Then they get canned or they move on. City councils came and went but Roeder survived Costa Mesa's pressure cooker politics for 25 years as city manager. And through that quarter-century until his retirement on Friday, the city manager, who had started his career at City Hall as an intern 37 years ago, never wavered. Somehow he maintained a calmness, steadiness and quiet confidence about him as the city went through cycles of boom and bust.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | January 28, 2011
Question: I lost my 22-year-old daughter to a possible heroin overdose. I won't have the answers until the medical examiner's office speaks to me in a few weeks. I found her on the floor of her bedroom. A syringe was found in her bed. She'd recently come home from rehab. While she'd only been back a month, I thought we were doing all right. Relapse was always a concern, but I never thought I'd lose her. I spoke to her that morning. She was excited about a job interview and we were getting a Christmas tree that afternoon.
NEWS
By Steve Smith | December 10, 2010
We should all be pleased that last month retail sales rose 6% over November 2009. And we should all be pleased that November's year-over-year apparel sales jumped 9.9%. If a rising tide raises all boats, perhaps it's time to start thinking about breaking out the oars. That will be easier for some of us. Most of us who have jobs and homes and food and clothes have been holding back for the last couple of years, uncertain about whether we're going to be able to provide for ourselves or our families.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | December 6, 2010
COSTA MESA — A job interview is all about "selling what's on the inside," but unfortunately that opportunity first requires that a person be suitably dressed, says the leader of a local nonprofit. "Confidence is the secret ingredient," said Jerri Rosen, founder and chief executive of Working Wardrobes, a local nonprofit that offers wardrobe and career development assistance. "Having good clothes for an interview can give the person the confidence they need to really impress an interviewer.
LOCAL
By STEVE SMITH | May 23, 2007
In 1983, I was the vice president of a successful wholesale company in Los Angeles. Don't let the title fool you — when it got really busy, I was picking orders in the warehouse with the rest of the crew, who were almost all college kids working part-time. As we grew, I had to hire more warehouse help. One of the young men I hired was "Ken," who showed up about as neat in his appearance as a budding warehouse worker can get, short of wearing a tie. Based on his appearance and some other positive characteristics, I hired him. When he showed up for his first day of work a few days later, he was wearing one earring.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | May 24, 2006
My son came home from school two days ago and said: "Well, that was the last Monday of the semester." Thinking that I had lost a few weeks somewhere, I answered: "What?" It turns out that the next two Mondays are Memorial Day and a staff development day. Then, a few days later, school's out. My son wondered, as did I, why a staff development day has been scheduled so late in the semester, but I'm sure there is a good reason. It occurred to me that right about now, many parents are scrambling to find things for their kids to do. Some of them will be in summer camps, some of them in jobs and some of them will just be hanging out. In the days before I was too young to work, summer camp was not an option because my parents simply could not afford it. So my friends and I just hung out, playing any sport that involved a ball of some sort, first in Chicago, then, after I turned 8, in the streets of Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By By Elia Powers | December 7, 2005
Women Helping Women gives business clothing to those getting back on their feet. `They made me feel beautiful,' recipient says. Eighteen months ago, Santa Ana resident Michelle Howard was unemployed and recovering from a drug addiction. Since then, she said she has undergone a major transformation. She credits her turnaround to services provided by Women Helping Women, a nonprofit organization that offers free business attire, image consulting and an employment search support to low-income women.
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