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Jack Skinner

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NEWS
March 30, 2005
Andrew Edwards For more than two decades, Newport Beach environmentalists Jack and Nancy Skinner have worked together to keep local waters clean, but their love of the bay goes back even longer. "I became very interested in Newport Bay because we met down here before we were married 50 years ago," Jack Skinner, 73, said. "We met at Little Corona." The Orange County League of Conservation Voters named the Skinners recipients of the group's 2005 Environmental Activist of the Year Award.
NEWS
April 11, 2002
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- When Nancy and Jack Skinner went to the City Council meeting Tuesday to talk about water quality, they didn't expect to see their own names on the agenda. The Skinners, along with Frank and the late Fran Robinson, got a surprise honor when Mayor Tod Ridgeway announced that a fund for dredging the bay would be named after the four legendary local environmentalists. "I can't express what an indispensable resource they have all been in working toward clean water in the Back Bay," Ridgeway said in announcing the decision.
NEWS
April 26, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- Homeowners will hear about sewage, dredging and runoff at a meeting tonight at City Hall. The meeting, held by the West Newport Beach Association, will feature a panel discussion by Deputy City Manager Dave Kiff, water quality advocate Jack Skinner and Orange County Health Care Agency program chief Larry Honeybourne. Kiff said he wants to make sure people have a clear understanding of Newport's dredging plan for the bay. "A lot of people don't know the magnitude of the proposed upper bay dredging," he said.
FEATURES
March 5, 2006
Last week the city of Newport Beach again showed that it is serious when it comes to ensuring the cleanliness and safety of the water in the harbor and off the beaches. By approving the construction of a 13,000-square-foot ocean water quality testing lab and educational facility on Shellmaker Island in the Back Bay, the city has changed "everything on how we deal with water pollution at the beach," noted Newport environmentalist Jack Skinner told the Daily Pilot. Once the Back Bay Science Center is finished, possibly in about a year, tests of water quality ?
NEWS
September 28, 2000
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- Before it sells the city's 1.18% share of the San Joaquin Reservoir, the Newport Beach City Council insisted this week on a binding agreement that the Irvine Ranch Water District will stick by the rules of releasing reclaimed water into the bay. The other six owners of the reservoir have already sold their shares to the water district. At its meeting Tuesday, the council voted to delay a decision on the sale until the city's Environmental Quality Advisory Committee has had time to review a proposal to turn the reservoir into a basin for reclaimed water.
NEWS
July 7, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- A seawater testing program that had been criticized for providing ambiguous data has been modified to address that problem, city officials say, and could begin in less than two weeks. The program is a state-funded, $175,000 effort designed to pinpoint the sources of pollution that flow into the ocean with urban runoff. It had initially focused on trying to match strains of E. coli bacteria collected from local waters against samples of such bacteria from humans, animals and other sources in order to figure out where the contamination came from.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- Frances Robinson, who ardently defended the Back Bay from development with her husband Frank in the early 1970s, has died. She was 82. Robinson died early Saturday morning of heart failure at her Dover Shores home, according to longtime friend and fellow environmentalist Dr. Jack Skinner. She had been in poor health for a long time. "Every time I bicycle around the Back Bay, I say 'Thank God, for the Robinsons,"' Skinner said.
NEWS
December 4, 1999
A JEWEL OF AN IDEA While Carol Jewell's third-grade class at Andersen Elementary School learns how to read and write, they are also learning a language often forgotten: sign language. Through an innovative program, the students write to Danielle Berman -- who has been deaf since birth. This week, 9-year-old Danielle came to visit the class and the kids talked to each other in sign language. We commend Jewell for coming up with the program, which not only helps young people gain a better understanding of the hearing-impaired community but also gives her students another avenue for learning.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
S.J. Cahn BACK BAY -- The city's on-again, off-again, on-again need to beg for money to dredge the Back Bay could be coming to an end. The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday passed legislation that will give Newport Beach $21 million dollars over the next two decades to consistently remove sediment from the bay. "That's excellent," said water quality activist Jack Skinner. "We've been working hard for several years for an endowment on the dredging."
NEWS
September 11, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- A study to develop effective methods of testing the waters of Upper Newport Bay has become a source of disagreement in recent weeks, with some members of the committee that worked on the study arguing that the scientific basis has received insufficient independent review. The Newport Bay Health Risk Assessment Study -- a collaboration between the Irvine Ranch Water District, Orange County, Newport Beach, other cities and the Irvine Co. -- is looking at ways of determining whether bay water contamination poses a threat to humans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By LESLIE DAIGLE | June 4, 2008
This past Saturday, I had the honor of attending the annual meeting of Stop Polluting Our Newport (SPON), a local organization that promotes the protection and preservation of Newport Beach’s environment. Jack Skinner discussed bay sedimentation and Heal the Bay’s annual “Beach Report Card” at the meeting. Heal The Bay, a Santa Monica-based nonprofit, gathers water-quality information from local agencies to assemble a report card. The latest report card presents a yearlong analysis of storm-water runoff, ocean and tributary water quality from May 2007 to April 2008.
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FEATURES
March 5, 2006
Last week the city of Newport Beach again showed that it is serious when it comes to ensuring the cleanliness and safety of the water in the harbor and off the beaches. By approving the construction of a 13,000-square-foot ocean water quality testing lab and educational facility on Shellmaker Island in the Back Bay, the city has changed "everything on how we deal with water pollution at the beach," noted Newport environmentalist Jack Skinner told the Daily Pilot. Once the Back Bay Science Center is finished, possibly in about a year, tests of water quality ?
NEWS
March 30, 2005
Andrew Edwards For more than two decades, Newport Beach environmentalists Jack and Nancy Skinner have worked together to keep local waters clean, but their love of the bay goes back even longer. "I became very interested in Newport Bay because we met down here before we were married 50 years ago," Jack Skinner, 73, said. "We met at Little Corona." The Orange County League of Conservation Voters named the Skinners recipients of the group's 2005 Environmental Activist of the Year Award.
NEWS
April 25, 2002
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- The Orange County Grand Jury has issued a seven-point critique of the Orange County Sanitation District's decision to withhold crucial data about bacterial contamination near the city's shoreline. The grand jury report, announced Wednesday, said sanitation district leaders have "not disclosed the existence of all publicly funded studies." As the basis for its claims, the grand jury cited "The 20 Meter Study," a 1996 report paid for by the district from funds derived mostly by rates passed on to users.
NEWS
April 11, 2002
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- When Nancy and Jack Skinner went to the City Council meeting Tuesday to talk about water quality, they didn't expect to see their own names on the agenda. The Skinners, along with Frank and the late Fran Robinson, got a surprise honor when Mayor Tod Ridgeway announced that a fund for dredging the bay would be named after the four legendary local environmentalists. "I can't express what an indispensable resource they have all been in working toward clean water in the Back Bay," Ridgeway said in announcing the decision.
NEWS
August 18, 2001
NEWPORT BEACH -- Environmentalists and city officials have begun mobilizing against a federal bill that could open the floodgates and allow boaters to dump partially treated sewage into the harbor. The bubbling up of serious concerns about the bill, introduced by Rep. Jim Saxton (R-N.J.), surfaced in City Hall earlier this month. Mayor Gary Adams urged Reps. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach) to oppose the bill in an Aug. 9 letter.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- Frances Robinson, who ardently defended the Back Bay from development with her husband Frank in the early 1970s, has died. She was 82. Robinson died early Saturday morning of heart failure at her Dover Shores home, according to longtime friend and fellow environmentalist Dr. Jack Skinner. She had been in poor health for a long time. "Every time I bicycle around the Back Bay, I say 'Thank God, for the Robinsons,"' Skinner said.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
S.J. Cahn BACK BAY -- The city's on-again, off-again, on-again need to beg for money to dredge the Back Bay could be coming to an end. The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday passed legislation that will give Newport Beach $21 million dollars over the next two decades to consistently remove sediment from the bay. "That's excellent," said water quality activist Jack Skinner. "We've been working hard for several years for an endowment on the dredging."
NEWS
September 28, 2000
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- Before it sells the city's 1.18% share of the San Joaquin Reservoir, the Newport Beach City Council insisted this week on a binding agreement that the Irvine Ranch Water District will stick by the rules of releasing reclaimed water into the bay. The other six owners of the reservoir have already sold their shares to the water district. At its meeting Tuesday, the council voted to delay a decision on the sale until the city's Environmental Quality Advisory Committee has had time to review a proposal to turn the reservoir into a basin for reclaimed water.
NEWS
September 11, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- A study to develop effective methods of testing the waters of Upper Newport Bay has become a source of disagreement in recent weeks, with some members of the committee that worked on the study arguing that the scientific basis has received insufficient independent review. The Newport Bay Health Risk Assessment Study -- a collaboration between the Irvine Ranch Water District, Orange County, Newport Beach, other cities and the Irvine Co. -- is looking at ways of determining whether bay water contamination poses a threat to humans.
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