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NEWS
March 22, 2001
Paul Clinton UPPER NEWPORT BAY -- In response to a request from the Irvine Ranch Water District, Assemblyman John Campbell (R-Irvine) is preparing a bill that would transfer control of the flow of urban runoff into San Diego Creek and Upper Newport Bay to the water district. Still in its infancy, the bill is expected to be ready by the end of the month. "I'm hopeful that this puts one responsible entity in control of making sure that the water flowing into San Diego Creek is as clean as modern technology can make it," Campbell said Monday.
NEWS
January 20, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BAY -- A nonprofit environmental group has sued the Irvine Ranch Water District to block the agency's plan to convert the San Joaquin Reservoir to a reclaimed water facility. Defend the Bay, based in Newport Beach, filed the lawsuit in Orange County Superior Court on Wednesday alleging that the water district failed to complete adequate environmental review of the project prior to a Dec. 18 approval by its board. The lawsuit asks for a temporary restraining order to halt the project until the agency completes an environmental impact report.
NEWS
March 6, 2001
Recently, we have noted the rather proper concern with the insidious pollution of the beaches in the Huntington and Newport beach regions. We now read of official concern about surface runoff from inland and the in-depth studies of aged plumbing systems which appear to be responsible for contaminating the ocean adjacent to these attractive cities. It appears that draconian measures are being seriously considered to ensure that nary a cigarette butt will ever sully the sanctified waters.
NEWS
November 23, 2000
The Assn. of California Water Agencies presented an award to a local water agency at its conference in Anaheim. The Irvine Ranch Water District was given the Theodore Roosevelt Environmental Award for its San Diego Creek Diversion and Natural Treatment System project. The project involved restoration of the San Joaquin Marsh and the direction of water flow from San Diego Creek through the marsh.Water district general manager Paul Jones said the project had helped to reduce summer algae blooms in Newport's Back Bay. The Assn.
NEWS
October 24, 2000
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- Environmental activists said Monday that a previous agreement between the city and the Irvine Ranch Water District to prevent the release of reclaimed water into the Back Bay isn't strong enough to support the sale of the city's share in a reservoir. "For those of use who will stay here, it's unacceptable to have a 10-year plan," said Bob Caustin, the founding director of Defend the Bay. "This does not solve the problem.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | July 3, 2010
Toxicity tests taken this morning should determine when Newport Beach's Little Corona beach, which was closed after Friday's sewage spill, can be reopened to the public, city officials said Saturday. A sewer line broke about three miles inland near Newport Coast Drive and Ridge Park Road on Friday. Thousands of gallons of raw, untreated sewage streamed down Buck Gully toward the ocean, county officials said. The sewage was leaking at about 200 gallons a minute, Shannon Reed, Irvine Ranch Water District spokeswoman, said Friday.
NEWS
June 10, 2003
June Casagrande The long-empty San Joaquin Reservoir will soon be filled with reclaimed water, officials said. The City Council will get an update today from the Irvine Ranch Water District on plans to use the reservoir to store reclaimed water. "One of the big concerns is that, compared to a blue water view, this is pretty poor looking," said Councilman John Heffernan, who requested an update on the district's plan. In summer 2000, the Irvine Ranch Water District proposed using the reservoir, empty since the early 1990s, to store its surplus reclaimed water during the wet winter months, when demand is low. The district sells reclaimed water, which is treated wastewater, for irrigation.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
NEWPORT BEACH The ranger's not a pushover anymore, Yogi The city's two park rangers will now have the power to back up their words when they patrol the city's parks and playing fields. The City Council approved a plan to give the rangers power to issue citations for everything from parking violations to drinking alcohol and graffiti. Residents interested in the nuts and bolts of the Sacramento budget on the city coffers will be able to get the details from city staff.
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NEWS
October 29, 2011
Irvine resident and Irvine Ranch Water District interim General Manager Paul Cook will continue on as the agency's full-time general manager, according to a news release. Cook has served as IRWD's interim general manager since July and was the assistant general manager since 2004. "Paul Cook brings a high level of creative leadership, institutional knowledge and industry expertise that will ensure that our customers will continue to have a reliable and safe water supply at the lowest possible cost," district Board President Steve LaMar said in a prepared statement.
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NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | September 18, 2010
IRVINE — The U.S. Navy did not detect toxins beneath the former El Toro Marine Base's runways and progress is steadily being made on a plume of contamination beneath other sections of the former base, residents were told at last week's City Council meeting. The Navy plans to reevaluate its findings every five years, and if traces of trichloroethylene (TCE), a chemical solvent used on the base in the 1970s, are detected in new areas, the Navy will continue to clean it up, said Jim Callian, Navy Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator for El Toro.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | July 3, 2010
Toxicity tests taken this morning should determine when Newport Beach's Little Corona beach, which was closed after Friday's sewage spill, can be reopened to the public, city officials said Saturday. A sewer line broke about three miles inland near Newport Coast Drive and Ridge Park Road on Friday. Thousands of gallons of raw, untreated sewage streamed down Buck Gully toward the ocean, county officials said. The sewage was leaking at about 200 gallons a minute, Shannon Reed, Irvine Ranch Water District spokeswoman, said Friday.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | December 11, 2009
High levels of a chemical element known to cause deformities in birds have been found in Upper Newport Bay. State water quality officials have ordered Newport Beach, the county, and several cities that sit upstream from the estuary to pay millions of dollars to fix the problem. Preliminary estimates put the cost of taking measures to prevent high levels of selenium from leaching into Upper Newport Bay at $42 million to $137 million. One option for cleanup involves diverting groundwater runoff into the sewer system, instead of letting it flow into the bay. “We’re basically trying to develop some long-term cleanup plans to deal with selenium in the watershed area,” said Kurt Berchtold, assistant executive officer for the Regional Water Quality Control Board.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | December 10, 2009
High levels of a chemical element that has been known to cause deformities in birds have been found in Upper Newport Bay. State water quality officials have ordered Newport Beach, the county, and several cities that sit upstream from the estuary to pay millions of dollars to fix the problem. Preliminary estimates put the cost of taking measures to prevent high levels of the chemical element selenium from leaching into Upper Newport Bay at $42 million to $137 million. The options for cleanup range from diverting groundwater runoff into the sewer system, instead of letting it flow into the bay. “We’re basically trying to develop some long-term cleanup plans to deal with selenium in the watershed area,” said Kurt Berchtold, assistant executive officer for the Regional Water Quality Control Board.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | December 2, 2009
Costa Mesa city staff is working on an ordinance that will require multi-family residences and businesses to conserve water. The ordinance will require new landscaping installations or rehabilitation projects of 2,500 square feet or greater to be water wise, which includes picking drought-tolerant plants and installing irrigation systems that use less water, said Minoo Ashabi, Costa Mesa senior planner. Assembly Bill 1881 was adopted by the state in 2006 to encourage water conservation, and now all California cities must abide the new requirement beginning Jan. 1. “This is intended to encourage drought-tolerant plants in the most conservative way for water conservation,” she said.
FEATURES
By Ron Vanderhoff | June 12, 2009
A quick quiz. How much does a gallon of water cost you? Next question: How many gallons per day does your home use, inside and out? Before reading the rest of this column, go ahead and take your best guess on these two questions. Whatever your answer was to the first question, the price you are now paying is going up. If your bill arrives from the Irvine Ranch Water District, which services all of Newport Coast and parts of Newport Beach and Costa Mesa, water rates will rise July 1. If your water is provided by the Mesa Consolidated Water District or the city of Newport Beach, higher rates are probably on the way. The new benchmark to determine how much water costs is to first establish a “water budget” for each home.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | August 11, 2008
Newport Beach officials are considering a plan that could have consumers paying more or less for water — depending on how good they are at water conservation — if studies support the process and city leaders agree. Places like San Juan Capistrano and the Irvine Ranch Water District have already implemented such plans, but to most water districts, the idea of tiered pricing is new. Tiered pricing is a method of water allocation that aims to motivate consumers to conserve.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | August 10, 2008
Newport Beach officials are considering a plan that could have consumers paying more or less for water — depending on how good they are at water conservation — if studies support the process and city leaders agree. Places like San Juan Capistrano and the Irvine Ranch Water District have already implemented such plans, but to most water districts, the idea of tiered pricing is new. Tiered pricing is a method of water allocation that aims to motivate consumers to conserve.
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