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NEWS
November 28, 2004
Deepa Bharath There could have been many reasons why George Sherrill lived to be 100. But what probably got him through a whole century was his ability to laugh, relax and let go. George was an inventor by profession -- anti-bug shelf paper, suntan lotion and a treatment for genital herpes were some of his inventions -- and he tested hundreds of products during his lifetime. Some he tested on himself and willing friends or neighbors. George was born in Tacoma, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN DEPKO and SUSANNE PEREZ | October 8, 2009
“The Invention of Lying” offers a hilarious look at a world where no one ever tells a lie. The first 30 minutes offers a rapid fire look at how modern society might function with this fact in place. Changes in the way we would work, date and advertise products come in for special attention. Imagine a Pepsi ad saying their soda is just brown sugar water, but begging you to try it anyway. Friends and loved ones saying exactly what they think of you on a daily basis. A secretary saying she didn’t bother to take messages for you because everyone knows you’re getting fired soon.
NEWS
June 4, 2002
Deirdre Newman In coming up with an idea for the science fair, Newport Elementary sixth-grader Eric Holland didn't have to look any further than his own sidewalk. Newport Beach had recently installed new storm drains in front of his house and it didn't take long for the perceptive student to notice all the oil and trash swirling down the drain. "It made him sick," said mom Teri. Eric, an avid sailor and surfer, was concerned about the runoff polluting the bay, one of his favorite recreational spots.
SPORTS
By Matt Szabo | August 18, 2006
Newport Beach sports chiropractor Dr. Tim Brown, also known as the "Beach Doc," still tries to surf every day, even at age 49. He knows the importance of flexibility. In his business, he's trying to stress it to the athletes he works with. Last year, Brown sold the rights to his latest sports performance invention, the S3, to Alignmed, Inc. of Santa Ana. The S3, which stands for spine and scapula stabilizer, is a synthetic shirt worn beneath a uniform or normal clothing to improve posture, reduce pain and speed up injury recovery time.
NEWS
November 15, 2004
Dane Grace Paul Davis understands the precariousness of trying to carry a large take-out food order without spilling soda on himself. It's just such messy mishaps that inspired Davis, the president of Easy Carry LLC., to invent the Easy Carry. The device for packing food was named Foodservice Package of the Year by Quality and Speed for Restaurant Success. The Easy Carry is a fast-food-style cardboard drink carrier with an extra-tall handle that can fit through the middle of a special pizza box or tray to carry concession foods such as hot dogs, French fries or hamburgers.
FEATURES
By Mary Ellen Bowman | May 27, 2007
The Newport Beach Public Library is offering a new database for kids called InfoBits. Designed especially for beginning researchers in kindergarten through fifth grade, the age-appropriate, full-text content is drawn from the best elementary reference sources and magazines covering a wide variety of topics. Kids may choose from graphic-identified subjects, such as geography, plants, animals, invention and technology, transportation, arts and entertainment, science and math, health, people, history or sports.
NEWS
January 6, 2004
ROBERT GARDNER From time to time, I receive a letter from a reader. Most of the time, they are short, just a comment saying they knew somebody I had written about or remembered an event. The exception was a letter I once got from a lady, four single-spaced pages of irate language about something I had written. I felt like I'd gotten the "War and Peace" of letters, which leads to one of my favorite subjects -- brevity in writing. While others may think of the invention of gun powder or the development of the atomic bomb as the most woeful moments in human history, my own choice is the abandonment of the goose quill pen. With the effort it took to write with a quill pen -- all that dipping and blotting -- one thought carefully about each word and wrote with economy.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | October 2, 2007
UC Irvine?s Henry Samueli School of Engineering has received a $2.18 million grant to research a method that would cut the time and cost of sequencing DNA, school officials said Monday. DNA sequencing is a months-long and roughly $5-million process, so any convenient way of mapping the human genome could immediately improve healthcare and a patient?s quality of life, UCI lead researcher and professor Kumar Wickramasinghe said. ?We all have various modifications in our genetic code that make us more susceptible to certain diseases like diabetes,?
NEWS
June 15, 2003
I finally saw one. It was just the other day. I was in my motorcar, on Bayside Drive, heading toward the Isle of Balboa. There it was, on the opposite side of the street, heading toward me -- gliding along without a care, just as advertised. Was it a bird? Was it a plane? Was it a Vespa? No. It was a "Segway. " Ring a bell? Try this: the "Segway Human Transporter. " Still nothing? Come with me now to a time long ago, December 2001. Futurist and inventor Dean Kamen is about to unveil his much touted -- and boy is that an understatement -- Segway Human Transporter on ABC's "Good Morning America.
NEWS
May 3, 2004
DAVID SILVA My mother bought a new car a few months ago. It's one of those sporty economy models that gets great gas mileage and can go from zero to 60 in 10 seconds. But this is just theory, because I've yet to see the thing move. Mom insists she takes the car to work and back -- a round trip of about four miles -- but most of the time it sits in the driveway and looks new. I asked her why she refuses to drive it more, and she said it's because it's so new and beautiful that she's afraid to jinx it. "It's just too good to be true," she says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | December 8, 2012
Say you're an educator and you had an opportunity to save money, do something beneficial for the environment and provide an excellent teaching opportunity for students. It would be a no-brainer, right? So why isn't every school district in California racing to imitate Irvine Unified's successful solar panel project? The answer is that too few school districts are run like IUSD. That is, they lack the vision, flexibility and willingness to experiment, and the entrepreneurial framework.
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NEWS
By Lauren Williams | March 20, 2012
When he's not working as a paramedic for the Orange County Fire Authority, Steve Islava invents devices that prevent physical and emotional injuries. Twenty-five years ago, after delivering a Spanish speaker's baby, he created a handbook of crucial Spanish phrases for English-speaking EMTs and firefighters. Then came an easy-to-use ladder used for escaping a fire-engulfed home. And there was also an inflatable splint. But with his latest creation - a neon-orange toy named Laffy Laffalot - the Newport Beach resident is using a portion of the sales to raise money for cancer research.
NEWS
From LATimes.com | November 19, 2011
Scientists have invented a new material that is so lightweight it can sit atop a fluffy dandelion without crushing the little fuzzy seeds. It's so lightweight, Styrofoam is 100 times heavier. It is so lightweight, in fact, that the research team consisting of scientists at UC Irvine, HRL Laboratories and Caltech say in the peer-reviewed Nov. 18 issue of Science that it is the lightest material on Earth, and no one has asked them to run a correction yet. That's light! The material has been dubbed "ultralight metallic microlattice," and according to a news release sent out by UCI, it consists of 99.99% air thanks to its "microlattice" cellular architecture.
NEWS
By Joanna Clay, joanna.clay@latimes.com | December 18, 2010
Two years ago, Pazit Ben Ezri was having an oh-so-common parental problem. Her baby, Ronnie, would not sleep. And when he wasn't sleeping, he was crying. When mom finally got some sleep, a solution came. "I woke up in the middle of the night with the idea about a bed for him that would be easy to carry," the Irvine resident said. "And then I tried to put my idea together. " The next morning Ben Ezri got to work and unknowingly created her company, Lulyboo , by dreaming up a product, Baby Lounge To Go. She went to the store and bought materials — foam, safety pins and fabric.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | December 7, 2010
Editor's note: This updates how to buy a Laffy Laffalot. ORANGE — Riding in an elevator with firefighter and Newport Beach inventor Steve Islava can be a load of laughs. He doesn't have to say a word. He just pushes a button on his latest creation, Laffy Laffalot, and the children's toy plays one of 20 pre-recorded laughs that can make an elevator full of people smile and even chuckle. The device allows you to record your own message or laugh into the recorder and play it back later.
NEWS
By Steve Smith | November 19, 2010
Editor's note: The central concept of this installment of Steve Smith's column is based on an essay called "B.O.O.K.," which was first shown to him about 10 years ago. The author of the essay was unknown at the time. A decade later, and despite many attempts over the past few days, Smith is still raking his brain trying to find out who wrote "B.O.O.K. " On Nov. 9, the Newport Beach City Council discussed bans on gas and electric-powered leaf blowers and directed city administrators to draft a proposal to regulate them.
NEWS
By Joanna Clay, joanna.clay@latimes.com | August 16, 2010
Since 1892, Hussong's Cantina has been a stop for many travelers heading to Baja California. The family-run Ensenada, Mexico, institution boasts that it invented the first margarita in 1941. The Hussongs, German immigrants, claim they poured the first glass of the tequila drink to Margarita Henkel, the daughter of Germany's ambassador to Mexico. Now, through the ingenuity of a Newport Beach lawyer and his business partner, the iconic bar might find its way to Orange County. Jeffrey Marks, a corporate lawyer who lives in Newport Coast, and his partner, Scott Frost, recently purchased the licensing rights for three of Baja California's most-frequented watering holes: The Giggling Marlin Bar & Grille, Papas & Beer and Hussong's Cantina.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN DEPKO and SUSANNE PEREZ | October 8, 2009
“The Invention of Lying” offers a hilarious look at a world where no one ever tells a lie. The first 30 minutes offers a rapid fire look at how modern society might function with this fact in place. Changes in the way we would work, date and advertise products come in for special attention. Imagine a Pepsi ad saying their soda is just brown sugar water, but begging you to try it anyway. Friends and loved ones saying exactly what they think of you on a daily basis. A secretary saying she didn’t bother to take messages for you because everyone knows you’re getting fired soon.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | July 25, 2009
Hoping to harness the energy of the sea and turn it into electricity, an Orange County blacksmith tested a fantastical contraption called a wave motor at McFadden’s Wharf in 1896. Part-time Santa Ana inventor D.F. Spangler envisioned his wave motor as a “bonanza,” he told the Los Angeles Times in February, 1896. “Mr. Spangler is just a hard-working blacksmith, but he has ideas that indeed seem to be a benefit to mankind,” the Times reported. The contraption consisted of a long lever with a hollow float, connected with two gear wheels to an air compressor.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | October 2, 2007
UC Irvine?s Henry Samueli School of Engineering has received a $2.18 million grant to research a method that would cut the time and cost of sequencing DNA, school officials said Monday. DNA sequencing is a months-long and roughly $5-million process, so any convenient way of mapping the human genome could immediately improve healthcare and a patient?s quality of life, UCI lead researcher and professor Kumar Wickramasinghe said. ?We all have various modifications in our genetic code that make us more susceptible to certain diseases like diabetes,?
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