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Intelligent Design

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NEWS
May 7, 2002
Deirdre Newman NEWPORT-MESA -- For the second time, trustee Wendy Leece has been denied the opportunity to present to her colleagues information about a scientific alternative to evolution. On April 23, the board was set to schedule a study session for Leece to provide fellow trustees with information on intelligent design, a movement that questions Darwinian evolution with research in biochemistry. The Newport-Mesa Unified school board voted 5 to 2 to delay the study session until it receives direction on the issue from the state.
NEWS
January 14, 2002
Deirdre Newman One trustee is continuing her quest to have the district consider scientific alternatives to evolution. On Tuesday, Wendy Leece withheld her stamp of approval from a science textbook called "Life: The Science of Biology." Although the board ultimately approved the book for use in Advanced Placement Biology, the issue will be discussed further during an April 30 study session. Leece took issue with the textbook because it does not include information about intelligent design, which she describes as a movement that questions Darwinian evolution with research in biochemistry.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | May 15, 2006
Intelligent design and evolution advocates, who squared off at UC Irvine last week, found that the chasm between the two theories may not be so great. UCI professors Walter Fitch, Gregory Weiss and Timothy Bradley argued in favor of evolution in nature without supernatural influences. Guest speakers Paul Nelson and Ralph Seelke argued for a designer in nature, although they conceded that minor forms of evolution can occur. "I was surprised and pleased that the other participants arguing for intelligent design felt that the world is 6 billion years old, and that evolution occurred, and that our differences were much narrower than I expected," Bradley said.
NEWS
February 5, 2002
I am writing in response to James E. Young's letter about Trustee Wendy Leece's attempt to add intelligent design to school curriculum (Mailbag, Jan. 29). It is quite obvious that Young has never done any serious study on intelligent design before and is extremely biased. He is using circular thinking in trying to defeat Leece. He states that there is no empirical evidence for intelligent design. Well, how does he know? Evolution requires that life comes from nonlife and lizards turned into birds.
NEWS
June 2, 2005
Rob Yardley I would find the resistance to teaching intelligent design in public school classrooms amusing if the subject wasn't so serious. Why such resistance to such a reasonable hypothesis? In the May 10 Daily Pilot, Mark Gleason wrote: "Evolution is the only creation science backed by a massive body of evidence." Really? Former evolutionist Colin Patterson, in a speech at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, said: "Question is: Can you tell me anything you know about evolution, any one thing, that is true?
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | February 28, 2014
Q: If God created the heavens, the Earth, all creatures and man in seven days, where do the dinosaurs fit in? We know from the fossil record that man and dinosaurs were segregated by millennia.— K., via cyberspace A: I've wanted to write about evolution, creationism and intelligent design for some time, so thank you for your abiding interest in the Bible and dinosaurs that offers me this opportunity. Young-Earth creationists believe that the world was, indeed, created in just seven days some 4,000 to 6,000 years ago. This falls 4.5 billion years short of the actual age of the Earth, and 65 million years short of the actual age of the dinosaurs.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | January 5, 2008
The nation’s leading science organization is taking a firm stance against creationism as a legitimate alternative to evolution, according to a report released Friday by the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine. The report, significantly larger than its predecessors in 1999 and 1984, was headed by UCI evolutionary biologist and former Dominican priest Francisco Ayala. Former UCI Chancellor Ralph Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences. “Despite the overwhelming evidence supporting evolution, opponents have repeatedly tried to introduce nonscientific views into public school science classes through the teaching of various forms of creationism or intelligent design,” according to the report.
NEWS
March 12, 2002
Pilot columnist Joseph N. Bell takes off after Newport-Mesa Unified Trustee Wendy Leece again in his column regarding the teaching of evolution as opposed to intelligent design (The Bell Curve, "Answering the creationist challenge," Feb. 14). He trots out what he perceives to be a big gun to blast away -- a college professor. Hasn't anyone clued in Bell that college professors sacrificed their credibility at the alter of political correctness years ago?
NEWS
May 17, 2005
Don't let all those doubters get you down I think the Kansas schools, along with the rest of the anti-Darwin crowd, are missing the boat. By obsessing on Darwin's theories alone, they are abandoning younger students whose beliefs are being trod on in the early years. I get very discouraged when I hear my 10-year-old daughter talk about being teased by her classmates for her beliefs. I tell her that faith is believing in something when reason tells you not to and don't let all the doubters get you down.
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NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | February 28, 2014
Q: If God created the heavens, the Earth, all creatures and man in seven days, where do the dinosaurs fit in? We know from the fossil record that man and dinosaurs were segregated by millennia.— K., via cyberspace A: I've wanted to write about evolution, creationism and intelligent design for some time, so thank you for your abiding interest in the Bible and dinosaurs that offers me this opportunity. Young-Earth creationists believe that the world was, indeed, created in just seven days some 4,000 to 6,000 years ago. This falls 4.5 billion years short of the actual age of the Earth, and 65 million years short of the actual age of the dinosaurs.
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NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | May 24, 2013
Q: In our newspaper's "letters to the editor" section, we often read letters from people who believe literally what the Bible has to say (creationists, who embrace intelligent design, and readers who reject the theory of evolution). They seem so hidebound in their beliefs that they refuse to even consider the other side of the argument. The truth of evolution is obvious, but it does seem to me there must be a guiding force behind it all. Doesn't it seem obvious that both sides should be considered?
FEATURES
By JOSEPH N. BELL | January 16, 2008
Some of life’s issues that affect all of us in varying degrees are as predictably repetitive as they are seemingly insoluble. The 3-2 votes of the Costa Mesa City Council, for example. The steadily increasing noise over our homes of departing flights from John Wayne Airport. The rising price of parking at Dodger Stadium. And the cyclical debates between science and fundamentalist thinking. We have just experienced the annual visit of two of these latter issues, and we will experience them again.
FEATURES
January 12, 2008
The U.S. National Academy of Sciences recently issued a report arguing that evolution, not creationism, should be taught in public schools. The report’s authors argued that teaching creationism alongside evolution confuses students as to what constitutes science. Do you think creationism — or the theory of “intelligent design,” which argues that biological creatures are so complex they couldn’t have come about through natural processes — should be taught in public schools along with evolution so students can make up their own minds as to which explanation to accept?
NEWS
January 9, 2008
Congratulations to the Wyndham Orange County Hotel and its general manager for acknowledging and supporting gay couples’ rights to civil unions and domestic partnerships. While it may be a smart business decision to provide access for public ceremonies, why does the pastor of Beacon Church need to condemn and trivialize what can be the most important event in many people’s lives? Isn’t passing judgment something only his “god” is supposed to do?
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | January 5, 2008
The nation’s leading science organization is taking a firm stance against creationism as a legitimate alternative to evolution, according to a report released Friday by the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine. The report, significantly larger than its predecessors in 1999 and 1984, was headed by UCI evolutionary biologist and former Dominican priest Francisco Ayala. Former UCI Chancellor Ralph Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences. “Despite the overwhelming evidence supporting evolution, opponents have repeatedly tried to introduce nonscientific views into public school science classes through the teaching of various forms of creationism or intelligent design,” according to the report.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | May 15, 2006
Intelligent design and evolution advocates, who squared off at UC Irvine last week, found that the chasm between the two theories may not be so great. UCI professors Walter Fitch, Gregory Weiss and Timothy Bradley argued in favor of evolution in nature without supernatural influences. Guest speakers Paul Nelson and Ralph Seelke argued for a designer in nature, although they conceded that minor forms of evolution can occur. "I was surprised and pleased that the other participants arguing for intelligent design felt that the world is 6 billion years old, and that evolution occurred, and that our differences were much narrower than I expected," Bradley said.
FEATURES
November 19, 2005
Pat Robertson made news when he said that residents of a Pennsylvanian town had rejected God by voting out of office school board members who supported the teaching of intelligent design. He also warned residents not to be surprised if disaster struck them. How do such statements and the ensuing controversies influence people's faith and their attitude toward religion? Pat Robertson needs to speak less off-the-cuff and use a script writer who has some intelligent design. His on-the-spot commentary without prayerfully considering those comments often get him into trouble.
NEWS
June 2, 2005
Rob Yardley I would find the resistance to teaching intelligent design in public school classrooms amusing if the subject wasn't so serious. Why such resistance to such a reasonable hypothesis? In the May 10 Daily Pilot, Mark Gleason wrote: "Evolution is the only creation science backed by a massive body of evidence." Really? Former evolutionist Colin Patterson, in a speech at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, said: "Question is: Can you tell me anything you know about evolution, any one thing, that is true?
NEWS
May 17, 2005
Don't let all those doubters get you down I think the Kansas schools, along with the rest of the anti-Darwin crowd, are missing the boat. By obsessing on Darwin's theories alone, they are abandoning younger students whose beliefs are being trod on in the early years. I get very discouraged when I hear my 10-year-old daughter talk about being teased by her classmates for her beliefs. I tell her that faith is believing in something when reason tells you not to and don't let all the doubters get you down.
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