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Immigration Laws

LOCAL
By Brianna Bailey | September 27, 2007
The trial involving a 26-year-old man arrested during a City Council meeting in 2006 as he criticized the city's plan to train Costa Mesa police to enforce immigration laws began Thursday and included testimony by Mayor Allan Mansoor, who acknowledged that he is an honorary member of the Minutemen, a pro-immigration reform group. "People give me honors. I simply say, 'Thank you,' " Mansoor said. "They wanted to make me an honorary Minutemen, I simply said, 'Thank you.' I don't participate in any of their activities."
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LOCAL
By By Lauren Vane | December 8, 2005
Anticipating a large crowd, Costa Mesa police staffed Tuesday night's City Council meeting with increased security. The council was considering adopting a plan proposed by Mayor Allen Mansoor to have local police trained to enforce federal immigration laws -- a topic that drew heated debate among residents. With the exception of one man who was escorted out of the meeting by police after he yelled profanities at Mansoor and called him a racist, the meeting went without any major security concerns, said Costa Mesa Police Sgt. Marty Carver.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | September 26, 2009
An undercover police crackdown on people soliciting work on Costa Mesa street corners netted 11 arrests Friday, police said Saturday. Ten of the arrestees also were suspected of violating federal immigration laws, according to arrest records. “We’ve been getting some complaints in the community for a lot of solicitation for work, so we did the operation for that reason,” said Costa Mesa Lt. Bob Cizek. For the operation, Costa Mesa police officers drove around in an undercover car to street corners in the city in search of people violating a municipal code that prohibits soliciting motorists for work on city streets.
NEWS
September 29, 2008
Attorneys on both sides of a federal lawsuit claiming that Costa Mesa officials hindered a Latino activist’s right to free speech when they threw him out of a 2006 City Council meeting had until Monday to file any last motions before trial. Lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union representing Benito Acosta, 27, and from the law offices of Woodruff, Spradlin & Smart, representing Costa Mesa, did not comment if they intended to make any motions Monday, but court records show they were preparing for trial.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | June 15, 2010
Although law enforcement has a new background-check system that examines the immigration status of everyone arrested countywide, authorities still have more ways to catch illegal immigrants, Costa Mesa Mayor Allan Mansoor said Tuesday. "I was supportive and grateful for what [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] did, and I know the public was as well, but there is much more that can be done, and I will be bringing that forward," Mansoor said. In April, Mansoor called a news conference to announce that he wanted local law enforcement and city leaders to look into various ways of beefing up enforcement of federal immigration laws.
FEATURES
April 1, 2006
1. About how many people have ridden on the Balboa Island Ferry during its nearly 90 years of service? A. 1 million B. 1.5 million C. 2 million D. 2.5 million 2. Members of the Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. are planning a trip to Sacramento in May for which reason? A. They want to work out with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger B. They won tickets to the NBA's Sacramento Kings playoff series C. They intend to lobby politicians against a proposal to raise the state's minimum wage D. They are going to cook a meal for Newport-Mesa's state legislators 3. Students walked out of Newport-Mesa schools at the begin- ning of the week to protest what?
NEWS
By By Alicia Robinson | December 7, 2005
Costa Mesa leaders, weighing pros and cons of mayor's proposal, heard heated public comment; no vote by press time.COSTA MESA -- Mayor Allan Mansoor's proposal to train city police to enforce immigration laws could carry costs far beyond the price of the training. The City Council debated the plan Tuesday night but had not voted at press time. A noisy audience offered lengthy comments as the council discussed what has become one of the most controversial issues in recent memory.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | March 8, 2006
A proposed boycott of Costa Mesa businesses seems to be fizzling out before it even begins, as local business owners are distancing themselves from the movement and expressing their disagreement with city policies in other ways. The City Council on December voted, 3-2, to give police federal training to check the immigration status of people arrested on suspicion of felonies. If warranted, suspects could then be turned over to federal immigration authorities. In February, a group of local labor unions and Latino advocacy groups that oppose Costa Mesa's immigration enforcement plan called for a boycott of city businesses and civil disobedience by residents.
NEWS
October 14, 2002
REP. DANA ROHRABACHER: "There's got to be some temperance in his remarks." Schipske said she is bothered by Rohrabacher's outspoken and often controversial public statements. She has criticized the congressman for taking trips to Afghanistan, Qatar and other Middle Eastern countries to meet with Taliban and moujahedeen leaders. FUNDING FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: "We need to commit more resources to public health and communicable diseases." Schipske wants to beef up funding for county hospitals and clinics to eradicate outbreaks of tuberculosis and other diseases.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | October 18, 2007
The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent has become an intriguing figure in Costa Mesa both as a physical presence and a symbol of the racial tension within the city. Since December, the federal agent has taken up residence in Costa Mesa Jail, screening arrestees for citizenship status. Since then, more than 460 people have been flagged for immigration violations. July was the busiest — 59 people were held after being arrested on suspicion of various crimes. Many have protested, claiming some of those detained were arrested for violations as minor as jaywalking.
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