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By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | February 11, 2011
COSTA MESA — Vanguard University began its 90th anniversary celebration in the world of higher education Thursday with a look at what some of its alumni have gone on to accomplish. University officials, alumni and some cupcakes in the Great Commission Hall helped kick off the private Christian school's festivities, which will last 90 days. The event was a chance to show off what Vanguard has done, but it also was a moment for alumni to say thank you for the foundation the school on Fair Drive has given them.
NEWS
August 16, 1999
Recognizing the significance of getting an education, Dr. Arthur G. Coons, of Lido Isle, made it his goal to help every child make something positive of their life. A former president of Occidental College and chairman of the Master Plan Survey Team, which drew the state's plan for higher education, Coons worked tirelessly to set the standards for anyone who wanted to attend college and achieve their goals. Coons, who along with his wife, Edna, moved to Lido Isle in 1965, also worked as a member of the Federal Reserve Board and the Haynes Foundation in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 15, 2000
OCC athletic director Jane Hilgendorf has been selected to participate in the National Institute for Leadership Development "Leaders 2000" program, an international program for educational administrators and faculty members. The 58-year-old Corona del Mar resident will be introduced to the program during a special weeklong institute scheduled for Feb. 27 to March 3 in San Diego. The National Institute is recognized internationally by colleges, universities and businesses for its visionary programs that produce educational leaders who effectively challenge assumptions, eliminate barriers and create new pathways to successful solutions.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
A UC Irvine professor of public health was recognized in England this week by international education groups for his leadership in making the university's courses and course materials free and public. Professor Oladele Ogunseitan, the founding chairman of the department of population health and disease prevention at UCI, was honored with the OpenCourseWare Leadership Excellence Award by the OpenCourseWare Consortium for increasing the status of the university's free and open education site, according to a news release.
NEWS
September 6, 2004
City planners to hold open house The city of Costa Mesa's Planning Division will be holding an Open House on Oct. 4 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Community members are invited to visit the Open House to learn about new resources available to them, and to meet the city's planning commissioners and staff. The Planning Division is on the second floor of City Hall at 77 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, call Senior Planner Kimberly Brandt at (714)
NEWS
September 6, 2011
Sage Hill School was awarded almost $74,000 in a grant to expand its campus garden. State Farm is giving the Newport Coast private school money for its Organic Educational Center, a project that focuses on environmental responsibility. Sage Hill's organic garden was created through a service learning project by six of the school's students and Savannah's Organic Ranch, an Aliso Viejo-based nonprofit that educates children about organic gardening. The students spent a school year planning out the project before more than 100 volunteers brought the garden to life over three weekends in April.
NEWS
May 16, 2004
Who needs a chancellor, anyway? The question posed in the May 11 Daily Pilot, "What is a chancellor and what do they do?" sought to identify the role and responsibilities of this somewhat exalted position and, in the process, seek to provide something resembling justification for the jump in his salary along with his three vice-chancellor assistants. This did not happen. It's most pertinent to recall that, a little over five years ago, the California Citizens Commission on Higher Education saw fit to recommend the elimination of the chancellors of the 72 community college districts in California, along with 72 district boards.
NEWS
July 14, 2004
Marisa O'Neil After of year of doing without, Coast Community College District has hired a new vice chancellor for human resources. Joseph Quarles, formerly deputy superintendent and chief of staff for the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District, took the position on July 1. He replaced John Renley, who retired in August of last year but stayed on to work a couple days a week. Quarles, 56, served as the top human resources officer with the kindergarten through 12th-grade school district since 1992.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
It is with deep sorrow, the family of Alan Langston announces his passing at the age of 57 on December 28, 2012.  He will be greatly missed by his family and many friends.  He is survived by his mother, Beverly Langston, sister Catherine Langston Chamberlin, and nieces, Jillian and Perrin Chamberlin. Alan was born in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina on April 11, 1955.  At age four, his family moved to Southern California, where he remained the rest of his life.  He began his childhood education in  Costa Mesa and graduated from Costa Mesa High School as president of the Senior class.  Alan went on to higher education and graduated from USC.  He was a member of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity.  At an early age, he was anxious to learn to swim and do water related activities.  He loved snorkeling, body surfing, and surfboarding.  In high school, he was on the swim and water polo teams, continuing to play water polo throughout college.  After college, he added mountain biking to his routine and continued surfing and biking until shortly before his death.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | February 18, 2010
A California assemblyman who wants to levy a tax on the state’s oil drillers appeared Thursday at Orange Coast College, pitching his bill to a group of student senators and pointing out that California pays $2 billion more a year on prisons than higher education. The Assembly’s majority leader, Alberto Torrico (D-Fremont), urged the senators to take part in the campaign to raise fees on California’s oil industry, a move that could raise as much as $2 billion a year, nearly a half-million of which would be earmarked for community colleges statewide.
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | March 6, 2013
As it develops a plan for long-term survival, a school district program that teaches high school students college-level classes is accepting applications for the next school year. Early College High School announced the call for students Tuesday and posted the application at earlycollege.nmusd.us . A short-term contract that kept the school running expires this summer, but the program will continue operating in 2013-14, according to Newport-Mesa Unified. Early College exists by partnering with a college to teach courses at its Mesa Verde campus.
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NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 22, 2013
There are a lot of people out there who will think less of you if you use "impact" as a verb: A longer storm season will negatively impact tourism. Failure to study will negatively impact your grades. Technology will impact higher education. Those are wrong, wrong and wrong, according to certain people. Because they only recognize impact as a noun, some people would require you to say instead that a longer storm season will have a negative impact on tourism, failure to study will have a negative impact on your grades, technology will have an impact on higher education.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | February 5, 2013
About 250,000 students signed up for seven classes UC Irvine is offering online for free this semester, Larry Cooperman, the director of OpenCourseWare at the university, said. They'll all be allowed to attend. Those students will become data in a years-long experiment UCI and a consortium of other universities is conducting that proponents believe could shift the frontier of education. "If you take education and turn it from a privilege to a basic human right, it means that anyone who has the skill and the motivation can basically learn something that can make a better life for themselves and their family," Stanford professor Daphne Koller said at UCI this week.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
It is with deep sorrow, the family of Alan Langston announces his passing at the age of 57 on December 28, 2012.  He will be greatly missed by his family and many friends.  He is survived by his mother, Beverly Langston, sister Catherine Langston Chamberlin, and nieces, Jillian and Perrin Chamberlin. Alan was born in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina on April 11, 1955.  At age four, his family moved to Southern California, where he remained the rest of his life.  He began his childhood education in  Costa Mesa and graduated from Costa Mesa High School as president of the Senior class.  Alan went on to higher education and graduated from USC.  He was a member of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity.  At an early age, he was anxious to learn to swim and do water related activities.  He loved snorkeling, body surfing, and surfboarding.  In high school, he was on the swim and water polo teams, continuing to play water polo throughout college.  After college, he added mountain biking to his routine and continued surfing and biking until shortly before his death.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | October 6, 2012
Have you ever been in a building when a fire alarm sounds, and everyone pauses and looks around, not wanting to make the first move or appear the panicked fool who rushes to the exit first? Probably just a false alarm; that's usually the case, we think. And so we hesitate and weigh the risks of hurriedly leaving our comfortable seats and looking uncool in the process versus the very real possibility that the whole blasted place is about to burn to the ground. That's where we are with public education in California.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
A UC Irvine professor of public health was recognized in England this week by international education groups for his leadership in making the university's courses and course materials free and public. Professor Oladele Ogunseitan, the founding chairman of the department of population health and disease prevention at UCI, was honored with the OpenCourseWare Leadership Excellence Award by the OpenCourseWare Consortium for increasing the status of the university's free and open education site, according to a news release.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
Sage Hill School was awarded almost $74,000 in a grant to expand its campus garden. State Farm is giving the Newport Coast private school money for its Organic Educational Center, a project that focuses on environmental responsibility. Sage Hill's organic garden was created through a service learning project by six of the school's students and Savannah's Organic Ranch, an Aliso Viejo-based nonprofit that educates children about organic gardening. The students spent a school year planning out the project before more than 100 volunteers brought the garden to life over three weekends in April.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | February 11, 2011
COSTA MESA — Vanguard University began its 90th anniversary celebration in the world of higher education Thursday with a look at what some of its alumni have gone on to accomplish. University officials, alumni and some cupcakes in the Great Commission Hall helped kick off the private Christian school's festivities, which will last 90 days. The event was a chance to show off what Vanguard has done, but it also was a moment for alumni to say thank you for the foundation the school on Fair Drive has given them.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | February 18, 2010
A California assemblyman who wants to levy a tax on the state’s oil drillers appeared Thursday at Orange Coast College, pitching his bill to a group of student senators and pointing out that California pays $2 billion more a year on prisons than higher education. The Assembly’s majority leader, Alberto Torrico (D-Fremont), urged the senators to take part in the campaign to raise fees on California’s oil industry, a move that could raise as much as $2 billion a year, nearly a half-million of which would be earmarked for community colleges statewide.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | January 27, 2010
If you’re a Japanese American who was sent off to an internment camp while World War II played out, you could now qualify for an honorary degree from a state university or University of California campus, and any of the community colleges in California, including Orange Coast College and UC Irvine. The special program is part of a state Assembly bill signed into law last fall by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. The monumental task of finding some of these former prisoners, many of whom are in their 80s and 90s, is beginning to take shape statewide.
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