Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsHigh Holy Days
IN THE NEWS

High Holy Days

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013
Jewish communities in Newport Beach are preparing to celebrate the High Holy Days next week. Temple Isaiah, which shares facilities with Harbor Christian Church at 2401 Irvine Ave., invites anyone interested to attend Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services, beginning the eve of Rosh Hashana, at 8 p.m. Wednesday. Rosh Hashana services will also be held at the temple Sept. 5 and 6, followed by Yom Kippur services Sept. 13 and 14. All will apply a modern approach to traditional prayer, according to a news release.
NEWS
September 30, 2000
Young Chang Children from Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach will send helium balloons with paper promises tucked inside up to the heavens Sunday. The promises, their Jewish New Year's resolutions, include "I will be kind to pets," "I will not steal" and "I will be a better person." All week, the children have been working on the project, which is their way of starting off fresh, Rabbi Marc Rubenstein said. Adults will do the same this Rosh Hashana, which means "head of the year," by taking stock of who they've been and who they want to be. The celebration marks the beginning of High Holy Days, which includes Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, starting at sundown Oct. 8. "It's a time of introspection," said Selma Sladek, director of arts and culture for the Jewish Community Center in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 4, 2005
When the sound of the shofar reverberates through the synagogue today, it's time to ring in the year 5766. Rosh Hashana, the holiday that signifies the start of the Jewish New Year, began Monday night and continues today with services and the traditional blowing of the ram's horn, called the shofar. The High Holy Days are the most important time on the Jewish calendar. They include Rosh Hashana and the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, which is Oct. 12. It's a time of quiet introspection, when Jews across the world contemplate the past year and atone for their sins.
NEWS
September 18, 1999
The Jewish holy day of Yom Kippur begins at sundown Sunday, and local Jewish organizations are preparing to host their largest crowds of the year. The special events connected with Yom Kippur include a full day of services Monday, the Sunday-night singing of Kol Nidre, a prayer that addresses the failure to fulfill vows, and the saying of Yizkor, the prayer for the dead. The day attracts many Jews who do not attend services at other times, said Rabbi David Rosenberg of Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach.
NEWS
September 11, 1999
Amy R. Spurgeon NEWPORT MESA -- Hundreds of Jewish families gathered at sundown Friday to observe the beginning of Rosh Hashana -- the Jewish holiday that marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year. The 10 days that follow are called the Days of Awe and Jews around the world will spend time focusing on repentance, judgment and atonement. The High Holy Days are considered the second major cycle of festivals in the Jewish year and will end Sept. 20 with Yom Kippur.
NEWS
April 29, 2000
Address: 2401 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach. (The temple shares facilities with Harbor Christian Church.) Mailing address: P.O. Box 10414, Costa Mesa 92627 Phone: (949) 548-6900 Denomination: Conservative-Traditional Judaism Year established: 1974 Service times: Friday night Shabbat services start at 8 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat, a fellowship hour that includes refreshments. Senior rabbi: Marc S. Rubenstein. Rubenstein came to Temple Isaiah at the end of February.
NEWS
September 23, 2000
OPEN HOUSE SELICHOT Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach-Conservative will host an Open House Selichot -- prayers and preparation for the High Holy Days -- for members, friends and newcomers to the area at 8 p.m. today. It will be held at the temple, 2401 Irvine Ave. (949) 548-6900. HIGH HOLY DAYS BEGIN Rosh Hashana, Jewish New Year, will be celebrated at the Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach at 8 p.m. Friday with a festive reception hosted by Rabbi Marc Rubenstein.
NEWS
August 24, 2002
Michelle Marr Sunset on Friday will mark the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, and signal the beginning of the High Holy Days, a 10-day period of reflection and renewal that concludes with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. "The High Holy Days are about coming to the synagogue to find improvement for our lives, but this year is a little different," said Rabbi Marc Steven Rubenstein of Temple Isaiah in Newport Beach. "This year, there is a lot of anger toward God, and rabbis feel like they have to give answers to what is going on."
NEWS
September 16, 2004
Deepa Bharath The aroma of apples and honey filled the air in homes and temples on Wednesday at sundown as hundreds of Jewish families rang in the new year -- Rosh Hashanah. It marks the beginning of the High Holy Days, a week of prayer and introspection, which culminates in Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah literally means "head of the year," said Rabbi Reuven Mintz of the Chabad Jewish Center in Newport Beach. "The head of the human body has control over much of the rest of the body," he said.
NEWS
August 17, 2002
SPECIAL EVENTS BIBLE 101 The Rev. Jim Turrell will teach about the structure and composition of the Bible for four weeks at 7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Center for Spiritual Discovery, 2850 Mesa Verde Drive East, Costa Mesa. "About the Bible; Jesus, Joseph & Paul" will be the focus of this Wednesday's class. A "love offering" is suggested. (714) 754-7399. MEDITATION CLASSES The Rev. Kathleen Scott will teach about meditation for two more weeks at 7 p.m. Thursday and Aug. 29 at the Center for Spiritual Discovery, 2850 Mesa Verde Drive East, Costa Mesa.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013
Jewish communities in Newport Beach are preparing to celebrate the High Holy Days next week. Temple Isaiah, which shares facilities with Harbor Christian Church at 2401 Irvine Ave., invites anyone interested to attend Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services, beginning the eve of Rosh Hashana, at 8 p.m. Wednesday. Rosh Hashana services will also be held at the temple Sept. 5 and 6, followed by Yom Kippur services Sept. 13 and 14. All will apply a modern approach to traditional prayer, according to a news release.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Candice Baker | September 28, 2009
Local children observed the most solemn High Holy Day of the Jewish year Monday with stories and songs. Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is a day of fasting, repentance and intense prayer for adult Jews. Upon their bar or bat mitzvah, Jewish youths join the adults in observing Yom Kippur. Tradition teaches that God uses a book on Rosh Hashana to list each person’s fate. That fate isn’t sealed until Yom Kippur. Before then, Jewish people seek forgiveness, both for things done against God and things done against other people.
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | September 21, 2007
“Story Lady” Lisa Cohen likes to put a Jewish spin on some of her stories. Bunny Foo Foo, for instance, realizes he was wrong to bop the field mice on the head, so he kisses them on the cheek instead. Goldie Locks helps Baby Bear fix his broken chair, and now they have a play date every Tuesday. “That’s a Rosh Hashana story; they realize the error in their ways,” Cohen said. Cohen, whose day job involves entertaining children, is overseeing children’s services for the High Holy Days at the Hyatt Regency in Newport Beach for Chabad Jewish Center this year.
NEWS
By: | October 9, 2005
POLITICS Campbell wins primary with 45.6% of votes Republican state Sen. John Campbell on Tuesday took the most votes in a special primary to fill the 48th District Congressional seat, but his 45.6% of the ballots cast wasn't enough to head off a general election, which is set for Dec. 6. Had Campbell won 50% plus one vote, he would have become the successor to Rep. Chris Cox, who left to chair the Securities and...
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 4, 2005
When the sound of the shofar reverberates through the synagogue today, it's time to ring in the year 5766. Rosh Hashana, the holiday that signifies the start of the Jewish New Year, began Monday night and continues today with services and the traditional blowing of the ram's horn, called the shofar. The High Holy Days are the most important time on the Jewish calendar. They include Rosh Hashana and the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, which is Oct. 12. It's a time of quiet introspection, when Jews across the world contemplate the past year and atone for their sins.
NEWS
October 19, 2004
MAXINE COHEN This time last month, I was sitting in temple, worshipping at the High Holy Days. If you're Jewish, as I am, the 10 days from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur is the holiest time of the year. These are the Days of Awe, when you look back over the past year, ask forgiveness for your sins and welcome in the new year. Now, mea culpa, I am not very religious. In fact, truth be told, this is the only time of the year that I attend services, even though I enjoy the services at Temple Bat Yahm a lot. It's a time for me to be quiet, to reconnect with myself, my daughter and my heritage.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
Deepa Bharath The aroma of apples and honey filled the air in homes and temples on Wednesday at sundown as hundreds of Jewish families rang in the new year -- Rosh Hashanah. It marks the beginning of the High Holy Days, a week of prayer and introspection, which culminates in Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah literally means "head of the year," said Rabbi Reuven Mintz of the Chabad Jewish Center in Newport Beach. "The head of the human body has control over much of the rest of the body," he said.
NEWS
September 26, 2003
Luis Pena For the past two years, the celebrations of the Jewish New Year have been unusually solemn. In 2001, Rosh Hashana, the two-day observance of the new year, came right after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. It was an unusually difficult occasion in Newport-Mesa synagogues. Last year, thoughts stay turned to the tumultuous year after the attacks. Tonight, as the sun sets and the celebration begins, thoughts will be turned toward global problems, including the war in Iraq and the continuing violence in Israel, said Rabbi Marc Rubenstein of Temple Isaiah in Newport Beach.
NEWS
September 20, 2003
SPECIAL EVENTS OPEN HOUSE SE'LICHOT There will be an Open House Se'Lichot at Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach -- setting the tone of solemnity that characterizes the upcoming High Holy Days. Temple Isaiah will hold its Se'Lichot at 8 p.m. today at 2401 Irvine Ave. The prayers of Se'Lichot are to ask God to pardon sins and end the suffering of all mankind. It looks for forgiveness. Information: (949) 548-6900. YOM KIPPUR The Pacific Community of Secular Humanistic Jews will present a Yom Kippur observance at 1 p.m. Oct. 6 at the Unitarian Church of Costa Mesa.
NEWS
August 24, 2002
Michelle Marr Sunset on Friday will mark the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, and signal the beginning of the High Holy Days, a 10-day period of reflection and renewal that concludes with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. "The High Holy Days are about coming to the synagogue to find improvement for our lives, but this year is a little different," said Rabbi Marc Steven Rubenstein of Temple Isaiah in Newport Beach. "This year, there is a lot of anger toward God, and rabbis feel like they have to give answers to what is going on."
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|