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Hawaiian Chieftain

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NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | December 30, 2009
With its sails unfurled and a few cannon blasts, the tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain docked in Newport Beach on Wednesday after a roughly 300-mile, three-day voyage from Santa Cruz. A few spectators gathered at the Newport Sea Base to watch the 103-foot topsail ketch slowly emerge from the gray drizzle that hung over Newport Harbor Wednesday afternoon, chugging up the bay on motor power before making a U-turn to dock at the Sea Base. A reproduction of a typical European cargo ship of the 19th century, the Hawaiian Chieftain will be in Newport Beach through Jan. 10, offering tours and sailing trips.
NEWS
January 10, 2003
June Casagrande Too often, the Hawaiian Chieftain plays wallflower to belle of the ball the Lynx. But cast a spotlight on this tall ship, and it's clear that she, too, deserves some attention. "She's a beautiful vessel," said Lynn McFarlane, a spokeswoman for the San Francisco-based Hawaiian Chieftain. Like the Lynx, the Chieftain is in town for educational tours, cruises and a battle reenactment. The Lynx usually gets more ink, especially in these times of heightened military awareness, because of her role in the war of 1812 as a privateer -- basically a legal pirate ship.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT HARBOR -- Opening a window in time, two old-time clipper ships sailed into the harbor Tuesday as a reminder of the area's nautical past. Mayor Gary Adams laid out the welcome mat, presenting one of the ships' captains with an honorary key to Newport Beach and a plaque. "I'd like to thank you for including us on your ports of call," Adams said during a brief ceremony. "It's great to have you." The Hawaiian Chieftain and Lady Washington, in the midst of a six-month educational tour of the state's coastline, will be docked behind the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum until Feb. 5. During their stay, the ships and their 53-member crew will enlighten local fourth- and fifth-graders about life on an 18th century sailing vessel.
NEWS
January 13, 2002
HAWAIIAN CHIEFTAIN AND LADY WASHINGTON It's a tradition. The tall ships Hawaiian Chieftain and Lady Washington will once again dock this week near the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum this week as they tour their way along the state's coastline. The Lady Washington is a replica of an American ship that sailed around Cape Horn in the late 1780s. The Hawaiian Chieftain replicates an 18th century square-rigged ship. While they're in town, through Jan. 22, the ships will be open for tours and sails.
NEWS
February 4, 2001
Stefanie Frith NEWPORT BEACH -- Adjusting his pirate hat, five-year-old Alex Mitchell of Corona del Mar pulled on his mother Karen's arm and started to get excited. "Look, look!" he said. "I can see the pirate flag." Karen Mitchell, 39, laughed, and shielding her eyes from the sun, looked out from the deck of the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum at the two tall ships docked in the harbor. "We saw the ships while driving [on East Coast Highway]
NEWS
January 16, 2004
Deepa Bharath Don't be surprised if you see cannons blasting off in Newport Harbor two weeks from now. Don't be surprised either if you see pirates let out battle cries as two tall ships bearing wild buccaneers of yore fight it out in the harbor, normally home to modern pleasure boats and yachts. It will all be part of the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum's Pirates of Newport exhibit, spurred by the phenomenal success of the Hollywood blockbuster "Pirates of the Caribbean."
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | December 27, 2011
Sure, it may seem like a time warp to see a couple of old wooden merchant and naval ships tied up in Newport Harbor this week, but wait until you're aboard. For the next week the public is invited to tour two late 18th-century vessels that will be docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. One, the Lady Washington, is better known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," the first in the Disney movie line. In the film, Capt.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
The two historic tall ships docked in Newport Harbor have extended their stay for another week. Their next scheduled port, Oceanside, has impassable shoals, so the 18th- and 17th-century replicas will remain in Newport until Jan. 11, a representative of the ships announced Thursday. Visitors will be able to sail aboard the Lady Washington, also known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," and the Hawaiian Chieftain during mock battles or "adventure" cruises at 2 p.m. Jan. 7 and 8. Crews in period costume also mill aboard the boats as they are docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. Walk-on tours at the docks do not require a reservation, and have a $3 suggested donation.
NEWS
January 14, 2002
Ahoy. This week, you might hear the roar of cannons off our coast as the 103-foot Hawaiian Chieftain and the 112-foot Lady Washington attempt to outmaneuver each other in a battle reenactment. The two 18th Century replica tall ships will arrive in Newport Harbor on Tuesday and will berth until Jan. 22 at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum's stern-wheeler replica, the Pride of Newport. The ships, on another six-month tour, will host dockside tours as well as educational school outings, reenactment cannon battles and training to be a 18th Century sailor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2012
TILL SATURDAY Canoe Under Holiday Lights Enjoy outrigger canoeing for all ages and skill levels around Balboa islands under the glow of holiday lights decking out the watercraft and homes competing in the 103rd annual Boat Parade. Participants go out crowd-free on a non-boat parade day. Cost is $35 per person. Corporate and private holiday party paddles are available upon request. Meet at Newport Aquatic Center, 1 Whitecliffs Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, call (949-646-7725)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2012
TUESDAY Women With Younger Men Newport Beach author Judith Fancher will give a talk about "Females and Younger Men" during a luncheon at Muldoon's Irish Pub, 202 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. The $25 event is sponsored by the Women of Temple Bat Yahm, includes lunch and is open to men and women, but reservations are required. For more information, call (949) 644-1999. 'One World Rhythm' The Newport Beach Public Library presents "One World Rhythm," an interactive educational program in which children can learn about drums, percussion and other instruments and their cultural origins.
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NEWS
December 29, 2011
The two historic tall ships docked in Newport Harbor have extended their stay for another week. Their next scheduled port, Oceanside, has impassable shoals, so the 18th- and 17th-century replicas will remain in Newport until Jan. 11, a representative of the ships announced Thursday. Visitors will be able to sail aboard the Lady Washington, also known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," and the Hawaiian Chieftain during mock battles or "adventure" cruises at 2 p.m. Jan. 7 and 8. Crews in period costume also mill aboard the boats as they are docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. Walk-on tours at the docks do not require a reservation, and have a $3 suggested donation.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | December 27, 2011
Sure, it may seem like a time warp to see a couple of old wooden merchant and naval ships tied up in Newport Harbor this week, but wait until you're aboard. For the next week the public is invited to tour two late 18th-century vessels that will be docked at the Newport Sea Base, 1931 W. Coast Hwy. One, the Lady Washington, is better known as the HMS Interceptor from 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," the first in the Disney movie line. In the film, Capt.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | February 7, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — From the street it looks like a gallery of European fine art, but for the last few months it has been the unlikely home to a piece of surfing history. In this Cannery Village art conservation and restoration studio, Ardenia Capannelli has restored a painting on a board owned by Duke Kahanamoku, considered the father of modern surfing. Wedged between a painting of French lovers from the 1800s and a Raphael-style 1600s portrait of a noble woman, the 11-foot, 6-inch redwood and balsa wood board has been revived by a woman far removed from the board's Hawaiian roots.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | December 30, 2009
With its sails unfurled and a few cannon blasts, the tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain docked in Newport Beach on Wednesday after a roughly 300-mile, three-day voyage from Santa Cruz. A few spectators gathered at the Newport Sea Base to watch the 103-foot topsail ketch slowly emerge from the gray drizzle that hung over Newport Harbor Wednesday afternoon, chugging up the bay on motor power before making a U-turn to dock at the Sea Base. A reproduction of a typical European cargo ship of the 19th century, the Hawaiian Chieftain will be in Newport Beach through Jan. 10, offering tours and sailing trips.
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