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Hanukkah

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By Rabbi Marc Rubenstein | December 7, 2012
Hanukkah, meaning "dedication" in Hebrew, refers to the joyous eight-day celebration during which Jews commemorate the victory of the Maccabees over the armies of Syria in 165 B.C.E. and the subsequent liberation and "rededication" of the Temple in Jerusalem. The modern home celebration of Hanukkah centers around the lighting of the chanukiah , a special menorah for Hanukkah; unique foods, latkes and jelly doughnuts; and special songs and games. This year, we kindle the first candle of Hanukkah on Saturday night and the last candle Dec. 15. * How to bless the candles Q: How should the candles be placed in the chanukiah ?
NEWS
November 27, 1999
Alex Coolman Call it the Other Miracle of Hanukkah: Not the miracle that happened more than 2,000 years ago in the Temple of Jerusalem when a day's worth of lamp oil lasted for eight days, but the miracle that happens every year in the United States when Hanukkah, a holiday that takes place perilously close to Christmas, somehow manages to avoid most of the crass commercialization that goes along with the events of...
FEATURES
December 1, 2007
Chanukah Wonderland visitors can pose for a picture with Judah Maccabee and make their own Menorahs Sunday. The event will begin the 2007 Hanukkah season, Dec. 4 through 12. The celebration, sponsored by Chabad Jewish Center, is from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency, 1107 Jamboree Road in Newport Beach. Festivities will include Hanukkah magic shows at 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. and puppet shows at 2 and 3 p.m. Admission is $10, and parking is complimentary. Chabad Jewish Center will also host its annual Menorah lighting at 3 p.m. Dec. 9 in the Bloomingdale?
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | December 11, 2006
Isaac Mintz had a hankering to fry something. He lined a basket held by Pamela Lovell with doughnuts he had just helped roll. Unfortunately for Isaac, that was as close as he would get to crisping the warm treats children like himself would later douse with icing, cinnamon and powdered sugar, during the first ever Chanukah Wonderland celebration in Newport Beach Sunday afternoon. The event, held in a tent next to the pool of the Hyatt Regency Newport Beach, proved as educational as it was entertaining for children, offering a number of activities teaching youngsters the "whys" behind each of the Hanukkah traditions.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | December 10, 2007
For years Leon Leyson chose not to speak openly about his experiences during the Holocaust. The youngest survivor of the famous Schindler’s List, now 78, simply thought people would not be interested. That was until Steven Spielberg’s pivotal 1993 film “Schindler’s List” came out, telling the true-life encounters of Leyson and thousands of others under the Nazi regime in Poland. Grossing more than $300 million worldwide, the film brought to light a horrific and inspiring story of how one businessman and noted Nazi supporter, Oskar Schindler, saved more than 1,100 Polish Jews from almost certain death at German hands.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 29, 2013
On Friday, the third night of Hanukkah, the grass was wet, but at least it wasn't raining anymore. And that was a good thing for Temple Bat Yahm, which held its menorah-lighting ceremony outside on its grassy lawn in Newport Beach for all to see. "It just cleared up in time," said senior Rabbi Gersh Zylberman with a smile. "It was touch and go this morning, but we had faith that everything would be OK. " Zylberman and Cantor Jonathan Grant led the ceremony from a ladder so they could light the candles atop the giant menorah.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | December 20, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH - In a season where neighbors compete for the biggest and brightest holiday displays, the message for youngsters Tuesday night was that a little bit of light can go a long way. Hundreds of participants gathered in Fashion Island's Atrium Garden Court for the 4:30 p.m. Chanukah Community Party, hosted by the Chabad Jewish Center of Newport Beach, and the lighting of the 6-foot "Surf 'n' Sand" menorah with former Dodger Shawn Green....
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | December 11, 2007
Rabbi Reuven Mintz of Chabad Jewish Center lights the Hanukkah candles in a back dining room decorated with cardboard Santas and Christmas trees at Flagship Healthcare Center in Newport Beach. “Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us by His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the lights of Hanukkah,” Mintz recites in Hebrew. The menorah is one made by Mintz’s young son, decorated in magic marker with a football and a soccer ball.
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | December 5, 2007
Each Hanukkah, members of Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach bring menorahs of all shapes, sizes and colors into the temple sanctuary one night of the holiday. There are menorahs with political or sports themes, modern and traditional styles. “All the different styles and shapes, colors and materials really shows you the different colors and shapes we are,” said Rabbi Mark Miller of Temple Bat Yahm. Hanukkah began at sundown Tuesday. The holiday, which commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, has a different meaning for everyone.
NEWS
December 3, 1999
Amy R. Spurgeon Jewish families throughout the community will be lighting the first candle of the menorah today to signal the beginning of Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights. Hanukkah is the eight-day Jewish festival that recalls the Jewish Maccabees' rededication of their temple in 165 BC after their victory over the Syrians. When the Jews reclaimed their temple, they discovered they had enough oil to light the temple's candelabrum for just one night.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 29, 2013
On Friday, the third night of Hanukkah, the grass was wet, but at least it wasn't raining anymore. And that was a good thing for Temple Bat Yahm, which held its menorah-lighting ceremony outside on its grassy lawn in Newport Beach for all to see. "It just cleared up in time," said senior Rabbi Gersh Zylberman with a smile. "It was touch and go this morning, but we had faith that everything would be OK. " Zylberman and Cantor Jonathan Grant led the ceremony from a ladder so they could light the candles atop the giant menorah.
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NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | December 14, 2012
In the spirit of my life work with Fr. Tom Hartman (who sends his love to all even as he enters the deepest fog of Parkinson's disease), I offer my annual Hanukkah greeting for people who don't celebrate Hanukkah. Next week, I'll send along my Christmas prayer for people who don't celebrate Christmas. The point of this spiritual flip-flop is to remind us that even during the holidays that most separate us, we can still find abundant and important meanings that unite us. So here's a sense of what the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah can teach people who have no intention of kindling a menorah this week: One family can make a big difference in the world.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Rubenstein | December 7, 2012
Hanukkah, meaning "dedication" in Hebrew, refers to the joyous eight-day celebration during which Jews commemorate the victory of the Maccabees over the armies of Syria in 165 B.C.E. and the subsequent liberation and "rededication" of the Temple in Jerusalem. The modern home celebration of Hanukkah centers around the lighting of the chanukiah , a special menorah for Hanukkah; unique foods, latkes and jelly doughnuts; and special songs and games. This year, we kindle the first candle of Hanukkah on Saturday night and the last candle Dec. 15. * How to bless the candles Q: How should the candles be placed in the chanukiah ?
NEWS
By Maureen Aschoff | December 24, 2011
Candles have been used for more than 5,000 years. Although the ancient Egyptians may have been among the first to use them as torches, the Romans are credited with developing the wicked candle. In the ancient world, candles were the major source of light. During modern December celebrations, candlelight continues to shed light, traditions and comfort. Every year, for example, Jews gather to brighten their homes with candles and feast for eight straight days in celebration of Hanukkah, which started more than 2,000 years ago. At that time, there was a great temple in Jerusalem, Judea (now Israel)
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | December 20, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH - In a season where neighbors compete for the biggest and brightest holiday displays, the message for youngsters Tuesday night was that a little bit of light can go a long way. Hundreds of participants gathered in Fashion Island's Atrium Garden Court for the 4:30 p.m. Chanukah Community Party, hosted by the Chabad Jewish Center of Newport Beach, and the lighting of the 6-foot "Surf 'n' Sand" menorah with former Dodger Shawn Green....
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2011
TILL THURSDAY Toy Drive Patrick's Pub, at 2645 Harbor Blvd. in Costa Mesa, is sponsoring its fifth annual toy drive for the Someone Cares Soup Kitchen. The pub will accept donations of new and unwrapped toys. For more information, call (714) 966-2721. FRIDAY Temple Isaiah Celebrates Hanukkah Temple Isaiah, at 2401 Irvine Ave. in Newport Beach, will celebrate Hanukkah with a 6:30 p.m. pot luck dinner followed by a Sabbath Eve service at 8 p.m. If you plan to attend the dinner, please bring a vegetarian or dairy dish and a menorah for the fourth night of Hanukkah.
NEWS
By Rabbi Mark S. Miller | December 16, 2011
Hanukkah commemorates the collision of two great cultures, the conflict between Hellenism and Judaism. As Jewish people celebrate the 2,176th anniversary of that battle in ancient Judea, we focus on the light of Jerusalem overcoming the dark spirit of Athens. The Jewish people held fast to the idea of man created in the image of God, against the Greek belief in gods who were created in the image of man. The gods were actors in a celestial soap-opera that mirrored man's lusts, projected his power struggles, and exemplified his foibles.
FEATURES
December 25, 2009
If President Obama is a Christian as he claims to be, he should decorate his home with a Christian theme, if for no other reason than to educate his daughters about the true meaning of Christmas: God, in his love for humanity, coming to us as a child, making himself dependent and weak, in need of our love, so that rather than fearing him, we would love him. Interestingly, the New York Times recently reported that the Obamas were strongly considering not...
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | December 11, 2009
On each night of Hanukkah for the past 30 years, Rabbi Mark Miller of Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach has lit a candle on a special menorah made out of barbed wire. The menorah was a gift from a man who survived the concentration camps of the Holocaust. He later vowed to devote his life to making holy things that produce light. “The message is that the light of Hanukkah and the light of God, faith and truth can illuminate our planet,” Miller said. “It is always ordained that we light these lights in the darkness to demonstrate the power of light to banish darkness.
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | December 11, 2007
Rabbi Reuven Mintz of Chabad Jewish Center lights the Hanukkah candles in a back dining room decorated with cardboard Santas and Christmas trees at Flagship Healthcare Center in Newport Beach. “Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us by His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the lights of Hanukkah,” Mintz recites in Hebrew. The menorah is one made by Mintz’s young son, decorated in magic marker with a football and a soccer ball.
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