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Guidelines

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NEWS
January 24, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- The mechanics of Greenlight remain uncertain after City Council members spent Tuesday afternoon discussing possible guidelines for the slow-growth initiative. Approved by voters in November, the new law requires citywide elections on any general plan amendment for a project that adds more than 100 peak-hour car trips or dwelling units, or 40,000 square feet more than the plan allows. While council members are not required to adopt guidelines, the text of the initiative encourages it. But the initiative requires at least six of the city's seven elected officials to vote in favor of any rules.
NEWS
May 27, 2003
Deirdre Newman After an exhaustive review, changes to the city's zoning code and design guidelines will be considered again tonight at the Planning Commission meeting. Councilman Gary Monahan was the first to initiate review of the code and guidelines to make the process clearer and faster. The changes cover issues like floor area ratios, second-story construction and design review procedures. The changes are holding up the City Council's decision on view protection guidelines and an overlay zone that the council delayed until July in hopes the changes would be ready for consideration by then.
NEWS
By: | September 3, 2005
o7The Air Force this week has announced new guidelines for religious tolerance that seek to have members of the service refrain from public prayer at official functions. The move comes in response to allegations of pervasive religious intolerance that favored Christian evangelicals at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs. Some have wondered if the guidelines will be implemented fairly. What do you think of the guidelines and the chances of their being properly implemented?
NEWS
March 29, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- The law has been in place since December, but it took until Tuesday for the final nuts and bolts of the city's slow-growth measure to be ironed out. After months of discussion, six of the seven City Council members adopted a set of guidelines, now known as council policy A-18, that will help to put the Greenlight law to work. Councilman Gary Proctor was absent from the meeting. Council members, a majority of whom had opposed the initiative that voters approved in November, said they felt confident the guidelines followed the intent of the city's residents at the polls.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | December 22, 2010
As manager of the cardiovascular program at the UC Irvine Medical Center, Nathalie De Michelis sees many patients who either have a propensity for heart failure or are well on their way and need help. That's where the hospital in Orange and its cardiology staff come in. They offer advice, medication and tests to determine whether that shortness of breath, high blood pressure, slight fluid in the lungs and swollen feet are things to worry about. Established three years ago, the medical center's Heart Failure Program has been treating about 70 regular patients every three months, half of whom are between the ages of 46 and 85, De Michelis said.
LOCAL
By Joseph Serna | December 7, 2009
A Newport Beach man could be sentenced up to 63 months in federal prison, depending on his criminal past and if he accepts his responsibility for defrauding two companies out of nearly $3 million, federal court records show. Mitchell Keith Kleinman, 45, pleaded guilty in the U.S. District Court’s Charlotte division in North Carolina last month to conspiracy and money laundering for his part in a scheme to overbill Georgia Pacific, a manufacturing company out of Atlanta, and Hickory Springs Manufacturing Co. out of North Carolina.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
Deirdre Newman The ambiguous duo of "harmony and compatibility," which has bedeviled residents and officials since it was added to the city's residential design guidelines, may be excised tonight. In its place could be "design excellence," with specifics on how to achieve that excellence. Today, the Planning Commission will consider changing the city's zoning code and residential design guidelines, covering issues such as floor area ratios, second-story construction and design review procedures.
NEWS
January 29, 2003
Deirdre Newman Costa Mesa by the Sea is a reality for only a small number of privileged homeowners in the city. Yet residents in areas that offer ocean views are divided over whether the city should enact regulations to protect those views. That conflict was mirrored in the Planning Commission's handling of the issue Monday. Although the planners ultimately voted 4-1, with Commissioner Bill Perkins dissenting, to approve guidelines for ocean-view protection for second-story home additions, they did so with trepidation.
NEWS
July 30, 2003
Deirdre Newman Two years ago, the City Council set guidelines to control explosive growth after officials noticed small lot developments running rampant on the Eastside. Despite the guidelines, developers often try to circumvent the rules. The fate of the two projects, which happen to be on the same block of Elden Avenue, represents how tough those guidelines can be. On Monday one developer who reduced the size of his project to abide by the guidelines was rewarded with approval by the Planning Commission, while another who requested a slew of exceptions to requirements for his project was not. The project that was approved Monday calls for a three-unit development at 2459 Elden Ave. Architect Bruce Stookey of Andrade Architects, representing property owner Ferguson/Day Properties, had originally suggested five units, but that was not blessed by the planning staff, said Planning Commission Chair Bruce Garlich.
NEWS
January 10, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- For now, only one thing remains certain about Greenlight's guidelines: City officials and supporters of the slow-growth initiative want to work together to put the measure in place. Just when they will is up for debate. Both sides presented their guideline proposals at a City Council study session Tuesday, but council members could go no further than to decide to continue discussions at a future meeting. Greenlight -- overwhelmingly approved by voters in November -- requires citywide elections on any general plan amendment for a project that adds more than 100 peak-hour car trips or dwelling units, or 40,000 square feet more than the plan allows.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By The Times editorial board | April 17, 2014
When Hoag Hospital, which has facilities in Irvine and Newport Beach, announced it was establishing a partnership with St. Joseph Health System, community groups say they were promised that the hospital would continue to provide the same services it always had. But soon after - and not all that surprisingly, given that St. Joseph is Catholic-run - Hoag declared that it would stop providing elective abortions. The decision drew an angry protest from some doctors and women's groups, who felt they had been lied to. On top of that, Hoag explained it was giving up the procedure because of low demand, although it subsequently turned out that ending elective abortions was a condition of the partnership from the start.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | March 13, 2014
Most members of the Costa Mesa Charter Committee gave a thumbs-up Wednesday night to sending the draft of the charter they created to the City Council for further review. The 13-member committee met about 15 times over 10 months, debating all the way to make the six-page, constitution-like document a reality. After the council reviews and possibly alters the document, voters will probably get a chance to accept or deny it at the ballot box in November. On Wednesday, 10 of the charter committee members found the paper satisfactory enough to send it on. Committee member Harold Weitzberg dissented; members Mary Ann O'Connell and Bill Fancher were absent.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | September 13, 2012
The head of a Costa Mesa employee group is questioning a management memo to workers outlining which political activities are prohibited at City Hall. Costa Mesa City Employees Assn. President Helen Nenadal said in a letter to city CEO Tom Gatch that she agrees with many of the broad principles in his directive, as some political activity is illegal on the public's time, but questioned the timining and motivation of the orders. "Although some of the memo is legally accurate, it overstates the law in other areas and provides conflicting guidance regarding employee break time," Nenadal wrote.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | January 6, 2012
When many people think of Newport Beach, palm trees and glistening yachts come to mind. But for some residents, business owners and city officials, the picture isn't so idyllic. In one part of the city, bare dirt and a chain-link fence pass for the shoulder of a major city entryway. In another, businesses turn over like the tide and visitors clog parking spaces meant for residents. To bring these areas up to what some consider "Newport Beach standards," city officials last year launched a campaign to revitalize five specific places.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams, lauren.williams@latimes.com | August 24, 2011
COSTA MESA — The city's Homeless Task Force has tentatively decided that only those with strong ties to the community be allowed to qualify for homeless services. The qualifications are largely based on those used by the city's Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program. The HPRP outlines that a person must have lived in Costa Mesa within the past 24 months, for at least 90 days, with proof of residency, including a previous lease, proof of utility service, written proof of residency from a landlord or school records.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | August 17, 2011
COSTA MESA — City employees have reluctantly agreed to participate in the newly formed Contracting Committees that will review Costa Mesa services before city Chief Executive Tom Hatch opens them up for bidding from outside groups. In a letter to Hatch on Tuesday, Costa Mesa City Employees Assn. (CMCEA) President Helen Nenadal said the organization will participate, but she repeated her request that the union see the committee's guidelines ahead of time. Her request was in response to a letter Hatch sent to the CMCEA on Friday.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | May 13, 2011
SANTA ANA — The battle over selling the Orange County Fairgrounds moved from Sacramento to a Santa Ana appellate courtroom Friday. Attorneys for the state, which is trying to sell the 150-acre Costa mesa property, and for a Newport Beach company that intends to buy it tried to persuade a three-judge panel to bring the almost two-year saga to a close. Friday's hearing was supposed to focus on whether the Court of Appeal should lift a court order blocking the sale of fairgrounds to the company, Facilities Management West.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | April 20, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — For the first time in decades, doctors believe that early diagnosis may help delay the onset of Alzheimer's Disease in some patients, local health experts said. The change was brought on by this week's announcement that the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Assn. have published new guidelines for diagnosing the disease — the first revised set in 27 years. The new guidelines recognize an earlier stage, a change in the memory called mild cognitive impairment, which in many patients is linked to the later development of dementia that occurs 7 to 22 years earlier than previously recognized, said Dr. William Shankle, program director for Memory & Cognitive Disorders at Hoag Hospital's Neurosciences Institute.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | March 23, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — A 25-year-old regulation may preclude the proposed Ronald Reagan centennial statue and other statues from being displayed prominently in Castaways Park, according to the city attorney. The park is intended to be "a natural setting with unobtrusive additions," according to the planning guidelines for Upper Castaways, the area including the park. City Atty. David Hunt said at Tuesday's council meeting that the city manager will have to determine if the proposed statue violates that regulation.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | December 22, 2010
As manager of the cardiovascular program at the UC Irvine Medical Center, Nathalie De Michelis sees many patients who either have a propensity for heart failure or are well on their way and need help. That's where the hospital in Orange and its cardiology staff come in. They offer advice, medication and tests to determine whether that shortness of breath, high blood pressure, slight fluid in the lungs and swollen feet are things to worry about. Established three years ago, the medical center's Heart Failure Program has been treating about 70 regular patients every three months, half of whom are between the ages of 46 and 85, De Michelis said.
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