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NEWS
April 30, 2008
The Costa Mesa Sanitary District has adopted an ordinance requiring — whenever possible — the purchase of recycled materials as part of a broader green initiative program promoted by the district. The program is one of many the office promotes.   “We’ll now encourage the use of recycled materials whenever there is a construction activity ongoing, or anywhere else,” said District Assistant Manager Thomas Fauth. The district’s corporate yard is also Costa Mesa’s first “green” building, adhering to the “Gold” standards established by the U.S. Green Building Council, which rates projects based on their consideration for the environment.
NEWS
September 16, 2009
UCI has earned another LEED New Construction Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council — the second-highest rating for green buildings — for the expansion of the campus recreation center, completed last year. The Anteater Recreation Center’s 26,000-square-foot expansion outperforms California energy usage standards by 25% and gets more than 70% of its energy from renewable sources, university officials said in a news release. They said that the building uses 43% less water — or 96,000 fewer gallons — than a conventional facility of that size and it diverts 75% of construction waste away from landfills.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
A research building on UC Irvine’s campus has earned the university its fourth environmental design award in two years, school officials announced Tuesday. The U.S. Green Building Council has awarded UCI a gold certificate in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for its 147,975-square-foot Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences building. The building was completed in 2007 and annually saves more than 200 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions and 500,000 gallons of water with more efficient fixtures, and 25% of the building is made of recycled materials.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | July 2, 2008
As part of an ongoing effort to get more people to buy homes on the Westside instead of renting, the Costa Mesa City Council voted to approve a new three-story condominium development Tuesday. The motion passed 4-1, with Mayor Pro Tem Allan Mansoor voting no. He did not explain his objection during the meeting and was unavailable for comment in time for publication. Earlier in the year, some neighbors were angry about the development being too dense and not addressing noise and parking issues, but many of those concerns were addressed in a project redesign, developers said.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | July 31, 2007
COSTA MESA — When it comes to building design, the wave of the future may well be waterless. That's waterless — as in landscaping with cactus gardens that don't need much irrigation, or waterless urinals that save thousands of gallons per year. But cutting down water use is only one of the strategies Costa Mesa city officials are pursuing to make the city more "green," encouraging public and private buildings that are more friendly to the environment. At City Hall, a team of builders, planners and other staff members created a plan to make existing facilities more efficient, and to make sure any new city buildings will meet the standards of the U.S. Green Building Council, which rates developments on how well they conserve water and energy, use recycled materials, and accommodate transportation alternatives like bicycles or hybrid cars.
NEWS
November 1, 2004
Alicia Robinson Environmental friendliness is now a quantifiable attribute, and two local buildings are trying to prove they have it. St. Mark Presbyterian Church's new sanctuary and Hoag Hospital's women's pavilion are registered with the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, and officials hope to get the facilities officially labeled "green" by the council. Registering a project is the first step to getting certified by the Green Building Council, a coalition of leaders from the building industry who promote environmentally sound and profitable buildings.
BUSINESS
By Mona Shadia | March 8, 2010
Steve Blanchard, a real estate development investor, had an idea to build a house for his family that would efficiently use energy and be environmentally friendly. Today his house at 1811 Gisler Ave. in Costa Mesa is the first in Orange County to receive a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design platinum rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. In the parlance of green building, the designation is known as LEED certification. But in plain English, that means Blanchard’s house is considered one of the most environmentally friendly houses in Orange County.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | April 30, 2007
After 35 years in trailers at its 16th Street nature haven, the Environmental Nature Center plans to move into a permanent building. Appropriately, it will use recycled materials, will be ventilated naturally with no air conditioning, and will incorporate solar panels to produce the building's power. The Newport Beach planning commission will consider the plans next week, and if all goes well, the center will break ground for the new building in July, said Environmental Nature Center Executive Director Bo Glover.
LOCAL
By Joseph Serna | November 5, 2009
Through 25 years of marriage, Greg and Stacey Brown dreamed of living on the beach. In a matter of hours, they watched their dream home pieced together — literally. In the first of its kind in Orange County, the Browns watched as their LEED-platinum certified house — which all but ensures it as the most eco-friendly home on the block — was assembled just a short walk away from the sand and waves in Newport Beach. “We just wanted to do something a little different,” Greg said with a smile, looking on as a 250-ton crane put the second story of his house into place.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | September 26, 2012
Davis Magnet School emphasizes environmentalism with Eco-Education Nights, "Waste-Free Wednesdays" and an ecology center. Now it's been chosen for a green-classroom experiment. The Orange County U.S. Green Building Council selected the Costa Mesa K-6 campus to receive a free "greenovation" of one of its classrooms in order to collect data on the financial impact of going green. The council hopes to reaffirm anecdotal evidence that an environmentally friendly classroom is healthier and cost-effective.
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BUSINESS
By Mona Shadia | March 8, 2010
Steve Blanchard, a real estate development investor, had an idea to build a house for his family that would efficiently use energy and be environmentally friendly. Today his house at 1811 Gisler Ave. in Costa Mesa is the first in Orange County to receive a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design platinum rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. In the parlance of green building, the designation is known as LEED certification. But in plain English, that means Blanchard’s house is considered one of the most environmentally friendly houses in Orange County.
LOCAL
By Joseph Serna | November 5, 2009
Through 25 years of marriage, Greg and Stacey Brown dreamed of living on the beach. In a matter of hours, they watched their dream home pieced together — literally. In the first of its kind in Orange County, the Browns watched as their LEED-platinum certified house — which all but ensures it as the most eco-friendly home on the block — was assembled just a short walk away from the sand and waves in Newport Beach. “We just wanted to do something a little different,” Greg said with a smile, looking on as a 250-ton crane put the second story of his house into place.
NEWS
September 16, 2009
UCI has earned another LEED New Construction Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council — the second-highest rating for green buildings — for the expansion of the campus recreation center, completed last year. The Anteater Recreation Center’s 26,000-square-foot expansion outperforms California energy usage standards by 25% and gets more than 70% of its energy from renewable sources, university officials said in a news release. They said that the building uses 43% less water — or 96,000 fewer gallons — than a conventional facility of that size and it diverts 75% of construction waste away from landfills.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
A research building on UC Irvine’s campus has earned the university its fourth environmental design award in two years, school officials announced Tuesday. The U.S. Green Building Council has awarded UCI a gold certificate in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for its 147,975-square-foot Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences building. The building was completed in 2007 and annually saves more than 200 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions and 500,000 gallons of water with more efficient fixtures, and 25% of the building is made of recycled materials.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | July 2, 2008
As part of an ongoing effort to get more people to buy homes on the Westside instead of renting, the Costa Mesa City Council voted to approve a new three-story condominium development Tuesday. The motion passed 4-1, with Mayor Pro Tem Allan Mansoor voting no. He did not explain his objection during the meeting and was unavailable for comment in time for publication. Earlier in the year, some neighbors were angry about the development being too dense and not addressing noise and parking issues, but many of those concerns were addressed in a project redesign, developers said.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | June 13, 2008
Cotton insulation made out of recycled denim and counter tops fashioned out of compressed recycled paper are just two of the environmentally friendly features that are part of the new Environmental Nature Center in Newport Beach. Constructed out of mostly recycled materials, the building relies on an energy-efficient design without heating or air conditioning systems. “Everyone is very impressed with the sustainable elements that have been put in,” said Bo Glover, executive director of the Environmental Nature Center.
NEWS
April 30, 2008
The Costa Mesa Sanitary District has adopted an ordinance requiring — whenever possible — the purchase of recycled materials as part of a broader green initiative program promoted by the district. The program is one of many the office promotes.   “We’ll now encourage the use of recycled materials whenever there is a construction activity ongoing, or anywhere else,” said District Assistant Manager Thomas Fauth. The district’s corporate yard is also Costa Mesa’s first “green” building, adhering to the “Gold” standards established by the U.S. Green Building Council, which rates projects based on their consideration for the environment.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | July 31, 2007
COSTA MESA — When it comes to building design, the wave of the future may well be waterless. That's waterless — as in landscaping with cactus gardens that don't need much irrigation, or waterless urinals that save thousands of gallons per year. But cutting down water use is only one of the strategies Costa Mesa city officials are pursuing to make the city more "green," encouraging public and private buildings that are more friendly to the environment. At City Hall, a team of builders, planners and other staff members created a plan to make existing facilities more efficient, and to make sure any new city buildings will meet the standards of the U.S. Green Building Council, which rates developments on how well they conserve water and energy, use recycled materials, and accommodate transportation alternatives like bicycles or hybrid cars.
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