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NEWS
November 15, 2012
The Orange Coast College Recycling Center, along with the Costa Mesa Sanitary District, will collect and recycle residential kitchen grease, oil and fat, which shouldn't be poured down the drain or thrown in the trash. Pouring grease down the sink can cause blocked drainpipes and sewer back-ups that can send sewage to the ocean. Throwing Thanksgiving bi-products in the garbage contaminates trash trucks and landfills. Grease recycling was started last year as a pilot program just for Thanksgiving.
NEWS
July 14, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- Restaurant owners, at least publicly, are saying they support the city's move this week to toughen its stance on grease heading into city sewer lines. Many of the restaurateurs contacted Friday said their eateries are already equipped with grease interceptors to sift grease out of waste that is put into sinks. "We have a grease bin," said Denyse Bartels, a manager at the Tale of the Whale on Balboa Peninsula. "We don't drain it into anything underground."
NEWS
January 29, 2000
Danette Goulet Parents cut, pasted and painted sets amid racing T-Birds and gum-chomping Pink Ladies at Harbor View Elementary School on Thursday. It was the final dress rehearsal before the weekend performances of "Grease," this year's school play. With 140 students in grades three through six vying for roles, Harbor View created two entire casts -- the Purple Palominos and the Red Hot Racers. The result was dozens of pink vinyl jackets and poodle skirts and the sticky sweet smell of bubble gum permeating the air. "It's really fun to be in a play," said fifth-grader Kessa Palchikoff, who plays the character Rizzo.
NEWS
June 14, 2001
Jennifer Kho COSTA MESA -- The Costa Mesa Sanitary District board will announce its intent to adopt a grease control ordinance at its meeting tonight. In doing so, the board must adopt a letter indicating that it will adopt and enforce the new ordinance."The Costa Mesa Sanitary District does not currently have a grease control ordinance because the building officials within the district's service area have used their discretional authority under the Uniform Plumbing Code to require interceptors where they determined it was appropriate," the proposed statement reads.
NEWS
October 16, 2004
Alicia Robinson Clogged sewer pipes are a squeaky wheel in Orange County, but grease is the last thing Newport Beach officials want to use to solve the problem. To comply with new regulations from the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board, the city is working to educate restaurant owners about how to keep fats, oils and grease out of the pipes and could charge restaurants fees to cover new programs. Oil and grease can cling to the inside of sewer pipes, causing clogs and eventually sewage spills that can be the bane of swimmers and surfers.
NEWS
August 3, 2001
Young Chang Some oxymorons to try: True lies. Clearly misunderstood. A G-rated "Grease." Bill Gekas, co-director of the "Summer Stock" show that opens at Lincoln Elementary School today, cites "I Love Lucy" tactics to explain how it's possible. "You had to wonder how Lucy and Ricky got Little Ricky," he said. "What we've tried to do is keep the joy and the fun and the irreverence of [Grease], but not make it overt as to offend anyone."
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | March 14, 2012
The thought of portraying one of film's most iconic characters on the stage scared the spotlight-loving Danielle Ridge. But, when the time came for the 16-year-old to don the sweet A-line dresses and sweaters of Sandy Dumbrowski, she was filled with excitement. She also wanted to give Estancia High School alumni Joanna Schroeder, who played Sandy in 1982, a performance worthy of her own. "I wanted to give her a really good show," junior Danielle said. "I wanted her to be able to watch that great show that she put on. She already knows what it feels like, but I wanted to show her what it looked like.
NEWS
June 18, 2005
Andrew Edwards Costa Mesa restaurateurs and residents could wind up sharing the costs of keeping grease out of local sewer pipes. The Costa Mesa Sanitary District's board is set to consider billing Costa Mesans later this summer. The board is not scheduled to vote on the proposed fees until August, but if approved, fees will go into effect retroactive to July 1, sanitary district assistant manager Thomas Fauth said. The new fees would be due at the same time as property taxes.
NEWS
June 9, 2001
Jennifer Kho COSTA MESA -- Restaurants soon could be required to install grease traps, on orders from the Orange County Grand Jury. An ordinance requiring the traps is in the works after the grand jury in April sent a letter to the Costa Mesa Sanitary District. The letter stated that grease discharged from restaurants and high-density residential areas is a leading cause of sewage spills and recommended that the city adopt an ordinance to prevent such occurrences.
NEWS
January 8, 2002
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- As regional water regulators move to prohibit any future sewage spills caused by grease blockages, the city is readying a program to include more monitoring and regulation. By March, officials at the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board say they hope to have a new zero-tolerance policy in place for spills. The city has been taking it on the chin from those very same regulators for failing to do enough to prevent spills into Upper Newport Bay. The sticking point, it seems, has been the city's unwillingness to step up requirements on grease-interceptor devices at restaurants.
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NEWS
November 15, 2012
The Orange Coast College Recycling Center, along with the Costa Mesa Sanitary District, will collect and recycle residential kitchen grease, oil and fat, which shouldn't be poured down the drain or thrown in the trash. Pouring grease down the sink can cause blocked drainpipes and sewer back-ups that can send sewage to the ocean. Throwing Thanksgiving bi-products in the garbage contaminates trash trucks and landfills. Grease recycling was started last year as a pilot program just for Thanksgiving.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | March 14, 2012
The thought of portraying one of film's most iconic characters on the stage scared the spotlight-loving Danielle Ridge. But, when the time came for the 16-year-old to don the sweet A-line dresses and sweaters of Sandy Dumbrowski, she was filled with excitement. She also wanted to give Estancia High School alumni Joanna Schroeder, who played Sandy in 1982, a performance worthy of her own. "I wanted to give her a really good show," junior Danielle said. "I wanted her to be able to watch that great show that she put on. She already knows what it feels like, but I wanted to show her what it looked like.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
Grease Lightning is coming to Sonic. Estancia High School students dressed as Sandy Olsen, Danny Zuko, Betty Rizzo and the rest of the gang from "Grease" will take over as celebrity car hops from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at 3095 Harbor Blvd., Costa Mesa. Sonic will donate 20% of the night's proceeds back to the drama department when patrons present the event's flier. The students are promoting their upcoming production of the musical, which takes the stage at 7:30 p.m. March 8 through 10 at Estancia's Barbara Van Holt Theatre, 2323 Placentia Ave. Tickets are $10 for students and $15 for general admission.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | December 2, 2011
COSTA MESA — For the environmentally conscious who still like deep-fried turkey and other holiday eats, Orange Coast College has a solution. The OCC Recycling Center, along with the Costa Mesa Sanitary District, has launched a pilot program to collect and recycle residential kitchen grease, oil and fat that would normally get poured down the drain or thrown in the trash. "I hope people take advantage of this program," said Scott Carroll, sanitary district general manager.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
A kitchen fire broke out Thursday at The Arches restaurant in Newport Beach but was quickly extinguished, authorities said. A small grease fire began about 1:27 p.m. inside a grease duct at the restaurant's new location, 1617 Westcliff Drive, said Newport Beach Fire Department spokeswoman Jennifer Schulz. Firefighters put out the fire about 20 minutes after it started, Schulz said. Some 20 patrons were in the restaurant and smoke was coming out of the roof, but the smoke did not go into the dining area, said Arches employee Brice Mirtle.
LOCAL
February 2, 2010
A sewage spill in the Bayside Coves area of Newport Bay on Tuesday caused the Orange County Health Care Agency to close off a quarter-mile area to swimmers and divers, said Larry Honeybourne, program manager with the agency. The city of Newport Beach responded about 11:30 a.m. to a spill caused by one of Vons Pavilions grease interceptors. The plumbing device overflowed, causing grease and sewage to spill into the parking lot, run off to the storm drain and then spill into the Bayside Coves area.
LOCAL
By Kelly Strodl | August 23, 2007
Orange County Heath Care Agency officials have continued the closure of 100 feet of shoreline in the Newport Harbor after what they are calling a small sewage spill earlier this week. Authorities closed the beach after being notified of a grease backup at the Newport Landing Restaurant Sunday afternoon, authorities said. Grease blocking a private sewer line from the restaurant caused a spill of between 5 and 50 gallons of sewage, said Deanne Thompson, spokeswoman for the agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jessie Brunner | June 21, 2007
For the second time, 17-year-old Kristina Clark of Costa Mesa and 14-year-old Hailey Tweter of Newport Coast are vying for the attention of one man. This time around, that man is the handsome and greasy Danny Zuko, and the two Orange County High School of the Arts students are starring opposite one another in the Musical Theatre Academy's production of "Grease," opening tomorrow. Kristina, who has been with the theater group for 12 years, and Hailey, now in her fourth year, both have a flair for the dramatic.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 13, 2005
The Costa Mesa Sanitary District board unanimously approved higher rates for trash collection and sewer services Thursday, district assistant manager Thomas Fauth said. Rates were raised to cover higher volumes of garbage collected and to meet a mandate from environmental regulators to keep grease out of sewer lines. "We've experienced a significant increase in the amount of trash collected," Fauth said. In the last five years, the volume of trash hauled by the district has gone up from about 35,000 tons annually to more than 42,000, Fauth said.
NEWS
June 18, 2005
Andrew Edwards Costa Mesa restaurateurs and residents could wind up sharing the costs of keeping grease out of local sewer pipes. The Costa Mesa Sanitary District's board is set to consider billing Costa Mesans later this summer. The board is not scheduled to vote on the proposed fees until August, but if approved, fees will go into effect retroactive to July 1, sanitary district assistant manager Thomas Fauth said. The new fees would be due at the same time as property taxes.
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