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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 11, 2014
It's official: There is no more illegally placed decomposed granite in Fairview Park. Hired crews from an environmental consulting firm recently finished the dusty job of fully removing the dirt-like material from two trails in the Costa Mesa park's southeastern quadrant. The work was performed under the close supervision of a biologist because the matter caught the attention of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). A city study confirmed that the two trails encroached on a tiny corner of a vernal pool - a type of temporary wetland - and hurt the habitat of the tiny San Diego fairy shrimp, an endangered species.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 27, 2013
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has directed the city of Costa Mesa to remove two man-made trails threatening a tiny endangered species that breeds in the seasonal ponds at Fairview Park. Both trails, located along the 208-acre park's southeastern edge next to Parsons Field and Estancia High School, were topped in the summer with decomposed granite, which the federal agency fears will harm the San Diego fairy shrimp this winter. The work was done without the city's permission, possibly by volunteers unaware of the area's biological significance.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 13, 2013
Work to remove a trail made of decomposed granite at Fairview Park started Friday, according to published reports. A Huntington Beach environmental consulting firm was hired to remove the unpermitted trail work, which possibly harmed the habitat of an endangered species, officials said. For about $14,000, Endemic Environmental Services will remove by hand the two decomposed granite trails that encroached on a vernal pool, potentially affecting the San Diego fairy shrimp's habitat.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 14, 2006
The closest thing to a silent spot in the county exists a few blocks away from South Coast Plaza, tucked behind a deli and between a pair of stoic black buildings. In a courtyard that stretches over a little more than one acre, the churning water from a pair of fountains provides the main source of noise. The water trickles and flows through a snakelike stream, finally disappearing beneath a huge, white triangle of granite. On the sides, redwood trees, cacti and a grassy knoll offer glimpses of plant life.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 24, 2013
Although crews this week have removed truckloads of unapproved sediment placed on two trails in Fairview Park in Costa Mesa, the job isn't quite complete. City officials had hoped to have the project done by now, but after some delays, they now expect to finish by the end of this week. The work remains within the nearly $14,000 budget, Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz said Tuesday. The two trails - topped sometime this summer with decomposed granite without Costa Mesa City Hall's permission - are in the 208-acre park's southeastern quadrant.
NEWS
September 2, 2004
KAREN WIGHT Creating a kitchen is stressful. There are a hundred decisions to make along the way, and all of them are important -- and expensive. Some preferences are easy: gas or electric? With only two options, you can't mind-wrestle forever. On the opposite end of the spectrum are the hundreds of choices available for countertops. If your heart is set on stone, fasten your seat belt; the road to decision can be bumpy. Granite is one of the hardest stones and can stand plenty of wear and tear.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | January 31, 2014
Costa Mesa Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger announced Friday that he plans to meet with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents and tell them what he knows about decomposed granite trails that damaged sensitive habitat when they mysteriously appeared in Fairview Park. "I have asked the city attorney's office to contact U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to arrange for me to talk to its agents about what I know about this incident," Mensinger said in a statement released Friday. This summer, two trails within the 208-acre park were topped with decomposed granite without city permission.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
According to a recent Daily Pilot article, "Feds order removal of granite paths at Fairview," Nov. 27, Costa Mesa is required to remove the decomposed granite path from Fairview Park, as directed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The removal is going to be expensive. The person, or persons, who made the path are not known, and an environmental group is offering $500 for the identity of the culprit, or culprits. I would urge the City Council to also post a $500 prize leading to the identification of the people who made the path.
NEWS
March 10, 2005
Teachers today have a difficult task. Charged with stirring and educating the minds of adolescents, they face tough odds and competition from all quarters. Television, video games and the Internet are but a few distractions that detour the average teen from minding his or her studies and actually learning something useful. To accomplish the mission, some teachers may resort to shock value. It's hard to know what Corona del Mar High School teacher Dan Granite was hoping to accomplish by showing the movie "Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc," to his seventh-grade history class.
NEWS
March 28, 2003
Deirdre Newman The city is a step closer to paving a slice of paradise and putting in a concrete trail to provide more access to Fairview Park. On Wednesday, the Parks and Recreation Commission gave its stamp of approval to a conceptual plan for a multipurpose trail. The trail will be 8 feet wide with a 4-foot wide decomposed granite trail next to it for hikers. The concrete portion is geared toward walkers, roller-bladers and others who don't feel comfortable navigating the granite and dirt trails in the park.
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | January 31, 2014
Costa Mesa Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger announced Friday that he plans to meet with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents and tell them what he knows about decomposed granite trails that damaged sensitive habitat when they mysteriously appeared in Fairview Park. "I have asked the city attorney's office to contact U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to arrange for me to talk to its agents about what I know about this incident," Mensinger said in a statement released Friday. This summer, two trails within the 208-acre park were topped with decomposed granite without city permission.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 11, 2014
It's official: There is no more illegally placed decomposed granite in Fairview Park. Hired crews from an environmental consulting firm recently finished the dusty job of fully removing the dirt-like material from two trails in the Costa Mesa park's southeastern quadrant. The work was performed under the close supervision of a biologist because the matter caught the attention of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). A city study confirmed that the two trails encroached on a tiny corner of a vernal pool - a type of temporary wetland - and hurt the habitat of the tiny San Diego fairy shrimp, an endangered species.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 24, 2013
Although crews this week have removed truckloads of unapproved sediment placed on two trails in Fairview Park in Costa Mesa, the job isn't quite complete. City officials had hoped to have the project done by now, but after some delays, they now expect to finish by the end of this week. The work remains within the nearly $14,000 budget, Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz said Tuesday. The two trails - topped sometime this summer with decomposed granite without Costa Mesa City Hall's permission - are in the 208-acre park's southeastern quadrant.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 13, 2013
Work to remove a trail made of decomposed granite at Fairview Park started Friday, according to published reports. A Huntington Beach environmental consulting firm was hired to remove the unpermitted trail work, which possibly harmed the habitat of an endangered species, officials said. For about $14,000, Endemic Environmental Services will remove by hand the two decomposed granite trails that encroached on a vernal pool, potentially affecting the San Diego fairy shrimp's habitat.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
According to a recent Daily Pilot article, "Feds order removal of granite paths at Fairview," Nov. 27, Costa Mesa is required to remove the decomposed granite path from Fairview Park, as directed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The removal is going to be expensive. The person, or persons, who made the path are not known, and an environmental group is offering $500 for the identity of the culprit, or culprits. I would urge the City Council to also post a $500 prize leading to the identification of the people who made the path.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 27, 2013
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has directed the city of Costa Mesa to remove two man-made trails threatening a tiny endangered species that breeds in the seasonal ponds at Fairview Park. Both trails, located along the 208-acre park's southeastern edge next to Parsons Field and Estancia High School, were topped in the summer with decomposed granite, which the federal agency fears will harm the San Diego fairy shrimp this winter. The work was done without the city's permission, possibly by volunteers unaware of the area's biological significance.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | September 11, 2013
A Fairview Park activist group is offering a $500 reward for information leading to the identity of those responsible for laying down material that encroached upon a federally protected habitat. Friends of Fairview Nature Park is seeking the people or entities responsible for the recently un-permitted placement of decomposed granite (DG) onto two trails within the 208-acre park's southeastern edge, near Jim Scott Stadium and Parsons Field. A portion of the DG, according to a city-commissioned report, affected one of Fairview Park's vernal pools, a wetland-like habitat that contains the San Diego fairy shrimp - an endangered species - and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | September 10, 2011
Sue and William "Bill" Pollard last spoke to their son, U.S. Army Specialist Justin Pollard, on Christmas 2003. "We talked about how he was coming around to the tail end of his tour, and I asked him if he had any plans for when he got home, and if he thought that being in Iraq had been worthwhile," Sue Pollard said. "He said to me, 'I truly believe in the reason why we are here and that our being here is for the greater good. This is where I need to be.'" Five days later, he was killed by friendly fire in Iraq.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | August 12, 2011
HUNTINGTON BEACH - A guided tour of Robert Rizzo's home Friday offered an unusual peek into the affluent lifestyle he built while running blue-collar Bell. When he lived in the house near Huntington Beach's City Hall, the former city manager - who now stands accused of public corruption - walked on travertine flooring, looked through etched glass windows, passed through leaded glass doors and ate in a formal dining room beneath a coffered ceiling. He could choose between a steam shower or bathing under a chandelier in a bathroom lined in travertine, granite and marble.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 14, 2006
The closest thing to a silent spot in the county exists a few blocks away from South Coast Plaza, tucked behind a deli and between a pair of stoic black buildings. In a courtyard that stretches over a little more than one acre, the churning water from a pair of fountains provides the main source of noise. The water trickles and flows through a snakelike stream, finally disappearing beneath a huge, white triangle of granite. On the sides, redwood trees, cacti and a grassy knoll offer glimpses of plant life.
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