Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsGovernment
IN THE NEWS

Government

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 12, 2011
I am both amazed and amused at the continuing controversy surrounding the Ronald Reagan statue in Newport Beach. The Reagan statue fits perfectly in this image-conscious, cliché-driven, self-contradicting city. The family values president was divorced, remarried and estranged from his children and grandchildren for extended periods of time. The opponent of big government increased the size of state government while governor of California and the size of the federal government while president.
NEWS
July 15, 2011
It is a warm Saturday morning, and I am coming down Placentia Avenue, when, lo and behold, a huge sign probably costing the taxpayers thousands of dollars bellows out something of this sort: "We are using your tax dollars wisely by preserving this park. " Let us start with this observation: I have yet to see a lazy government employee use any tax money wisely. Now let me tell you about the beautiful natural park that existed before the so-called servants who spend our hard-earned money wisely began rolling out their heavy equipment that cost all of us thousands, actually desecrating this park that actually was the reason some bought homes in that area.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | June 11, 2011
When former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger first took office he promised to address the out-of-control worker's compensation system, and he did. Unfortunately, after making progress on about 15% of the difficulties — the ones that were the easiest and least controversial — he basically declared victory, and sailed off to do other good deeds. Recently I read that Gov. Jerry Brown said he would reduce the size and expense of state government by eliminating 37 state panels, advisory boards and agencies.
NEWS
March 12, 2005
Last week, the Supreme Court heard arguments on the legality of maintaining displays of the Ten Commandments on government property -- courtrooms, in particular. Among the arguments bandied about in the media for keeping the displays has been the assertion that the Ten Commandments reflect the historical makeup of the country, but not the spiritual -- that they are an artifact and nothing more. Does the display of the Ten Commandments in public settings -- meaning government and school buildings -- necessarily imply an endorsement of Christianity over other religions?
NEWS
By Marie Kolasinski | November 5, 2009
What happens to the fairgrounds could be a deciding factor in the fate of our nation. Do the people own the fairgrounds? Or does a phony entity that calls itself the state own the fairgrounds? America is rushing toward her day of doom. She has played the arrogant dictator, bringing fear to the world instead of mercy and justice. Out of the ashes of her doom, will there rise a new nation with liberty and justice for all? Or will we be worse off than a Third World country? Will apathetic America awaken too late or will what happens here with the fairgrounds be a wake-up call for all?
NEWS
August 24, 2009
Regarding ?Keep government out of the marketplace,? It?s a Gray Area, Aug. 16: Dear Jim, You missed the boat with your conclusion that the government should be kept out of the marketplace. I will remind you that our nation is suffering from its worst economic downturn since the Great Depression because our government was so blindly inactive in the world of capitalism. Ever since Ronald Reagan took over the reins of executive power, he, with congressional approval, began deregulating the major financial institutions ?
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | August 23, 2008
A big question of our day, and one of the largest issues that will affect the peace of the world is can people keep religion and government separated? For the next decade or two, a major part of the issue of whether the world will be at peace or at war will be determined by the answer. Most people in the world hold religious beliefs of some form. That is certainly a positive thing, and for people to derive morals from religious tenets and teachings is natural and appropriate.
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | July 29, 2007
To state the obvious, bureaucracies are found at all levels of society, including businesses, churches, law firms, universities, hospitals, charitable organizations and government. And it is virtually always the inclination of bureaucracies to continue to expand in size and power, and for bureaucrats to avoid responsibility for their actions and inactions. Not only are governments not an exception to these natural inclinations, most of the time they are the skilled leaders. Today, it is so unusual for someone in government to recommend government be reduced in size or power that when it happens it results in headlines.
NEWS
April 3, 2008
GOP presidential hopeful Sen. John McCain stopped by Orange County last week to raise money and participate in a roundtable discussion with Latino small business leaders. While here he made a policy speech about the mortgage crisis basically spelling out a laissez-faire approach to the problem, arguing he is “committed to the principle that it is not the duty of government to bail out and reward those who act irresponsibly, whether they are big banks or small borrowers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | April 14, 2014
Last summer in the Segerstrom Center for the Arts' Summer at the Center program, which provides musical training for at-risk teenagers, the instructor taught the class a medley of songs with wordless choruses: "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye," "Gettin' Jiggy Wit It" and the like. If the program needs additional help this summer, perhaps Ms. McGovern can step in as the cool new teacher. McGovern - Maureen, that is - delivered a wordless tour de force Saturday at the center's Samueli Theater, where she played a three-night engagement with singer-songwriter Jimmy Webb.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | April 8, 2014
To tweak a time-honored line from Charles Dickens, it's the best of songs and the worst of songs. Pop music is full of love-it-or-hate-it milestones, but perhaps no work has inspired more polarized reactions than "MacArthur Park," the seven-minute mini-symphony that Jimmy Webb wrote in the late 1960s about the Los Angeles landmark, a shattered romance and a cake left dissolving in a downpour. Humorist Dave Barry, who took a survey about least favorite tunes, declared that his respondents named Webb's opus "the worst song in modern history.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
It was with some amusement that I recently read the letter to editor regarding the "doers" on the Costa Mesa City Council ("City Council now has some doers," March 26). M.H. Millard says, "Now we have some council members who are running the city like a business. " But let's really think about that concept. A government, be it on the municipal, county, state or national level, is not a business and should never, ever be expected to run like one. What it comes down to is profit versus people.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | March 13, 2014
Most members of the Costa Mesa Charter Committee gave a thumbs-up Wednesday night to sending the draft of the charter they created to the City Council for further review. The 13-member committee met about 15 times over 10 months, debating all the way to make the six-page, constitution-like document a reality. After the council reviews and possibly alters the document, voters will probably get a chance to accept or deny it at the ballot box in November. On Wednesday, 10 of the charter committee members found the paper satisfactory enough to send it on. Committee member Harold Weitzberg dissented; members Mary Ann O'Connell and Bill Fancher were absent.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | August 7, 2013
House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy briefly laid out a Republican agenda that touched on tax reform, energy policy and changes to regulatory agencies during a visit Tuesday to Newport Beach. "We're in the middle of a philosophical battle that's been a bigger divide than we've ever seen," the Bakersfield Republican said. He said the Republican-controlled House has recently struggled to make progress, but he blamed the Senate, where Democrats have a majority, for not taking up House bills.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | August 2, 2013
The following question is meant to be practical, not philosophical, and your answer is important. Do you want unlimited government? That would mean that government would effectively take responsibility for deciding and controlling all aspects of our lives. Honestly, I don't think I have ever encountered anyone who wants that. One reason of course, is that unlimited government doesn't work. For example, the governments in China, Cuba and the former Soviet Union took away many personal freedoms, but they still had some limitations on government, and even then their systems were stagnant.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | May 3, 2013
The road to success for communities struggling with poverty is generally not hard to find, or even to travel. All it requires is a firm reliance upon yourself instead of government. To drive that point home, candidly ask yourself what government has actually done for you in the last five years. Yes governments make promises, but have they kept you safe? Educated your children well? Provided you with a good job, or any job at all? Provided you with good health care? Probably not to any satisfactory degree.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | April 18, 2013
Should Costa Mesa have a charter? How should such a city constitution be created? A City Council session scheduled for 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 77 Fair Drive, is expected to address these and other questions. A news release from the city said it has grappled with whether Costa Mesa, a general-law city, should draft a charter and whether by a commission of 15 voter-elected members or a committee of appointees, the number of which and process of choosing would also need to be determined.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna and Lauren Williams | April 16, 2013
Local police and  FBI  agents looked for answers -- and explosives -- in a Costa Mesa home Monday after 52-year-old Kevin Harris apparently blew himself up in a blast that shocked the quiet, suburban neighborhood where he lived alone. His mother, Carol Harris, 82, said he had been diagnosed with a mental disorder, possibly schizophrenia. She said that she hadn't seen her son in three years and that the last time they spoke, he told her was disconnecting his phone because he was getting unwanted calls.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | April 13, 2013
Since my last column about health care appeared in this space, the system has continued to gallop toward disaster. Today, under the federal government's "leadership," we often pay several times more in the United States for the same prescription drugs that are sold in other countries; an average MRI here costs $1,080, while it only costs $510 in Germany; and doctors here charge twice as much for hip replacement surgery as do doctors in Australia....
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|