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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | March 16, 2012
A column I wrote earlier this month regarding the disparity in fundraising among Newport-Mesa public schools touched a nerve with many readers, so I thought it worth revisiting the topic ("How can public schools compete for donations?" March 4). I previously pointed out that public schools in wealthier neighborhoods in Newport Beach benefit from foundations and PTA activities that raise hundreds of thousands of dollars annually, whereas some of the schools in lower socio-economic zones in Costa Mesa have very little access to outside fundraising.
NEWS
By Rhea Mahbubani | June 11, 2013
The Irvine City Council voted late Tuesday in favor of maintaining funding for the Irvine Barclay Theatre, to much applause. City Manager Sean Joyce had originally suggested reducing the funds for the organization from $925,000 to $425,000. Mayor Steven Choi and Mayor Pro Tem Jeffrey Lalloway cast the dissenting votes. Douglas Rankin, president of the 25-year-old Barclay, said if the budget had been cut, it would have been "somewhere between completely adverse and catastrophic.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | May 21, 2011
Amid all the back and forth sniping between City Council members lately, city leaders and the community found common ground this week when Costa Mesa agreed to continue partial funding for one of its after-school programs. The City Council on Tuesday agreed to fund 40% of the Recreation on Campus for Kids Afterschool Program, or R.O.C.K.S. The program costs nearly $230,000 annually to run, most of that going to staffing, which requires one adult per 20 children. R.O.C.K.S.
NEWS
November 23, 2007
Newport Beach Councilwoman Leslie Daigle wants residents to contact their Washington representatives about funding a multimillion dollar harbor cleanup. Newport Harbor hasn?t been thoroughly dredged in more than 70 years. Boaters complain of running aground, and an estimated 900,000 cubic yards of sediment need to be removed. The project could cost up to $18 million over the next 20 years, according to a city estimate. The city met with an Army Corps of Engineers representative last month to identify possible sources of funding to continue the $30-million project.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | April 30, 2011
COSTA MESA — Though widely reported and talked about openly, Orange County's organized labor came out officially as the funding source for the Repair Costa Mesa ad campaign this week with a fictitious business name notice in the Daily Pilot. "There had to be a way to organize that group and organize the money," said Jennifer Muir, spokeswoman for the Orange County Employees Assn., which ran the notice in Tuesday's Pilot. "That's why it's being done, that's why it's through us. It doesn't make sense for a Greg Ridge or Sandy Genis to take on full financial responsibility or control.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | April 26, 2014
On a typical day at Harbor View Elementary School in Corona del Mar, students use iPads to complete spelling exercises, learn math facts and work on reading activities. The iPads were paid for by the Harbor View Dads group, a fundraising organization that spent several years raising enough money to purchase 172 devices for the students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Whittier Elementary is just a short drive up the freeway in Costa Mesa, but in many respects is worlds away from getting the technology the students at Harbor View have at their fingertips, said Patrick DeVusser, a fourth-grade teacher at Whittier.
NEWS
June 28, 2008
Money to dredge Upper Newport Bay could evaporate as early as August, and the city might need about $14 million to clean it up. Because the waterway falls under federal jurisdiction, this sounds like a job for Rep. John Campbell. Problem is, Campbell thinks there’s only two ways to solve the dilemma. Either he convinces the feds to hand over the keys to the bay and throw in about $12 million into the deal to clean it up, or he just seeks federal funding for the project. Newport Beach officials, meanwhile, are talking about throwing in a few million of their own money to jump-start some matching federal funds.
NEWS
March 11, 2003
ON THE AGENDA NEWPORT HARBOR HIGH POOL The swimming pool at Newport Harbor High School has posed health and safety concerns because of its deteriorating condition and, as a result, must be either repaired immediately or shut down. Since repairs to the pool fall under priority six of Measure A, and Measure A construction at the school sites is only expected to go through the priority four level, the school is seeking other methods of funding. The two-phase project will require about $1 million.
NEWS
By Keith Curry | March 21, 2014
As a financial advisor to governments, your job is to tell sometimes hard truths about the financial implications of public plans. Governments ignore these financial consequences at the peril of taxpayers and long-term financial health. Unfortunately, the California High-Speed Rail Authority's financial plan, as it is currently conceived, ignores some hard truths. It would be a slow-moving train wreck that would do economic damage to California for generations. I should know.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | April 26, 2014
On a typical day at Harbor View Elementary School in Corona del Mar, students use iPads to complete spelling exercises, learn math facts and work on reading activities. The iPads were paid for by the Harbor View Dads group, a fundraising organization that spent several years raising enough money to purchase 172 devices for the students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Whittier Elementary is just a short drive up the freeway in Costa Mesa, but in many respects is worlds away from getting the technology the students at Harbor View have at their fingertips, said Patrick DeVusser, a fourth-grade teacher at Whittier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014
Barry Haarde, a hemophiliac with HIV, set off Sunday from Newport Beach on his third cross-country bike trip. The cyclist will be raising funds for Save One Life, a nonprofit that supports those with bleeding disorders. He also suffers from a liver disease and underwent a knee replacement 14 years ago. Haarde plans to take a nearly 3,000-mile route to Savannah, Ga., over a 27-day period. - Emily Foxhall Twitter: @emfoxhall
NEWS
By Keith Curry | March 21, 2014
As a financial advisor to governments, your job is to tell sometimes hard truths about the financial implications of public plans. Governments ignore these financial consequences at the peril of taxpayers and long-term financial health. Unfortunately, the California High-Speed Rail Authority's financial plan, as it is currently conceived, ignores some hard truths. It would be a slow-moving train wreck that would do economic damage to California for generations. I should know.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | March 18, 2014
The city is looking into taking over certain operational aspects of the Costa Mesa Senior Center in an attempt to keep the organization's doors open. The center's budget problems came to light after Costa Mesa published an audit in January predicting that the nonprofit organization's general fund would run dry by June. After the report surfaced, four of the nine senior center board members met with city staff to discuss the audit and ways to improve the facility's finances. The city offered to shore up the dwindling budget by taking over staffing, payroll costs and rent, senior center board President Judy Lindsay announced during the board's meeting Tuesday morning.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | March 12, 2014
The final act has begun for Balboa Village Theatre supporters, who received a firm deadline Tuesday to meet certain requirements or risk the long-shuttered theater's chance for an encore. It's a tale that has unfolded over decades. The Balboa Peninsula venue, which originally opened as the Ritz Theatre in 1928, has been closed since 1992. Setbacks have been numerous, but the theater's foundation told the Newport Beach City Council during its study session and regular meeting Tuesday that residents still hoped for the stage to be lighted once again.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | March 5, 2014
Flagship programs, which allow students to specialize in a specific subject from kindergarten through graduation, could be implemented in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District by next school year. The Costa Mesa, Corona del Mar, Estancia and Newport Harbor high school principals presented their eight respective flagship programs, featuring both art and academic pathways, during a special meeting of the school board Tuesday afternoon. While the principals hope to begin implementation by the 2014-15 school year, much remains to be figured out, said Chuck Hinman, assistant superintendent of secondary education.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | March 1, 2014
New locker rooms and restrooms will be built at the Corona del Mar High School pool, just one of many back-burner projects benefiting from extra city funding recently made available. The $338,000 contribution to the Newport-Mesa Unified School District, requested by City Manager Dave Kiff, draws from higher-than-expected revenues in Newport Beach this fiscal year, coupled with last year's budget surplus. The City Council on Tuesday appropriated more than $14 million to help pay for a wide array of improvements throughout the city, such as the locker rooms.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 8, 2014
The Fairview Developmental Center in Costa Mesa stands to lose its Medicaid funding for failing to comply with federal standards outlined by the state health department during an investigation conducted last year. The state-run hospital, which houses 322 developmentally disabled adults, is at risk of losing certification and Medicaid funding after the California Department of Public Health last year found deficiencies involving patient care identified as "immediate jeopardy situations," according to a news release.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 7, 2014
It was a lavish evening at the posh Center Club, a Gatsby-themed affair 10 months in the making. The private, South Coast Metro venue was replete with flappers, generous silent-auction gift baskets, live music, a faux casino and hors d'oeuvres. Nearly 200 people attended the party last October, hoping it would be a much-needed fundraising boost for the Costa Mesa Senior Center. It wasn't. The party, the center's first fundraiser in eight years, cost nearly $45,000 and raised some $43,000 - a net loss of about $2,000.
NEWS
By Keith D. Curry and By Keith D. Curry | December 6, 2013
As 2013 draws to a close it is time to pause and look back at what we have been able to accomplish together as a community. This was truly a transformational year for our city. We concluded an agreement to extend important protections in our unique Airport Settlement Agreement. This will ensure our community is protected for the next generation. Our award-winning Civic Center has created a public space that visitors from around the world are coming to see. The new Civic Green welcomes concertgoers, hundreds walk or take their dogs to the park and the library expansion is already filling up each day. The new City Hall also enabled us to go paperless and reduce printing by more than 22,000 pages per month.
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