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LOCAL
July 2, 2008
A man received minor injuries after walking through a plate-glass window during a factory’s hazardous waste scare Wednesday afternoon. No one else was injured in the evacuation of J. D. Lincoln Inc., a local company that manufactures adhesives and composite materials. Costa Mesa Fire Department responded to a call from the company at 851 W. 18th St. when a 300-gallon barrel of hypoxy began producing white smoke. Businesses surrounding John D. Lincoln were vacated even though the hazard, which was caused by overheating, was contained.
NEWS
June 20, 2005
Andrew Edwards The first business to take up shop in Costa Mesa's Triangle Square since Niketown left could be up and running as early as this week. Pending a successful health inspection, a Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory franchise could be ready to sell lattes and smoothies to Triangle Square patrons on Thursday, said Michael Wong, one of five partners backing the franchise. The new Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory is set to open on the mall's upper level, an almost-deserted zone that used to be home to Triangle Square's food court.
NEWS
August 11, 2002
This has been a week of discoveries at the Wight House. The most improbable of which has been that the entire family can rally around something as simple as a jelly bean. Discoveries of greater magnitude exist, no doubt. But none have been as humorous or as unexpected as the world of "the original gourmet jelly bean." And since an amazing amount of bean trivia has filled my brain, I feel obligated to share the nuances of the Jelly Belly world with you. First of all, if you ever find yourself in Fairfield, I'm sorry.
FEATURES
By Jessie Brunner Daily Pilot | March 24, 2007
Spending the final years of World War II working 12-hour days on a lathe as a slave laborer in a munitions factory turned out to be a blessing for Leon Leyson. That factory was owned by Nazi industrialist Oskar Schindler, and that job saved his life. Though the war is an all-too-familiar subject for many of the members of the Newport Harbor Exchange Club, about 50 men listened attentively as Leyson ? the youngest survivor of Schindler's list ? shared his story at their weekly luncheon Thursday.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | February 12, 2009
A group of World of Warcraft players planning their next attack online may look like pure fun and games, from the chat-room banter to the orcs and elves they send into battle. But to UCI researcher Walt Scacchi, a senior research scientist at UCI’s Institute of Software Research, it just might look like a business meeting. “They may spend hours strategizing in chat rooms or looking at recordings of previous game-play sessions,” Scacchi said. “They’re helping to educate themselves on how to be a better team, more effective.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | December 14, 2005
Forty years ago, my father was the plant manager for a large company in Gardena, Calif., that manufactured mirrors. Many of the factories in the area employed people from Mexico and Central America who were here illegally. In that part of Los Angeles County, hiring illegal immigrants was and still is a common practice. My father would describe the raids on these plants in great detail. In the mid-1960s, every so often, the Immigration and Naturalization Service would conduct raids on the factories.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Serna | November 24, 2009
It was a Friday afternoon, and the workers at the T3 Motion factory in Costa Mesa were quietly busy, drilling, fastening and calibrating the latest models of the business’ personal transportation vehicles. Off to one side, near the factory door, Ki Nam started up the company’s prototype electrical vehicle, about the size of a Smart car. After the electrical motor hummed to a start, Nam slowly reversed ... right into the frame for one of his T3 vehicles. “Oops, I didn’t even see that,” Nam said with a chuckle, before driving out the factory doors.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | June 17, 2006
In 1929, at the age of 15, my father escaped a chaotic home in the Catskill Mountains of New York by hitching a ride with his uncle to New York City. His uncle was sympathetic to my dad, whose chief complaint was the way he was treated by his stepmother. On the way into the city, my father's uncle gave him $200. In 1929, that was a small fortune. My dad landed in Brooklyn and found work right away in a bookstore. He worked hard for several months, and one day, a regular customer named Al Spertus took notice of how hard he was working.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | March 25, 2011
In my long career as a journalist — much of it spent as a business reporter — I covered many stories involving job losses. These stories inevitably contained lots of figures: the number of employees cut, percentage of workforce terminated, expected savings from payroll reductions. The requisite press releases were always filled with euphemisms. Workers weren't fired; they were laid off. Companies didn't shrink; they downsized. Cutbacks were never the result of mistakes made; they were a response to competitive pressures.
NEWS
February 3, 2005
JOSEPH N. BELL I suspect that all of us have a handful of places or events in our lives that leave such an indelible impression that they are never very far from our consciousness. One such place for me is the Nazi death factory called Auschwitz. It has been much on my mind this past week as both the print media and television have been full of remembrances of this place on the 60th anniversary of its liberation by the Russian army. Although my memories come from a visit long after the carnage that took place at Auschwitz, they are nonetheless vivid.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | March 8, 2012
Songwriters trained through the OC Hit Factory's music camps may lack an extensive resume, but their passion for music is anything but amateur, the record label's founder said this week. "Kids don't have the barriers that we, adults, do," Thomas Barsoe said. "They just pour their hearts out into the music. The raw material they create is better than some of the songs I've written myself. " Barsoe, a Danish pop star whose music has received international acclaim, launched the songwriting camp about a year ago with the goal of connecting talented songwriters of all ages and music producers on meaningful, viable projects.
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | March 25, 2011
In my long career as a journalist — much of it spent as a business reporter — I covered many stories involving job losses. These stories inevitably contained lots of figures: the number of employees cut, percentage of workforce terminated, expected savings from payroll reductions. The requisite press releases were always filled with euphemisms. Workers weren't fired; they were laid off. Companies didn't shrink; they downsized. Cutbacks were never the result of mistakes made; they were a response to competitive pressures.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Serna | November 24, 2009
It was a Friday afternoon, and the workers at the T3 Motion factory in Costa Mesa were quietly busy, drilling, fastening and calibrating the latest models of the business’ personal transportation vehicles. Off to one side, near the factory door, Ki Nam started up the company’s prototype electrical vehicle, about the size of a Smart car. After the electrical motor hummed to a start, Nam slowly reversed ... right into the frame for one of his T3 vehicles. “Oops, I didn’t even see that,” Nam said with a chuckle, before driving out the factory doors.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | February 12, 2009
A group of World of Warcraft players planning their next attack online may look like pure fun and games, from the chat-room banter to the orcs and elves they send into battle. But to UCI researcher Walt Scacchi, a senior research scientist at UCI’s Institute of Software Research, it just might look like a business meeting. “They may spend hours strategizing in chat rooms or looking at recordings of previous game-play sessions,” Scacchi said. “They’re helping to educate themselves on how to be a better team, more effective.
LOCAL
July 2, 2008
A man received minor injuries after walking through a plate-glass window during a factory’s hazardous waste scare Wednesday afternoon. No one else was injured in the evacuation of J. D. Lincoln Inc., a local company that manufactures adhesives and composite materials. Costa Mesa Fire Department responded to a call from the company at 851 W. 18th St. when a 300-gallon barrel of hypoxy began producing white smoke. Businesses surrounding John D. Lincoln were vacated even though the hazard, which was caused by overheating, was contained.
FEATURES
By Jessie Brunner Daily Pilot | March 24, 2007
Spending the final years of World War II working 12-hour days on a lathe as a slave laborer in a munitions factory turned out to be a blessing for Leon Leyson. That factory was owned by Nazi industrialist Oskar Schindler, and that job saved his life. Though the war is an all-too-familiar subject for many of the members of the Newport Harbor Exchange Club, about 50 men listened attentively as Leyson ? the youngest survivor of Schindler's list ? shared his story at their weekly luncheon Thursday.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | June 17, 2006
In 1929, at the age of 15, my father escaped a chaotic home in the Catskill Mountains of New York by hitching a ride with his uncle to New York City. His uncle was sympathetic to my dad, whose chief complaint was the way he was treated by his stepmother. On the way into the city, my father's uncle gave him $200. In 1929, that was a small fortune. My dad landed in Brooklyn and found work right away in a bookstore. He worked hard for several months, and one day, a regular customer named Al Spertus took notice of how hard he was working.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | December 14, 2005
Forty years ago, my father was the plant manager for a large company in Gardena, Calif., that manufactured mirrors. Many of the factories in the area employed people from Mexico and Central America who were here illegally. In that part of Los Angeles County, hiring illegal immigrants was and still is a common practice. My father would describe the raids on these plants in great detail. In the mid-1960s, every so often, the Immigration and Naturalization Service would conduct raids on the factories.
NEWS
June 20, 2005
Andrew Edwards The first business to take up shop in Costa Mesa's Triangle Square since Niketown left could be up and running as early as this week. Pending a successful health inspection, a Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory franchise could be ready to sell lattes and smoothies to Triangle Square patrons on Thursday, said Michael Wong, one of five partners backing the franchise. The new Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory is set to open on the mall's upper level, an almost-deserted zone that used to be home to Triangle Square's food court.
NEWS
February 3, 2005
JOSEPH N. BELL I suspect that all of us have a handful of places or events in our lives that leave such an indelible impression that they are never very far from our consciousness. One such place for me is the Nazi death factory called Auschwitz. It has been much on my mind this past week as both the print media and television have been full of remembrances of this place on the 60th anniversary of its liberation by the Russian army. Although my memories come from a visit long after the carnage that took place at Auschwitz, they are nonetheless vivid.
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