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Energy Crisis

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NEWS
June 16, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- It won't solve the energy crisis, but the city's business owners can get emergency electrical generators quicker after City Council members approved an emergency ordinance this week. So far, businesses wanting to install such generators had to apply for a use permit and go through public hearings before the city's Planning Commission. Under the new ordinance, which took effect immediately, Planning Director Patty Temple has the authority to approve such requests.
NEWS
June 19, 2001
Recently, Newport Harbor Area Chamber of Commerce staff member Doug Stuckey and I headed to Sacramento with a group of Orange County business leaders to lobby on behalf of business. As our plane landed, I could already feel myself getting excited about talking face to face with legislators about important business issues such as workers' compensation, important infrastructure needs and unwarranted taxes. However, as I would soon find out, this was not to be. Our first stop was at the California Chamber of Commerce Legislative Conference to hear Bob Woodward, of Watergate fame, discuss the national political landscape.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Paul Clinton Republican gubernatorial challenger Bill Simon Jr. emphasized his pro-business platform, promised to roll back what he said were onerous regulations and criticized Gov. Gray Davis' handling of the energy crisis and budget during a speech in Newport Beach on Thursday. "I'm at the right place at the right time," Simon told several hundred business leaders at the exclusive Pacific Club. "It's time for new leadership." The investment banker-turned-politician will face Davis in the Nov. 5 election for the state's top office.
NEWS
October 15, 2002
STATE BUDGET CRISIS: "We've had an incredible budget surplus over the past several years ....It was used to begin too many new programs. Now we don't have the money to fund them." GRAY DAVIS' LEADERSHIP DURING ENERGY CRISIS: "He lacks decisiveness. He was so afraid to do anything that he didn't do anything at all." Maddox also supports further inquiry into the practices of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which has been accused of gaming the market during the summer of 2001 by participating in "ricochet" power-trading schemes.
NEWS
October 26, 2002
THE ENERGY CRISIS: "If these companies want to do business in California, we need to make sure they give us back the millions of dollars they stole from us. In the future, we need to get tougher with these companies and not let them play games with us." LOCAL GOVERNMENT: "The state shouldn't be butting in when it's a local issue. When there is a concern about public health or safety, there is a reason for the state to come into the picture.
NEWS
October 17, 2002
THE WAR ON DRUGS: "End the drug war, starting with implementing Proposition 215 permitting medical use of marijuana." Voters, in 1996, approved the proposition that allowed patients to use marijuana for its medicinal value. LEGALIZING ALL DRUGS: "If you look at illegal drugs, we're losing that war. Smoking is less socially acceptable [because tobacco is legal]." Studier said he thinks the free-market should drive supply and demand for drugs.
NEWS
By Michael Glueck | April 1, 2008
If you eat, you?re probably aware that the price of food is rising. Even if you live by that venerable motto, ?You can?t be too rich or too thin,? you need to be aware that the energy crisis and the food crisis are intertwined. Food requires energy to grow, process, transport and market. Bio-fuels, ?making gas out of corn or whatever,? are increasing in popularity, even if it often takes more energy to produce them than its worth. But don?t worry. There?s a new bio-fuel about to change the world, maybe even save the world.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
After two attempts to bring nuclear power back to California were killed in committee with a party-line vote this week, Assemblyman Chuck DeVore managed to find an unlikely avenue for his plan ? a UC Berkeley academic journal. An article by the lawmaker is featured in this week?s edition of Ecology Law Currents; he argues that lifting California?s 1976 ban on the construction of new nuclear power plants would significantly reduce carbon emissions in the state. ?Nuclear power plants are an efficient, safe, and non-carbon emitting way to meet California?
NEWS
January 25, 2001
It is a clear case of a company wanting to have its cake and eat it too. After agreeing to a contract with Southern California Edison that gave it a 15% discount in exchange for cutting back during power shortages, Newport Beach-based Conexant Systems Inc. has rung up $3 million in fines this month for not reducing its energy consumption. The reason? Company spokeswoman Lisa Briggs said Conexant doesn't "have the type of business that can just be stopped."
NEWS
November 14, 2001
Deirdre Newman UCI CAMPUS -- When the energy crisis brought the California power system to its knees earlier this year, it illustrated the vulnerability of reliance on the power grid and the need to explore alternative fuels. UC Irvine will soon be at the forefront of this exploration, thanks to a $3-million grant from the California Energy Commission. The funds, which UCI's Advanced Power and Energy Program started receiving Friday, will be invested in four new research programs focusing on alternative fuels and distributed power generation, which is putting power directly where it is used instead of channeling it from a centralized power plant.
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NEWS
By Alan Blank and Michael Alexander | July 18, 2008
In an effort to expedite the approval process for large solar-power plants, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher has introduced a bill to Congress that would allow companies to build such plants without having to produce environmental-impact studies. The Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the necessary environmental studies, has a backlog of 130 applications for large-scale solar operations and has not issued a permit to date. “We’re in the middle of a crisis, and the well-being of ordinary people is being damaged greatly by the price of energy,” Rohrabacher said.
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NEWS
April 14, 2008
After two attempts to bring nuclear power back to California were killed in committee with a party-line vote this week, Assemblyman Chuck DeVore managed to find an unlikely avenue for his plan ? a UC Berkeley academic journal. An article by the lawmaker is featured in this week?s edition of Ecology Law Currents; he argues that lifting California?s 1976 ban on the construction of new nuclear power plants would significantly reduce carbon emissions in the state. ?Nuclear power plants are an efficient, safe, and non-carbon emitting way to meet California?
NEWS
By Michael Glueck | April 1, 2008
If you eat, you?re probably aware that the price of food is rising. Even if you live by that venerable motto, ?You can?t be too rich or too thin,? you need to be aware that the energy crisis and the food crisis are intertwined. Food requires energy to grow, process, transport and market. Bio-fuels, ?making gas out of corn or whatever,? are increasing in popularity, even if it often takes more energy to produce them than its worth. But don?t worry. There?s a new bio-fuel about to change the world, maybe even save the world.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
Alicia Robinson They weren't swords, but former weapons did make up the unusual award received by former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev at UC Irvine Tuesday. The first-ever UC Irvine Citizen Peacebuilding Award, made by art professor Gifford Myers from the barrels of guns, was given to Gorbachev for his contributions to world peace and improving the environment. "It is a very important symbol," Gorbachev said through an interpreter.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
Just a couple years ago, Sara Myers spent a good amount of time cramming for political science tests. From January to March 2, Myers tried to cram more hours into the day to rally volunteers and voters onto the John Campbell for state Senate bandwagon. In her short time since graduating from Pepperdine University, she's worked for Bill Simon, then Campbell, then Simon for the recall campaign, and now Campbell again. With Campbell's campaign headquarters on Bay Street and Newport Boulevard having been entirely cleared out Friday, Myers is now preparing for the real race in November.
NEWS
December 8, 2003
Alicia Robinson When California voters go to the polls on March 2, they could see a referendum to block a state law that would require larger businesses to provide health insurance to their workers. Local business owners and organizations said the law is a concern, but mostly as part of a pattern of overall government mandates that are driving up the cost of doing business. "It's kind of like wading out into the ocean and being hit by one wave after another," said Julie Puentes, Orange County Business Council spokeswoman.
NEWS
October 1, 2003
Deirdre Newman After seeing their monthly bills jump an average of $1.44 in July, residents will now see their bills dip by about 32 cents a month. A domino effect enabled the Mesa Consolidated Water District to reduce its rates from 15 cents per billing unit to 13 cents per billing unit. The district's board of directors approved the reduction last week, based on Southern California Edison reducing its electric rates in August. "We're very happy that we can pass these savings along to our customers," said Amanda Gavin, the district's public information coordinator.
NEWS
October 26, 2002
THE ENERGY CRISIS: "If these companies want to do business in California, we need to make sure they give us back the millions of dollars they stole from us. In the future, we need to get tougher with these companies and not let them play games with us." LOCAL GOVERNMENT: "The state shouldn't be butting in when it's a local issue. When there is a concern about public health or safety, there is a reason for the state to come into the picture.
NEWS
October 26, 2002
Deepa Bharath Irvine resident John Kane is in the middle of his first run for any public office. But the 40-year-old software developer, who is running for the 70th Assembly District seat against incumbent John Campbell, says he is out there to give "the voters a choice." The Democrat described himself as an "empathetic individual" who is able to hear all aspects of an issue and not be blinded by ideology. "I'm willing to listen to both sides of a story," he said.
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