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By JIM DE BOOM | July 8, 2006
This week's column comes to you via the Internet from the Kingwing Hot Spring International Hotel in Beijing, where I am with the first of three groups of educators and their families touring Bejiing, Shanghai and several other cities, including visits to elementary and high schools. This week's group includes daughters Stacy and Jodi, son-in-law Zach Drysdale and his mother Vicki, and teachers from Huntington Beach, Seal Beach, the Orange County Department of Education, New York and places in between.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | September 15, 2008
Robert Kobzi’s students are learning two things simultaneously in their fifth-grade classroom at Arroyo Elementary School: parts of speech, and freedom of speech. Kobzi, who teaches mostly English-learner students at the school in Pomona, leads his class through a unit in constitutional law every year. When he gave a presentation Saturday in UCI’s educational conference on the 1st Amendment, he pinned some samples of his students’ work on the classroom wall — including a poster from three girls who wrote, “It’s important to know our purposes because if we didn’t know them the governor would take advantage of us.” “They got an A,” Kobzi told the group of fellow educators who had come to learn new tactics for working civil liberties into the classroom.
NEWS
October 16, 2007
State Sen. Tom Harman criticized Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger for signing a bill that prohibits lesson plans that negatively portray people based on their gender, sexual orientation or religion. Harman believes the law, which he said should already be covered in state codes, will leave educators open to discrimination lawsuits. ?Since the Education Code already specifically protects against the type of discrimination targeted in [Senate Bill 777] this legislation is unnecessary and will have many adverse consequences on the moral and religious teaching within families,?
NEWS
January 7, 2000
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- Gov. Gray Davis is on the right track in his support of education, but it just isn't enough, say local educators, parents and students. "It's good bits and pieces of what needs to be a comprehensive plan," said Linda Mook, president of the Newport-Mesa Teachers Federation. In his state of the State address Wednesday night, Davis called on students to enter the teaching profession, proposing forgivable college loans, teaching fellowships and cash bonuses as incentives for teachers working in schools that rank in the lowest 50%. "You need qualified teachers in a classroom, and it would be really great if lawmakers woke up and said, 'Lets at least bring California up to the national average and put resources into the schools where they can actually use them,"' Mook said.
LOCAL
December 9, 2009
Submitted by Dan Pittman Costa Mesa-based Experian was the underwriter of the Jump$tart Coalition’s first-ever National Educator Conference, which was held recently in Washington, DC. Created to help educators meet the challenges of teaching personal finance in hard economic times, the forum drew more than 250 classroom teachers from 46 states. The forum was developed in conjunction with the National Education Association (NEA), and featured several Washington dignitaries.
NEWS
October 25, 2002
PUBLIC SAFETY: Scribner wants officials to place a top priority on public safety in areas that they can control, Scribner said. He wants police to focus on violent crime, property and personal crimes and corporate fraud, instead of wasting time on "pot smokers." Something is wrong with a system that punishes a marijuana offender more harshly than a murderer, Scribner said. Officials need to reprioritize to make California safer, he said. "Rapists and murderers belong in jail," Scribner said.
NEWS
November 1, 2002
BACK TO SCHOOL AGAIN 1Orange Coast College will host a daylong conference on adult reentry education from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today in the Student Center and Captain's Table. The conference is meant for community college and university reentry educators and students. There will be a workshop and seminar on relating topics. The campus is at 2701 Fairview Road. Registration is $40, $15 for students and $35 for CARE members. (714) 432-5162. A HIP HALLOWEEN HAPPENING 2The Masquerade Ball for the Arts will be held from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach.
NEWS
By JIM DE BOOM | January 21, 2006
The eighth annual Costa Mesa-Wyndham, Australia Sister-City Education Exchange got off to a wonderful start this week with the arrival of Australian educators Jane Motley and Diana Pongrac. Motley, a primary reading and transition from pre-school to kindergarten specialist, and Pongrac, a primary art specialist and classroom teacher, will spend two weeks in Costa Mesa learning about our education system and sharing information about theirs. In the days since their arrival, Motley and Pongrac have spoken at the Harbor Council PTA and been introduced at the Costa Mesa City Council.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
We Americans are generally a forgiving lot. If you offer up a sincere enough apology, we’re inclined to accept it. This is especially true in Southern California, where mistakes roll off the Hollywood assembly line with the regularity of sequels. So it comes as no surprise that UC Irvine Chancellor Michael Drake’s apology to a mutinous faculty apparently turned back a no-confidence vote from the educators after Drake hired, fired and then rehired Erwin Chemerinsky in a matter of weeks to be the founding dean of UCI’s law school.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | April 26, 2014
On a typical day at Harbor View Elementary School in Corona del Mar, students use iPads to complete spelling exercises, learn math facts and work on reading activities. The iPads were paid for by the Harbor View Dads group, a fundraising organization that spent several years raising enough money to purchase 172 devices for the students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Whittier Elementary is just a short drive up the freeway in Costa Mesa, but in many respects is worlds away from getting the technology the students at Harbor View have at their fingertips, said Patrick DeVusser, a fourth-grade teacher at Whittier.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | April 17, 2014
When asked to name their favorite teacher, many students have a clear choice. However, those teachers are rarely, if ever, recognized. The Costa Mesa Library Foundation set out to change that this year with its first favorite teacher contest. TeWinkle Middle School teachers Denise McKenzie, Rebecca Millam and Misty Smith and College Park kindergarten teacher Cindy Fernald were each nominated by current and former students as contest finalists. More than 200 students, some of whom had parents's help, submitted nominations for teachers in the Costa Mesa area.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 29, 2014
After giving birth to her second child by cesarean section in 2010 at Newport Beach's Hoag Hospital, Kimberlee Streiff felt something wasn't right. She and baby Rhone, now a curly-headed 3-year-old, were fine; it was the process, and her sense that the birth was out of her hands, that had unsettled her. Streiff, whose oldest son was also born by cesarean, had hoped to attempt a vaginal birth after C-section, or VBAC, she said. But when her labor didn't progress fast enough, her doctor quickly ushered her into surgery.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | March 18, 2014
Tom Pollitt, founder of the Newport-Mesa Tea Party, has announced his intent to run for the Orange County Board of Education. The 70-year-old Costa Mesa resident is seeking the District 2 seat, held since 2010 by David Boyd, also a Costa Mesa resident. Boyd is serving out his first term on the five-member board and has applied for reelection in the June primary. Pollitt, a small-business man, said his priorities include making sure that education funds go to the classrooms, not the administration, and improving the county's charter school system.
NEWS
By Joylene Wagner and By Joylene Wagner | March 4, 2014
I first heard the phrase "to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable" in church. A pastor used it to describe the responsibilities of church pastors. I thought it a fitting description of pastoral duties. More recently, I learned the phrase probably originated with early 20th century humorist Finley Peter Dunne in a half-joking description of the role of a journalist. I think the phrase could be applied beneficially in education as well. After all, when dealing with systems and programs as large and unwieldy as education in California, how we frame the conversation can have an effect on experience and outcomes.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | February 22, 2014
In a single week last October, 11 colleges sent representatives to Newport Harbor High School, providing a diverse geographic and academic sampling for students to peruse. The visitors hailed from prestigious four-year schools, such as Pomona College, New York's Barnard College and Middlebury College in Vermont, as well as from local campuses, such as Orange Coast College. By the end of January, nearly 100 colleges had sent recruiters to meet with interested Newport Harbor students.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | February 19, 2014
A fifth candidate - the only Democrat - has entered the race for Assembly District 74. Anila Ali, a native of Pakistan who moved to Irvine in 1996, said she hopes to draw on her background as an immigrant and her roles as a mother and teacher to serve the state. Ali said she moved to the United States because of its promise of equal opportunity and access to education. Now the mother of two, she aims to help improve the educational system, grow the state's economy and ensure a high quality of life for future generations.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 16, 2014
A Newport-Mesa Unified School District educator and Huntington Beach community program were honored Wednesday for their affect on education. Janine Frendo, an instructional aide at TeWinkle Middle School, and the group Huntington Beach Reads One Book, were among four honorees presented with Outstanding Contributions to Education awards during the Orange County Board of Education meeting in Costa Mesa, according to a news release. The awards, which began in the 1980s, were started to acknowledge those who have dedicated their time to support education in Orange County schools.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | December 20, 2013
Every Christmas I take time to remember my parents. They came from vastly different backgrounds: Dad had a hardscrabble upbringing in the dusty Southwest, while Mom was a frail, bookish New York City girl. Yet these opposites forged a partnership that lasted more than 40 years. Despite their differences they were kindred spirits when it came to the essential stuff. And what mattered to them, perhaps more than anything, was education. My parents fervently believed in the power of a good education and they suffused my early years with that commitment.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | December 13, 2013
The Newport-Mesa Unified School District has made the numerous repairs identified by the Orange County Department of Education in September, the board of trustees acknowledged this week. A report from the department outlined 40 problems at five elementary schools in Costa Mesa, including broken sinks, drinking fountains and playground equipment, as well as loose televisions in classrooms. Each year, the Department of Education conducts site visits at Orange County's lower-achieving schools to ensure that there are adequate books and teachers for students and that facilities are in good condition.
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