Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsDrinking Water
IN THE NEWS

Drinking Water

NEWS
October 25, 2004
Alicia Robinson Water will soon be flowing back into the Big Canyon Reservoir, but its new, city-installed lid will leave avid water-viewers disappointed. For about 40 years, the reservoir on Pacific View Drive held drinking water that served most of Newport Beach. The city emptied it in October 2003 to install a floating plastic cover, a measure mandated by the state health department to protect drinking water from animal droppings, bug infestations and other contaminants that can fall or live in the water.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 28, 2004
Alicia Robinson After sitting empty and dry for more than 10 years, the San Joaquin Reservoir could start filling with water as soon as next month. The 49.3-acre reservoir, which can hold nearly a billion gallons, held drinking water for the Metropolitan Water District until late 1993. The district was one of eight joint owners at the time. Soon, the reservoir will store treated wastewater to be used for irrigation by its current owner, the Irvine Ranch Water District.
NEWS
August 25, 2004
Alicia Robinson They are the elected offices people don't usually pay much attention to -- that is, until funny-tasting water comes out of the faucet, or the toilet won't flush. In November, 15 people will seek directors' seats on boards that control how the water tastes and where the waste goes. You might not know who the board members are, but you probably know their work. "If we're doing a good job, we're off the radar screen," said John Withers, who has served on the Irvine Ranch Water District Board for 15 years and is seeking another term in November.
NEWS
December 30, 2003
Jenny Marder The Army Corps of Engineers is letting one of Newport-Mesa's main water suppliers capture an additional 1.6-billion gallons of storm water this winter, enough to serve almost 10,000 Orange County families. This will provide a boost to a depleted groundwater supply that's hurting from increased use and four years of drought. The Orange County Water District will now be able to capture 13,500 acre-feet of water behind the Prado Dam instead of the previous 8,600 feet, increasing storage capacity in the area by 50%. The district will store the water until March 1 and then release it into its groundwater basin.
NEWS
December 5, 2003
June Casagrande If you want the scuttlebutt on how to win top honors at the Southwestern Rendezvous youth sailing competition, you'd do well to talk to the crew of Sea Scout Ship 711. For starters, these 10 young men know that the main definition of "scuttlebutt" isn't gossip or rumor. A scuttlebutt was what sailors used to call a vessel to hold drinking water on a ship. Today, it's the title of just one of the 15 events for which this crew won first place in last week's Rendezvous at Port Hueneme Navy Base.
NEWS
November 19, 2002
June Casagrande A potential cancer-causing chemical found in drinking water supplies earlier this year gave a startling lesson for a groundwater replenishment system planned to take effect in 2007. The chemical 1,4-dioxane got into water that had been through a treatment that officials had believed would filter out all such chemical agents. This treatment process, known as reverse osmosis, is integral to the region's plans for replenishing ground water.
NEWS
November 14, 2002
June Casagrande The Orange County Water District has agreed to compensate the two cities for costs incurred when a potentially cancer-causing solvent was found in local water supplies in January. The district will pay $186,000 to Costa Mesa and $157,000 to Newport Beach to compensate them for having to buy water from other sources in January after the district discovered the potentially carcinogenic 1,4-dioxane. "It was a unique situation," said Ron Wildermuth, a spokesman for the water district.
NEWS
June 29, 2002
The Costa Mesa Human Relations Committee is holding its first volunteer recognition reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday. The event will honor Costa Mesa residents who have given time and effort to improve the city, committee members said. Mayor Linda Dixon and her fellow council members are scheduled to take part. The reception will be held at the Neighborhood Community Center in Lions Park, 1845 Park Ave. Study says water supply is safe The city's water supply is safe, according to a report released this week by the Mesa Consolidated Water District.
NEWS
June 12, 2002
Lolita Harper COSTA MESA -- The city's water supply is safe, according to a report set for release next month. The Mesa Consolidated Water District Report for 2002 will be mailed to customers in July, said General Manager Diana Leach, and will detail the results of various daily tests that are done to ensure safe drinking water. "The public is much more aware of water quality, and we want to make sure our customers know that things are not only OK but we continue to monitor its safety every day," Leach said.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
June Casagrande NEWPORT-MESA -- Wells taken out of service after a potentially cancer-causing chemical was detected are again providing water to Costa Mesa and Newport Beach. Mesa Consolidated Water District, which provides water to Costa Mesa, stopped providing water from its three wells on Jan. 29 after the Orange County Water District announced it had found traces of the industrial solvent known as "1,4-Dioxane" in the county's aquifer. Newport Beach also stopped service from its wells in Fountain Valley in response to the discovery.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|