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NEWS
February 21, 2002
Paul Clinton NEWPORT-MESA -- To help ease the financial burden of last month's discovery of a cancer-causing substance in Newport Beach's water supply, Mayor Tod Ridgeway has asked the county water agency for about $3.9 million. The city's four drinking-water wells have been shut down since Jan. 29, when county water officials announced they found an industrial solvent in the ground-water aquifer. The solvent, known as 1,4-Dioxane, has been placed on a state watch list of substances potentially harmful to human health.
NEWS
July 19, 2000
Alex Coolman FAIRGROUNDS -- It appeared that Lynette Round was brewing up a batch of tea Tuesday at the Orange County Fair. In one jar, she had a few pints of clear water that looked like it came from the tap. In another, Round had something reminiscent of a pot of weak Lipton. The only thing missing was a few cups and saucers. But the spokeswoman for the Mesa Consolidated Water District wasn't throwing a tea party, she was spreading the word about the district's newest plan to bring drinking water to its customers.
LOCAL
By Chris Caesar and Brianna Bailey | March 13, 2008
Business has picked up slightly at Anthony’s Pure Water Systems in Costa Mesa ever since reports of tap water tainted with trace amounts of prescription drugs have made headlines around the country. “A lot of people have called and want to know what the remedy is and how to address it,” said Anthony’s owner Anthony Monkiewicz, who has sold water filtration systems in Costa Mesa for about 15 years. “I’m very careful not to alarm people about their drinking water, but this is something that is slowly and surely not positive and getting worse.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | September 26, 2013
The temperature hovered around 110 degrees. Humidity levels felt like those of a sauna. Looking up, or around, one could see nothing but darkness. Welcome to the underside of the second new cover for Newport Beach's Big Canyon reservoir, which stores up to 195 million gallons of drinking water for distribution in the city. The cover replaces a tarp constructed in 2005 that wore down prematurely. The completed installation of the new one, expected Friday, will clear the way for the reservoir to be filled once again and bring city staff one step closer to putting its cover problem to rest.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | September 18, 2010
IRVINE — The U.S. Navy did not detect toxins beneath the former El Toro Marine Base's runways and progress is steadily being made on a plume of contamination beneath other sections of the former base, residents were told at last week's City Council meeting. The Navy plans to reevaluate its findings every five years, and if traces of trichloroethylene (TCE), a chemical solvent used on the base in the 1970s, are detected in new areas, the Navy will continue to clean it up, said Jim Callian, Navy Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator for El Toro.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
Drinking water provided by Mesa Consolidated Water District in 2006 met all state and federal standards for cleanliness, according to a recent annual report from the district. Mesa Consolidated serves Costa Mesa and parts of Newport Beach. Levels of chemicals and other contaminants in the water were well below requirements, the report said. It also detailed which byproducts remained from disinfecting the water and the levels of unregulated contaminants found during tests. To learn more about the report or get information on Mesa Consolidated Water District's drinking water, call (949)
NEWS
November 19, 2002
June Casagrande A potential cancer-causing chemical found in drinking water supplies earlier this year gave a startling lesson for a groundwater replenishment system planned to take effect in 2007. The chemical 1,4-dioxane got into water that had been through a treatment that officials had believed would filter out all such chemical agents. This treatment process, known as reverse osmosis, is integral to the region's plans for replenishing ground water.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 14, 2007
NEWPORT BEACH — State officials and pediatric dentists voiced support at the Newport Beach City Council meeting Tuesday for putting fluoride in the region’s drinking water, while opponents argued the plan could cause unforeseen health problems. The study session, held before the council’s regular meeting, did not lead to the council taking any action, but provided another forum for an issue that has divided Newport Beach for the last month. About half the speakers Tuesday urged the council to accept the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s decision to fluoridate drinking water, citing health benefits, while others said tampering with the water could do more harm than good.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The Orange County Water District is suing industrial companies throughout the county for allegedly polluting the water supply, including one company in Costa Mesa and several in Santa Ana. By contaminating the groundwater basin with volatile organic chemicals and perchlorate, the companies are “posing a serious and substantial threat to the public health and environment,” the lawsuit reads. The district seeks to fine the companies the money it would cost to investigate claims of contamination and clean up wherever necessary.
NEWS
October 19, 2007
Newport Beach City Council members will decide Tuesday whether to ask for a delay in the upcoming fluoridation of Orange County?s water supply so they can sort out residents? concerns. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which provides 18% of Newport?s drinking water, plans to begin adding fluoride at the Robert B. Diemer Treatment Plant Nov. 19. The water district board agreed in 2003 to add enough fluoride to drinking water to provide dental health benefits, and district officials told the council fluoridation has been done for 60 years in America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2014
If you start to notice a slight taste difference or smell in your drinking water, there's a reason for it. Mesa Water District officials said their system has temporarily converted from a chloramine disinfection process to chlorine disinfection. The chlorine, according to the district, will help maintain the health and safety of the water distribution system, which services Costa Mesa, portions of Newport Beach and some unincorporated county areas. The short-term change, described by officials as routine and standard practice for the industry, began Tuesday.
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NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | September 26, 2013
The temperature hovered around 110 degrees. Humidity levels felt like those of a sauna. Looking up, or around, one could see nothing but darkness. Welcome to the underside of the second new cover for Newport Beach's Big Canyon reservoir, which stores up to 195 million gallons of drinking water for distribution in the city. The cover replaces a tarp constructed in 2005 that wore down prematurely. The completed installation of the new one, expected Friday, will clear the way for the reservoir to be filled once again and bring city staff one step closer to putting its cover problem to rest.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | March 22, 2013
When professional surfer Rob Machado rolled into the Corona del Mar High School gym Friday morning, he brought a message with him. "World Water Day," he said after hopping off a skateboard. "We're here to honor what keeps us alive. " To mark the United Nations-designated day, the surfing superstar spoke at a CdM assembly about the importance of clean water, noting the lack of access to it in many parts of the world. "We're spoiled. We live in Southern California. You can drink tap water here," he said.
SPORTS
By Len Bose | August 30, 2011
While much of the East Coast battened hatches and boarded windows in anticipation of Hurricane Irene, I was busy gathering my storm supplies for the 2011 Balboa Yacht Club & Newport Harbor Yacht Club Long Point Invitational Race Week. As always, I brought along my Excedrin Migraine, Tums Ultra 1000, drinking water and 7UPs for the forecasted rum squalls. This not being my first rodeo, I seem to be better preparing for this event each year. Over the last two years, I have attended both breakfasts at Moonstone and Whites, navigated past the "Tree ring" toss at Moonstone, stayed dry during the beach landing at Whites and been physically able to attend the party on Saturday Night.
NEWS
From KTLA News | April 22, 2011
SANTA ANA — A man convicted of ejaculating twice into a co-worker's drinking water has been sentenced to 180 days in jail and three years probation. Michael Kevin Lallana was convicted Feb. 24 of two misdemeanor counts of battery. He will also be required to register as a sex offender. Lallana worked with the victim, identified only as Tiffany G., at Northwestern Mutual in Newport Beach. Lallana "felt that was as close as he could get" to the 29-year-old executive assistant, said Deputy District Atty.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | September 18, 2010
IRVINE — The U.S. Navy did not detect toxins beneath the former El Toro Marine Base's runways and progress is steadily being made on a plume of contamination beneath other sections of the former base, residents were told at last week's City Council meeting. The Navy plans to reevaluate its findings every five years, and if traces of trichloroethylene (TCE), a chemical solvent used on the base in the 1970s, are detected in new areas, the Navy will continue to clean it up, said Jim Callian, Navy Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator for El Toro.
FEATURES
May 6, 2010
Did you know that this week is National Drinking Water Week? Neither did I until an e-mail from a loyal reader hit my inbox. “Drinking Water Week is an opportunity for North Americans to think about what water means to each of us,” AWWA President Craig Woolard said in a news release. “A safe, reliable water supply is critical to the success of any community. It creates jobs, supports business and investment, and provides for the health and welfare of citizens in ways ranging from disease-prevention to fire suppression.
NEWS
By Garry Brown | November 28, 2009
As we try to understand the water crisis gripping California, we must understand that not all of the proposed solutions to our water crisis are created equal. Some solutions such as conservation are inexpensive, most applications are somewhat costly, and then there is one that is outrageously expensive: ocean desalination. Many people believe that ocean desalination is the ultimate solution to our water problems. I support desalination on a case-by-case basis, in certain locations, and with the right technology.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The Orange County Water District is suing industrial companies throughout the county for allegedly polluting the water supply, including one company in Costa Mesa and several in Santa Ana. By contaminating the groundwater basin with volatile organic chemicals and perchlorate, the companies are “posing a serious and substantial threat to the public health and environment,” the lawsuit reads. The district seeks to fine the companies the money it would cost to investigate claims of contamination and clean up wherever necessary.
LOCAL
By Chris Caesar and Brianna Bailey | March 13, 2008
Business has picked up slightly at Anthony’s Pure Water Systems in Costa Mesa ever since reports of tap water tainted with trace amounts of prescription drugs have made headlines around the country. “A lot of people have called and want to know what the remedy is and how to address it,” said Anthony’s owner Anthony Monkiewicz, who has sold water filtration systems in Costa Mesa for about 15 years. “I’m very careful not to alarm people about their drinking water, but this is something that is slowly and surely not positive and getting worse.
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