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Dredging

NEWS
September 1, 2004
Many Newport residents are just hearing about the Santa Ana River "dredge-and-dump" project. The chatter among those who know is this: Because the City Council agreed to write a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the project has been halted. This couldn't be further from the truth. As the scope of the Santa Ana River dredging project involves federal (the corps), county (Orange County Department of Regional Resources) and city (Newport Beach)
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NEWS
January 20, 2010
Dredging in Upper Newport Bay will resume once a series of bad storms passes over the area, city officials said this week. Next week, workers are expected to begin dredging out an area of the Upper Bay near Jamboree Road, using an excavator on a barge to scoop out sediment from the bottom of the bay. The dredging project is slated for completion at the end of 2010, Councilwoman Leslie Daigle said. “Once the excavation restarts, there is a one-year shot clock to completion,” Daigle said.
NEWS
April 11, 2002
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- When Nancy and Jack Skinner went to the City Council meeting Tuesday to talk about water quality, they didn't expect to see their own names on the agenda. The Skinners, along with Frank and the late Fran Robinson, got a surprise honor when Mayor Tod Ridgeway announced that a fund for dredging the bay would be named after the four legendary local environmentalists. "I can't express what an indispensable resource they have all been in working toward clean water in the Back Bay," Ridgeway said in announcing the decision.
FEATURES
October 30, 2005
The birds and beasts that make the Upper Newport Bay their home caught sight of a powerful ally earlier this month when Sen. Dianne Feinstein stopped by to urge support for much-needed but quite-costly dredging. "Say 'Please, this is vital,'" Feinstein told a group of public officials and environmentalists to say to members of Congress. "It's vital for the people; it's vital for the birds." The Back Bay, as has been true in the past, is in dire need of dredging for the simple reason that it is full of sediment.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
I guess I’m not clear as to what constitutes an emergency. If your boat’s sinking, or you’re bleeding from an artery, that’s an emergency. But emergency dredging? I’ll have to think about that for a second. OK, maybe if one of the big dump barges accidentally dropped its load in the middle of Newport Harbor, for sure that would call for some quick dredging. But let’s not get carried away with the Newport Beach Harbor Commission’s enthusiasm to call for “emergency dredging” of the lower bay. Let’s think this through.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | October 16, 2007
How to get the ever-more-shallow Newport harbor dredged has become an $18-million question for Newport Beach officials. The harbor hasn’t been thoroughly dredged in more than 70 years. With boaters’ complaints of running aground becoming more common and an estimated 900,000 cubic yards of sediment to be removed, the city wants to get a dredging project teed up as soon as possible. Officials hope to start in 2009, but first they need to pay for the work. City leaders will meet later this month with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is responsible for maintenance dredging of the harbor, in the hope of persuading the Corps to pay for some or all of the work.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | May 18, 2009
President Obama’s budget request includes about $1.8 million for Newport Beach to dredge its harbor. Although it is the responsibility of the Army Corps of Engineers to keep the bay dredged in compliance with federal law, the corps hasn’t had any funding to do it since the 1930s, when the harbor was dedicated. As a result, silt buildup has made the harbor shallower to the point where it is not navigable for boats with deep keels. The city recently scored $17 million in stimulus funding to finish dredging the Upper Newport Bay, which has been an ongoing project for the last few years, but this is the first time any money has been earmarked for the harbor.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
Deirdre Newman A group of Newport Shores homeowners want a canal near their homes dredged to get rid of the sediment they say is damaging the water quality and health of the marshlands. But the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which owns the channel, says its first priority is dredging the Santa Ana River. And funding is hard to come by for other projects, project manager Ken Morris said. The corps is dredging 400,000 cubic yards of sediment from the Santa Ana River channel and plans to dispose of it in West Newport Beach.
NEWS
June 18, 2004
Alicia Robinson As city officials continue vigorous lobbying of federal legislators to fund a $24.5-million project to dredge the Back Bay, efforts thus far -- including a February trip Mayor Tod Ridgeway took to Washington, D.C. -- have netted only $500,000 for the work. Ridgeway and Assistant City Manager Dave Kiff said they were surprised and disappointed to learn a House appropriations subcommittee set aside only a fraction of the project's cost in a 2005 appropriations bill now working its way through the House.
NEWS
March 13, 2002
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- Some Upper Newport Bay homeowners whose boats are practically beached at low tide can now get permits to have their dock areas dredged, the California Costal Commission has decided. Since 1999, it has been virtually impossible to get a permit to dredge silt and clay accumulations from near private docks in portions of the Back Bay. This is because contaminants such as metals settle into the silt and become a hazard when stirred up by dredging.
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