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NEWS
By Lauren Williams | February 19, 2013
Orange County's district attorney touted the success of his office's DNA database during a Tuesday speech to members of the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce. Tony Rackauckas told about 30 lunchtime diners gathered at the Five Crowns Restaurant that samples from 78,510 people are included in the local database. Many district attorneys rely on state and federal databases, but Orange County created its own, he said, to help solve crime when traditional means of gathering information fall short.
OCNOW
From KTLA News | January 24, 2013
Computer scientists at UC Irvine have developed an app that stores encrypted segments of DNA information on smartphones, giving way to countless possible medical and social uses, according to KTLA . Developers say the app, called GenoDroid, could be used to produce instant medical diagnoses, paternity tests or even help predict what a couples future children would look like. “It essentially does a paternity test. It allows two people, each with their smartphones, to essentially sit together and run this application and within seconds it will tell them if one is the father of the other,” said Professor Gene Tsudik, who helped develop the app. The scientists say that due to the memory limitation of current smartphones, only relevant segments of a person's DNA can be stored; however, they expect technology to catch up in three to four years to allow the storage of complete genome.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | October 2, 2007
UC Irvine?s Henry Samueli School of Engineering has received a $2.18 million grant to research a method that would cut the time and cost of sequencing DNA, school officials said Monday. DNA sequencing is a months-long and roughly $5-million process, so any convenient way of mapping the human genome could immediately improve healthcare and a patient?s quality of life, UCI lead researcher and professor Kumar Wickramasinghe said. ?We all have various modifications in our genetic code that make us more susceptible to certain diseases like diabetes,?
NEWS
April 23, 2002
Police arrested a Costa Mesa tow truck driver Thursday in connection with the brutal murder of a 50-year-old woman in Midway City more than three years ago, Orange County Sheriff's Department officials said Monday. Jeffrey Alan Smith, 23, left behind a trail of blood at the murder scene that matched his DNA, Capt. Steve Carroll said. "We had probable cause to make the arrest Thursday," he said. Lab analysis over the weekend provided a more conclusive result, Carroll said.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | September 1, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — Two Sage Hill School science classes recently attained a college graduate-level achievement — their research published by an international scientific database. Accelerated biology teacher Tyler Zarubin's students decoded the DNA of two species of — you guessed it — sage plants on campus and documented the plant's genetic sequence for the gene involved in the breakdown of sugar, a particular gene that has never been researched. "I want to teach them like a scientist, not a student," Zarubin said.
NEWS
March 8, 2008
UCI researchers have opened a doorway to making stem cell use possibly 100 times more efficient, university officials said Friday. Researchers discovered a new method to insert DNA into cells, which decreases the chance of cells dying after insertion. In the past, chemicals were used to put DNA in cells, but the new method makes tiny holes in the outer layer of a cell, which allows DNA to enter smoothly. Using what they call growth factor/nucleofection, researchers estimate for every one altered cell with the chemical method, they could create 10 to 100 successfully.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | May 1, 2014
Orange County Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas gave members of the Newport Beach business community a crash course Tuesday morning in the work performed by his office. At the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce's monthly Wake Up! Newport breakfast event, Rackauckas, first elected to the position in 1998, said the district attorney's office deals with more than high-profile murder cases. "There are a lot of things we do in the D.A.'s office that you wouldn't think of," he told the several dozen audience members gathered in the Newport Beach Library's Friends Room.
LOCAL
December 28, 2005
The arraignment for a Costa Mesa man suspected of raping two women was postponed Tuesday. Jose Fernandez Lopez is expected to return to court on Jan. 3, according to the Orange County district attorney's office. Costa Mesa police arrested Lopez, 32, in August on suspicion of attacking two women who lived in a West Baker Street apartment complex, where Lopez also lived. At the time of the arrest, Costa Mesa police said DNA evidence linked Lopez to the alleged crimes. Lopez's alleged victims are a 65-year-old woman who was attacked in May and a 46-year-old woman who was attacked in September 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rhea Mahbubani | January 31, 2013
Light boxes. Electrophoresis gels. Enzymes. DNA images. No, we aren't taking inventory of laboratory equipment. These are components of Paul Vanouse's "Evidence…Works," which will be exhibited at UC Irvine's Claire Trevor School of the Arts starting Thursday. Hosted by the Beall Center for Art + Technology, the artist's "BioArt," as he calls it, will be on display until May 4. A resident of Buffalo, N.Y., Vanouse demonstrated an early interest in artwork that employed interactive machines.
NEWS
By Alicia Lopez, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 20, 2012
The Frog Prince gave up his life for the educational benefit of seventh-grade honor students at Costa Mesa Middle School. Under the direction of science teacher Roy Center, students from three classes studied Mr. Frog's death on Feb. 15 and 16 by examining evidence, including DNA and fingerprints. The investigation was part of an annual a project that Center has been conducting for five years. He arranges witnesses, suspects and the crime scene. He sets up the scene with a chalk outline of the stuffed Frog Prince who's surrounded by blood, fingerprint and shoeprint evidence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | May 1, 2014
Orange County Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas gave members of the Newport Beach business community a crash course Tuesday morning in the work performed by his office. At the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce's monthly Wake Up! Newport breakfast event, Rackauckas, first elected to the position in 1998, said the district attorney's office deals with more than high-profile murder cases. "There are a lot of things we do in the D.A.'s office that you wouldn't think of," he told the several dozen audience members gathered in the Newport Beach Library's Friends Room.
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NEWS
By Lauren Williams | February 19, 2013
Orange County's district attorney touted the success of his office's DNA database during a Tuesday speech to members of the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce. Tony Rackauckas told about 30 lunchtime diners gathered at the Five Crowns Restaurant that samples from 78,510 people are included in the local database. Many district attorneys rely on state and federal databases, but Orange County created its own, he said, to help solve crime when traditional means of gathering information fall short.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rhea Mahbubani | January 31, 2013
Light boxes. Electrophoresis gels. Enzymes. DNA images. No, we aren't taking inventory of laboratory equipment. These are components of Paul Vanouse's "Evidence…Works," which will be exhibited at UC Irvine's Claire Trevor School of the Arts starting Thursday. Hosted by the Beall Center for Art + Technology, the artist's "BioArt," as he calls it, will be on display until May 4. A resident of Buffalo, N.Y., Vanouse demonstrated an early interest in artwork that employed interactive machines.
OCNOW
From KTLA News | January 24, 2013
Computer scientists at UC Irvine have developed an app that stores encrypted segments of DNA information on smartphones, giving way to countless possible medical and social uses, according to KTLA . Developers say the app, called GenoDroid, could be used to produce instant medical diagnoses, paternity tests or even help predict what a couples future children would look like. “It essentially does a paternity test. It allows two people, each with their smartphones, to essentially sit together and run this application and within seconds it will tell them if one is the father of the other,” said Professor Gene Tsudik, who helped develop the app. The scientists say that due to the memory limitation of current smartphones, only relevant segments of a person's DNA can be stored; however, they expect technology to catch up in three to four years to allow the storage of complete genome.
NEWS
By Alicia Lopez, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 20, 2012
The Frog Prince gave up his life for the educational benefit of seventh-grade honor students at Costa Mesa Middle School. Under the direction of science teacher Roy Center, students from three classes studied Mr. Frog's death on Feb. 15 and 16 by examining evidence, including DNA and fingerprints. The investigation was part of an annual a project that Center has been conducting for five years. He arranges witnesses, suspects and the crime scene. He sets up the scene with a chalk outline of the stuffed Frog Prince who's surrounded by blood, fingerprint and shoeprint evidence.
NEWS
By Steve Smith | January 31, 2012
One Newport-Mesa Unified school board member said this about the underperforming schools on Costa Mesa's Westside: "We can't just accept those scores. We have to help those kids improve. We need to do something about it. We need to see all our scores in that 50th percentile. " In response, I wrote: "My prediction: Nothing will happen and instead of building the missing support system and watching the kids hit the ground running next month when they return to school, we'll watch them continue to flounder.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | September 1, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — Two Sage Hill School science classes recently attained a college graduate-level achievement — their research published by an international scientific database. Accelerated biology teacher Tyler Zarubin's students decoded the DNA of two species of — you guessed it — sage plants on campus and documented the plant's genetic sequence for the gene involved in the breakdown of sugar, a particular gene that has never been researched. "I want to teach them like a scientist, not a student," Zarubin said.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | November 9, 2010
A Costa Mesa man and his brother were charged Tuesday with murder in the commission of a kidnapping after police said that DNA evidence linked them to a burned female body found in Irvine. Gabino Valdivia-Guzman, 31, and his brother Zenaido Valdivia-Guzman, 24, of Santa Ana, were arraigned in custody in Orange County Superior Court Tuesday on special circumstances murder charges. If convicted, they face a minimum sentence of life in prison without parole. Gabino Valdivia-Guzman has pleaded not-guilty and is scheduled for a pre-trial hearing next month.
NEWS
By Paul Anderson | January 27, 2009
Newport Beach police are seeking the public’s help catching a 45-year-old man wanted for allegedly stealing more than $1 million in the burglaries of pricey homes. Richard William Abbott is wanted on an arrest warrant for burglary, police said. Investigators fingered him as the thief who broke into a Newport Beach home Oct. 25 after identifying DNA from blood left at the scene, Sgt. Evan Sailor said. “He’s a two-striker,” Sailor said, explaining how investigators were able to match the DNA. “That’s why he’s on the run and is considered armed and dangerous.
LOCAL
April 23, 2008
A peeping Tom who was scared away from a Costa Mesa home Monday night left behind DNA and a footprint, authorities said Tuesday. At about 11:15 p.m. Monday, a woman called Costa Mesa police after she heard a man groan and saw a shadowy figure outside her bathroom window, Sgt. Bryan Glass said. The woman, who lives in the 800 block of Jennifer Lane, a cul-de-sac east of the 73 freeway just off Paularino Avenue, was getting ready to take a shower when she saw the figure, police said.
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