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By Brianna Bailey | March 18, 2010
Some of the country’s top medical researchers arrived in Newport Beach on Thursday to help find a cure for a fatal genetic disease that strikes young boys. The Newport Beach-based nonprofit CureDuchenne is hosting its first Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Summit at the Newport Beach Marriott this week to discuss the latest developments in medical research on the disease. “I’m very humbled, first of all, to have this level of top researchers in the world giving up their weekend to come out here,” said mom and CureDuchenne co-founder Debra Miller.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | September 2, 2006
A study by UC Irvine researchers could prove that stress is even more harmful to the human body than previously thought — specifically to the brain. The researchers, led by Frank LaFerla, discovered a hormonal connection between stress and Alzheimer's disease. The study shows that increased levels of stress increases acceleration of the disease through the brain. UCI researchers Kim Green and Lauren Billings worked to solve the connection between stress and Alzheimer's using a crew of genetically altered mice.
NEWS
November 15, 2003
The Islamic faith does not prohibit embryonic stem cell research or its use, especially for the treatment of major diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and others. However, the problem arises when this type of research is used for cloning, which might end up in devastating repercussions on humanity. IMAM MOUSTAFA AL-QAZWINI Islamic Educational Center of Orange County Costa Mesa "Choose life," Deuteronomy 30:19, seems so simple and directive.
NEWS
June 30, 2008
The state’s stem cell agency have given $1.5 million to UCI researchers Sunday under two separate grants to study Huntington’s disease and an eye disease, school officials said Monday. One will go toward researching stem cells and the other will fund the planning stages of the research for the disease, officials said. UCI professor Leslie Thompson was awarded nearly $1.4 million to develop a treatment for Huntington’s disease. She also received $54,618 to coordinate the disease study.
FEATURES
By TONY DODERO | May 2, 2007
Last week, my boss asked me to tag along with him for lunch at our favorite spot, the Yardhouse. He was planning to meet with Debra Miller, a Newport Beach woman who had started the organization CureDuchenne Muscular Dystrophy, www.cureduchenne.org , to discuss news coverage of her group and its events. Not one to turn down a free lunch, I agreed. I'm sure glad I did. Miller told us her story about how she founded the organization, and it was both heartbreaking and inspirational.
NEWS
September 1, 2001
Young Chang The title of the Alzheimer's Assn. of Orange County's next conference -- Spiritual Care of Patients and Families Affected by Alzheimer's Disease: A Conference for Clergy -- might raise some eyebrows. Why the clergy? "We try to encourage leaders in our community to understand. The family stops going to church. They lose their connection with their religion," said Linda Scheck, executive director of the organization. To bring caregivers and people with Alzheimer's back to their faith -- and to help keep them from straying in the first place -- the Interfaith Outreach Committee of the Alzheimer's Assn.
FEATURES
By Shannon Urtnowski | July 29, 2006
At the UC Irvine Brain Imaging Center, treatments and diagnoses of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease and other brain-related illnesses are being discovered through the center's state-of-the-art imaging technology. The center is a world-class imaging facility, and one of its most recent technological advances has pushed it to a new height. It now houses a High Resolution Research Tomograph, a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner with 10 times the resolution of the center's previous scanner.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | August 28, 2008
It was 41 months ago today that Augie Nieto was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. His motor functions have been compromised and his family shaken, and his life is often an attempt at finding balance. Nieto said half of those diagnosed with ALS don’t survive past 18 months. But Nieto, 50, has fought through those months and worked to raise awareness and money to support research about the disease. For Nieto, it is his quest — and that of his wife, Lynne — to champion the cause for the rest of his life, which he intends to have last for a long time.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | October 22, 2009
The scientific key to diagnosing and monitoring Alzheimer’s disease could be in the eyes, UC Irvine researchers say. UCI neuroscientists have discovered that the retinas of laboratory mice, whose genes have been altered so they develop Alzheimer’s disease, experience changes similar to those in the brains of humans who have the disease. In both the retinas and brains, there is an accumulation of amyloid plaque lesions, a hallmark of the disease in brain imaging tests.
NEWS
By B.W. Cook | March 16, 2011
One American develops Alzheimer's disease every 70 seconds, statistics report. According to Linda Scheck, who is with UC Irvine's Mind Institute, the Baby Boomer generation is entering the high-risk age group for being diagnosed with the disease with as many as 10,000 turning 65 every day. Medical science is concerned that the possible onslaught of Alzheimer's victims could become a national crisis in decades to come. In Orange County recently, the UCI Mind Institute, which focuses on memory impairment and neurological disorders, held a fundraiser called Saving Memories with Style.
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By Emily Foxhall | April 9, 2014
Third of three parts. In Part 2 on Wednesday, Orange Coast College student Jon Ludlow decided to stop following his medication schedule, skipping some doses. His behavior became erratic when he stopped taking the prescriptions altogether. He hailed a cab but failed to pay the fare. His parents, Melissa and Dave, started searching for him. Melissa Ludlow felt desperate, especially now that it seemed her son Jon had broken the law by running from a taxi cab without paying the fare.
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By Jim Carnett | March 31, 2014
April is national Parkinson's Awareness Month. I know a bit about Parkinson's disease; we've lived together for 17 years. My father had it for nine years. I received my own diagnosis eight years ago, just before he died. I have an uncle who's exhibiting early symptoms. Parkinson's is a degenerative brain disorder with no known cure. It causes nerve cells to die or become impaired, and patients exhibit such symptoms as tremors or shaking, slowness of movement, rigidity or stiffness, loss of facial mobility, and balance difficulties.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | March 31, 2014
Brian Hirsty, executive chef for the Bluewater Grill, died March 10 following a recent diagnosis of a rare bone marrow disease. He was 47. Hirsty grew up in Southern California. He would often awake before the sun rose, eager to spend time with local fishermen arriving with the day's catch, according to an online restaurant memorial tribute. He would use the fish to practice recipes from the "Joy of Cooking" cookbook, the tribute continued, creating dishes praised by his earliest fan: his brother.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | December 27, 2013
As aid workers from around the world descended on the Philippines to help the people hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan last month, Springer Browne headed toward the devastation for a different reason: the animals. The 31-year-old Newport Beach native made the trip as a volunteer for World Vets, a sort of veterinary equivalent of the humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders, which provides urgent medical care worldwide. World Vets sends veterinarians to work with animals around the world through various projects based on an area's needs.
NEWS
By Rhea Mahbubani | December 12, 2013
Ariel Vapor was disheartened when he received the news, but not particularly surprised. He was HIV-positive. Seated at the UCI Medical Center, with his skin pockmarked by MRSA [methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus] infections, he knew his "promiscuous" lifestyle was to blame. The Costa Mesa resident, who identifies as gay, recalled thinking, "Thank God it's 2006 and not 1986 or 1996. " Having improved significantly over the past two decades, HIV/AIDS medications are now saving lives.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | November 20, 2013
How do I know the color blue to you is the color blue to me? I suppose I don't. But I know that such questions lose their allure by the time one turns 20 or sobers up. But long after doing both, I've come across another question worthy of burrito-fueled midnight philosophy sessions: How do I know the text you see on a page is the same as the text I see on a page? True, to most people, the idea would seem to be born of adolescence or inebriation or both. But for a copy editor, it's a valid question.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
The Mary & Dick Allen Diabetes Center at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach will sponsor a series of free community events throughout November, which is National Diabetes Month, to help educate people about the disease. The events include a lecture, grocery store walk-through and Thanksgiving cooking demonstration, according to a news release. Program Director Dr. Daniel Nadeau will speak about prevention of the disease and the importance of nutrition during an event scheduled for 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the center, 520 Superior Ave. An open house with refreshments will occur during the first and final half-hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
By B.W. Cook | September 5, 2013
It is arguably the grandest party of the summer on the Orange Coast. Oceana's Sea Change event unfolded Aug. 18 at the spectacular Mediterranean estate of Karen and Bruce Cahill , attracting a chic crowd of some 500 residents dedicated to ocean conservation. The al fresco evening welcomed entertainer Sheryl Crow performing for her enthusiastic audience. Guests felt like they were being entertained up close and personal in their home by a superstar. The celebrity contingent was a tour de force element of the summer party.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | August 12, 2013
I sometimes need to be reminded to be grateful for things I take for granted. Like walking. I have a good friend, several years older than I, who's battling an advanced stage of Parkinson's disease. An avid walker for many years, he daily employed that exercise in an attempt to stanch Parkinson's creeping advance. But over the past six months, he has almost completely lost his ability to walk. His stiff legs freeze. When that occurs, he's virtually incapable of taking a step.
NEWS
By Rhea Mahbubani | April 6, 2013
Bill Bisch was in the midst of throwing a football during a family Thanksgiving game when his legs gave out and he fell face down. The 57-year-old San Juan Capistrano resident was quickly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). "MS changed my life dramatically," he said. "Who plans on retiring at 39?" For the second year in a row, Bisch was the top fundraiser at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Walk MS event, hosted Saturday at UC Irvine. Along with his wife and sons, and members of Team Momentum, he contributed more than $30,000 to the cause.
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