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Decoration Day

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NEWS
May 29, 2003
Some scattered shots pulled from my clipping file while I try to decide if the new Patriot's Act requires me to report my neighbor down the street who isn't flying the American flag: I missed an easy shot at a column with the coming and going of Memorial Day, but one post-holiday comment, culled from memory, might be allowed. I read several articles exploring the origin of this holiday that noted it was once -- in some antediluvian period -- known as Decoration Day. As a card-carrying antediluvian, I can attest to that.
NEWS
By JOSEPH N. BELL | May 25, 2006
When I was growing up in northern Indiana, we called the holiday coming up next Monday "Decoration Day." It was first celebrated in the village of Waterloo, N.Y. in 1865 and then made official by order of the first commander of the Grand Army of the Republic on May 30, 1868. This holiday was created very specifically for honoring the patriotic dead of the American Civil War by decorating their graves. In Decatur, Ind., in the early 1930s, I helped celebrate Decoration Day for precisely the same purpose it had been created.
NEWS
Joseph N. Bell | June 4, 2010
Editor's note: Due to an editing error, The Bell Curve failed to appear in Thursday's Daily Pilot. It appears in full below. Memorial Day — we called it Decoration Day when I was growing up in Indiana — has come and gone, and seemed more full of urgent memories and intensity this year than ever before. Maybe that's because I feel closer to the Civil War as I grow older. There is an increasing awareness as I distance myself from it that I was only two generations away from the violent remnants of slavery in this country, a sobering thought whenever I allow it in. My grandfather, Robert Patterson, was a colonel in Gen. William Rosecrans' Army of the Cumberland.
NEWS
June 1, 2004
Marisa O'Neil While thousands of people got an early start on their beach day Monday, hundreds more gathered at Harbor Lawn Memorial Park to celebrate the holiday's true meaning. This year marked the park's 50th Memorial Day service, hosted by the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3536. Boy Scouts, veterans, families and community members came to the service on a picture-perfect day to remember those who died for their country. "I ask you to enjoy the beauty of the day," Councilman Allan Mansoor told the crowd.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | May 25, 2009
Rows of white chairs filled with military veterans and their families and friends looked out on the green grass of the Pacific View Memorial Park in Corona del Mar on Monday morning in observance of Memorial Day. Keynote speaker and veteran Robert Carolan told the assembled crowd stories of an American man and woman who died in combat in last few years, getting choked up as he called them his heroes. “Let us remember these fallen comrades not just now but long after we leave here today,” he said.
NEWS
May 30, 2010
A mericans on Monday will honor their war dead. An annual springtime ritual will play out in Costa Mesa, Newport Beach and Corona del Mar, as well as in towns, hamlets and cities nationwide. Veterans, civic leaders and politicians will gather at local cemeteries, or outside veterans' halls in their respective communities, to remember fallen soldiers, sailors and airmen. The nation gets the day off on Memorial Day, the climax of a three-day weekend kicking off the summer vacation season.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | May 28, 2007
Andrew Sturgell remembers the worry he went through every day while his father served a tour of duty in Iraq between 2004 and 2005. Clad in his dad's dress uniform, Andrew, 13, of Brea, proudly marched out before the Memorial Day crowd gathered Monday at the 48th Pacific View Memorial Park Annual Service in Corona del Mar to honor the soldiers who have died in battle. Andrew, his sister Emily Sturgell, 15, and the rest of Celebration USA expressed their gratitude in several military-inspired numbers for the groups of veterans and their families waving flags in the late-morning air. Celebration USA, a traveling patriotic-performance group led by Villa Park resident Paula Burton, had children in attendance from as far off as Temecula, Riverside and Santa Clarita.
NEWS
June 8, 2004
ROBERT GARDNER When I was growing up in Balboa, most of our residents were veterans of World War I. Dick Whitson, Frank Finster, Theo Robbins, Clayton Thompson, Irvin George Gordon, Harry Williamson, Lancey Sherman, Lloyd Clair, Gene Fenlon, Harry Estes and, most important of all for this discussion, Gus Tamplis all saw military service. You would think with so many vets that Memorial Day would have been a day of recollection or reflection, a moment to ponder the futility of war, to think of lost comrades.
FEATURES
By ROBERT GARDNER | May 26, 2006
When I was growing up in Balboa, most of our residents were veterans of World War I. Dick Whitson, Frank Finster, Theo Robbins, Clayton Thompson, Irvin George Gordon, Harry Williamson, Lancey Sherman, Lloyd Clair, Gene Fenlon, Harry Estes and, most important of all for this discussion, Gus Tamplis all saw military service. You would think with so many vets that Memorial Day would have been a day of recollection or reflection, a moment to ponder the futility of war, to think of lost comrades.
NEWS
By Dave Brooks | May 30, 2006
An ever-present sun shined down on a somber Memorial Day commemoration yesterday at the Pacific View Memorial Park. Hundreds of visitors gathered to pay tribute to those who died serving in the U.S. military and to honor troops fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. While anti-war protesters held demonstrations at some Memorial Day events across the country, Monday's Newport Beach service was free of any demonstrators. "Politics should end at the entrance of this serene resting place," Brigadier General Ronald B. Flynn told the audience, many of whom came dressed in red, white and blue and watched the ceremony at the bottom of a small hill.
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | May 12, 2012
Now that Mom's been served breakfast in bed or treated to a day at the spa, why not look ahead to the next occasion and plan for something more meaningful to do than flipping burgers on a backyard grill this coming Memorial Day weekend? After all, the original intent of the holiday tends to get a bit lost these days, what with all the department store sales and the enticing whiff of summer on the way. Sometimes, a little perspective is in order. Memorial Day was declared a national holiday in 1971, but it arose out of an array of observances of our nation's war dead that took place in various places around the country since the Civil War. Throughout much of that history, it was more commonly referred to as Decoration Day, reflecting the intention that the occasion be used to decorate veterans' grave sites as a show of gratitude and respect.
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NEWS
Joseph N. Bell | June 4, 2010
Editor's note: Due to an editing error, The Bell Curve failed to appear in Thursday's Daily Pilot. It appears in full below. Memorial Day — we called it Decoration Day when I was growing up in Indiana — has come and gone, and seemed more full of urgent memories and intensity this year than ever before. Maybe that's because I feel closer to the Civil War as I grow older. There is an increasing awareness as I distance myself from it that I was only two generations away from the violent remnants of slavery in this country, a sobering thought whenever I allow it in. My grandfather, Robert Patterson, was a colonel in Gen. William Rosecrans' Army of the Cumberland.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | May 31, 2010
It's not about barbecues and golfing and days off from work: Memorial Day is for the fallen soldiers and those who died at the expense of America's freedom. That was the message delivered Monday by U.S. Marine Sgt. Major Michael Templeton, who lost friends in his three tours of Iraq. In a speech at Pacific View Memorial Park in Corona del Mar, Templeton turned the holiday on its head, using his time at the lectern to express some of his dislikes and even admitting that at first he didn't even want to speak to the crowd of Newport Beach veterans.
NEWS
May 30, 2010
A mericans on Monday will honor their war dead. An annual springtime ritual will play out in Costa Mesa, Newport Beach and Corona del Mar, as well as in towns, hamlets and cities nationwide. Veterans, civic leaders and politicians will gather at local cemeteries, or outside veterans' halls in their respective communities, to remember fallen soldiers, sailors and airmen. The nation gets the day off on Memorial Day, the climax of a three-day weekend kicking off the summer vacation season.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | May 25, 2009
Rows of white chairs filled with military veterans and their families and friends looked out on the green grass of the Pacific View Memorial Park in Corona del Mar on Monday morning in observance of Memorial Day. Keynote speaker and veteran Robert Carolan told the assembled crowd stories of an American man and woman who died in combat in last few years, getting choked up as he called them his heroes. “Let us remember these fallen comrades not just now but long after we leave here today,” he said.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | May 29, 2007
Andrew Sturgell remembers the worry he went through every day while his father served a tour of duty in Iraq between 2004 and 2005. Clad in his dad's dress uniform, Andrew, 13, of Brea, proudly marched out before the Memorial Day crowd gathered Monday at the 48th Pacific View Memorial Park Annual Service in Corona del Mar to honor the soldiers who have died in battle. Andrew, his sister Emily Sturgell, 15, and the rest of Celebration USA expressed their gratitude in several military-inspired numbers for the groups of veterans and their families waving flags in the late-morning air. Celebration USA, a traveling patriotic-performance group led by Villa Park resident Paula Burton, had children in attendance from as far off as Temecula, Riverside and Santa Clarita.
NEWS
By Dave Brooks | May 30, 2006
An ever-present sun shined down on a somber Memorial Day commemoration yesterday at the Pacific View Memorial Park. Hundreds of visitors gathered to pay tribute to those who died serving in the U.S. military and to honor troops fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. While anti-war protesters held demonstrations at some Memorial Day events across the country, Monday's Newport Beach service was free of any demonstrators. "Politics should end at the entrance of this serene resting place," Brigadier General Ronald B. Flynn told the audience, many of whom came dressed in red, white and blue and watched the ceremony at the bottom of a small hill.
FEATURES
By ROBERT GARDNER | May 26, 2006
When I was growing up in Balboa, most of our residents were veterans of World War I. Dick Whitson, Frank Finster, Theo Robbins, Clayton Thompson, Irvin George Gordon, Harry Williamson, Lancey Sherman, Lloyd Clair, Gene Fenlon, Harry Estes and, most important of all for this discussion, Gus Tamplis all saw military service. You would think with so many vets that Memorial Day would have been a day of recollection or reflection, a moment to ponder the futility of war, to think of lost comrades.
NEWS
By JOSEPH N. BELL | May 25, 2006
When I was growing up in northern Indiana, we called the holiday coming up next Monday "Decoration Day." It was first celebrated in the village of Waterloo, N.Y. in 1865 and then made official by order of the first commander of the Grand Army of the Republic on May 30, 1868. This holiday was created very specifically for honoring the patriotic dead of the American Civil War by decorating their graves. In Decatur, Ind., in the early 1930s, I helped celebrate Decoration Day for precisely the same purpose it had been created.
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