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Decomposed Granite

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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | September 11, 2013
A Fairview Park activist group is offering a $500 reward for information leading to the identity of those responsible for laying down material that encroached upon a federally protected habitat. Friends of Fairview Nature Park is seeking the people or entities responsible for the recently un-permitted placement of decomposed granite (DG) onto two trails within the 208-acre park's southeastern edge, near Jim Scott Stadium and Parsons Field. A portion of the DG, according to a city-commissioned report, affected one of Fairview Park's vernal pools, a wetland-like habitat that contains the San Diego fairy shrimp - an endangered species - and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 13, 2013
Work to remove a trail made of decomposed granite at Fairview Park started Friday, according to published reports. A Huntington Beach environmental consulting firm was hired to remove the unpermitted trail work, which possibly harmed the habitat of an endangered species, officials said. For about $14,000, Endemic Environmental Services will remove by hand the two decomposed granite trails that encroached on a vernal pool, potentially affecting the San Diego fairy shrimp's habitat.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A Huntington Beach environmental consulting firm will remove unpermitted trail work in Fairview Park that harmed the habitat of an endangered species, officials said. For about $14,000, Endemic Environmental Services will remove by hand the two decomposed granite trails that encroached on a vernal pool, potentially affecting the San Diego fairy shrimp's habitat. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after investigating the matter, directed the city in November to remove the trails as an "emergency action.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
According to a recent Daily Pilot article, "Feds order removal of granite paths at Fairview," Nov. 27, Costa Mesa is required to remove the decomposed granite path from Fairview Park, as directed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The removal is going to be expensive. The person, or persons, who made the path are not known, and an environmental group is offering $500 for the identity of the culprit, or culprits. I would urge the City Council to also post a $500 prize leading to the identification of the people who made the path.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
Re. "Commentary: Too many cops are leaving the CMPD" (March 7): Some people have speculated that the turnover in the Costa Mesa Police Department is political. Wow, politics in municipal employment, how surprising. What is more surprising is the attempt by some to blame the mayor's office for this. The mayor? The elected mayor? Surely the CMPD is not saying it rejects the leadership of the elected officials of this city. The same elected officials who represent the people of this city?
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 27, 2013
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has directed the city of Costa Mesa to remove two man-made trails threatening a tiny endangered species that breeds in the seasonal ponds at Fairview Park. Both trails, located along the 208-acre park's southeastern edge next to Parsons Field and Estancia High School, were topped in the summer with decomposed granite, which the federal agency fears will harm the San Diego fairy shrimp this winter. The work was done without the city's permission, possibly by volunteers unaware of the area's biological significance.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 24, 2013
Although crews this week have removed truckloads of unapproved sediment placed on two trails in Fairview Park in Costa Mesa, the job isn't quite complete. City officials had hoped to have the project done by now, but after some delays, they now expect to finish by the end of this week. The work remains within the nearly $14,000 budget, Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz said Tuesday. The two trails - topped sometime this summer with decomposed granite without Costa Mesa City Hall's permission - are in the 208-acre park's southeastern quadrant.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | January 31, 2014
Costa Mesa Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger announced Friday that he plans to meet with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents and tell them what he knows about decomposed granite trails that damaged sensitive habitat when they mysteriously appeared in Fairview Park. "I have asked the city attorney's office to contact U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to arrange for me to talk to its agents about what I know about this incident," Mensinger said in a statement released Friday. This summer, two trails within the 208-acre park were topped with decomposed granite without city permission.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | August 23, 2013
The mysterious appearance of an unpermitted trail in Fairview Park has drawn federal attention. Earlier this week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contacted Costa Mesa officials about the potential loss of federally protected vernal pools within the 208-acre park, according to an email Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz sent to the City Council and city officials. The FWS has "requested the city work with them in the identification, delineation and restoration/mitigation of any of the federally protected vernal pools at Fairview Park that may have been compromised by park users," Munoz wrote.
FEATURES
By Ron Vanderhoff | October 30, 2009
It’s a few minutes before 7 a.m., the neighbors are asleep, and I’m staring at six cubic yards of decomposed granite that was just dumped on my driveway. With my wheelbarrow and shovel, I’ve calculated that it will be 71 trips from the front driveway to the back yard, where I plan to spread this pile of rock. If all goes as proposed, that’s where I will install a garden dedicated to California’s native plants. I killed the lawn there about two months ago. A couple of weeks ago I mowed the dead, brown thatch as low as I could, raked it vigorously with a steel rake and mowed it again, then repeated the rake-mow process a third time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 10, 2014
Re. "Commentary: Too many cops are leaving the CMPD" (March 7): Some people have speculated that the turnover in the Costa Mesa Police Department is political. Wow, politics in municipal employment, how surprising. What is more surprising is the attempt by some to blame the mayor's office for this. The mayor? The elected mayor? Surely the CMPD is not saying it rejects the leadership of the elected officials of this city. The same elected officials who represent the people of this city?
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | January 31, 2014
Costa Mesa Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger announced Friday that he plans to meet with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents and tell them what he knows about decomposed granite trails that damaged sensitive habitat when they mysteriously appeared in Fairview Park. "I have asked the city attorney's office to contact U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to arrange for me to talk to its agents about what I know about this incident," Mensinger said in a statement released Friday. This summer, two trails within the 208-acre park were topped with decomposed granite without city permission.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 24, 2013
Although crews this week have removed truckloads of unapproved sediment placed on two trails in Fairview Park in Costa Mesa, the job isn't quite complete. City officials had hoped to have the project done by now, but after some delays, they now expect to finish by the end of this week. The work remains within the nearly $14,000 budget, Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz said Tuesday. The two trails - topped sometime this summer with decomposed granite without Costa Mesa City Hall's permission - are in the 208-acre park's southeastern quadrant.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 13, 2013
Work to remove a trail made of decomposed granite at Fairview Park started Friday, according to published reports. A Huntington Beach environmental consulting firm was hired to remove the unpermitted trail work, which possibly harmed the habitat of an endangered species, officials said. For about $14,000, Endemic Environmental Services will remove by hand the two decomposed granite trails that encroached on a vernal pool, potentially affecting the San Diego fairy shrimp's habitat.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A Huntington Beach environmental consulting firm will remove unpermitted trail work in Fairview Park that harmed the habitat of an endangered species, officials said. For about $14,000, Endemic Environmental Services will remove by hand the two decomposed granite trails that encroached on a vernal pool, potentially affecting the San Diego fairy shrimp's habitat. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after investigating the matter, directed the city in November to remove the trails as an "emergency action.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
According to a recent Daily Pilot article, "Feds order removal of granite paths at Fairview," Nov. 27, Costa Mesa is required to remove the decomposed granite path from Fairview Park, as directed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The removal is going to be expensive. The person, or persons, who made the path are not known, and an environmental group is offering $500 for the identity of the culprit, or culprits. I would urge the City Council to also post a $500 prize leading to the identification of the people who made the path.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 27, 2013
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has directed the city of Costa Mesa to remove two man-made trails threatening a tiny endangered species that breeds in the seasonal ponds at Fairview Park. Both trails, located along the 208-acre park's southeastern edge next to Parsons Field and Estancia High School, were topped in the summer with decomposed granite, which the federal agency fears will harm the San Diego fairy shrimp this winter. The work was done without the city's permission, possibly by volunteers unaware of the area's biological significance.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | September 11, 2013
A Fairview Park activist group is offering a $500 reward for information leading to the identity of those responsible for laying down material that encroached upon a federally protected habitat. Friends of Fairview Nature Park is seeking the people or entities responsible for the recently un-permitted placement of decomposed granite (DG) onto two trails within the 208-acre park's southeastern edge, near Jim Scott Stadium and Parsons Field. A portion of the DG, according to a city-commissioned report, affected one of Fairview Park's vernal pools, a wetland-like habitat that contains the San Diego fairy shrimp - an endangered species - and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | September 4, 2013
An ecologically sensitive vernal pool at Fairview Park was "modified" by some decomposed granite placed over a portion of it, according to a city-commissioned environmental study. LSA Associates' six-page report, dated Tuesday, gave recommendations for repairing the damage to Vernal Pool 6, a small portion of which was affected by the decomposed granite (DG) placed onto two paths that converge in Fairview Park's southeastern edge and go over a small segment of the pool. The pool, which is between 0.02 and 0.04 acres, is one of several temporary wetlands within Fairview Park.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | August 23, 2013
The mysterious appearance of an unpermitted trail in Fairview Park has drawn federal attention. Earlier this week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contacted Costa Mesa officials about the potential loss of federally protected vernal pools within the 208-acre park, according to an email Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz sent to the City Council and city officials. The FWS has "requested the city work with them in the identification, delineation and restoration/mitigation of any of the federally protected vernal pools at Fairview Park that may have been compromised by park users," Munoz wrote.
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