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NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | September 5, 2006
The dredging equipment in the Upper Newport Bay fell idle in late July, but work will resume after the expected arrival today of a new dredge that can move dirt much faster. The dredging, an 18-month project that began in February, is part of a $39-million environmental restoration of the Back Bay. The bay is one of the largest wetlands in Southern California and is home to rare birds and other animals. Sediment must be removed from the shallow bay about every 20 years to keep it from becoming a meadow.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
June Casagrande Federal dredging now taking place near the mouth of the harbor will clear a path for boaters, including in areas that haven't been dredged for 70 or 80 years. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' project will cost more than $1 million, funded entirely by the federal government. It will move more than 44,000 cubic yards of sediment out of the area designated as federal navigational waterways, removing shoals of sediment buildup that have become an increasing problem for boaters.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | February 15, 2013
A major dredging project in Newport Harbor wrapped up this week, leaving the lower bay cleaner and more navigable than it's been in decades, officials said. Now, the harbor is 10 to 16 feet deep in most spots. "First of all, I think it means we've greatly improved safety and navigation," Newport Beach Mayor Keith Curry said when asked about the roughly $7-million undertaking's close. "It substantially reduced the risk of [boats] running aground in low tide, and made the harbor cleaner and safer, because we were able to remove a lot of toxic material.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 2, 2007
With the $39-million Upper Newport Bay dredging project about one-third finished, officials are realizing they may have to scramble for more funding to get the work done. Newport Beach and Orange County leaders asked the federal government for $14 million in the 2008 fiscal year, which would be enough to finish the project. But in July, the Senate only put $4 million for the Back Bay in a water appropriations bill ? four times what the House put in its bill, and when the two are reconciled, the Senate amount will be the upper limit.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 22, 2013
Crews dredging sediment from the Santa Ana River Marsh in Newport Beach will be working in overdrive to wrap up a project that was scheduled to be complete a few weeks ago. The Army Corps of Engineers, which is pumping "good quality" sediment just offshore and trucking the rest to upland sites, expects to finish by March 31. Previously, the temporary pipeline running across the sand and into the water near 60th Street was scheduled to...
NEWS
March 1, 2008
In reading Marilyn Beck’s excellent letter regarding the proposed Aerie development in Corona del Mar, I noticed she had inadvertently stated that 25,240 cubic feet of bluff material removal will be required for the project. That number is 25,240 cubic yards (or 681,480 cubic feet). The massiveness of this project and the destruction of the coastal bluff is made possible only with a number of concessions by the city of Newport Beach and the Planning Commission, which recently approved this project with a 6-1 vote.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
Alicia Robinson Sand to be dredged from the Santa Ana River won't be spread on the beach here as many residents feared, officials said Tuesday. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers planned to replenish beaches between 32nd and 56th streets with sand from 400,000 cubic yards of river sediment, which city officials thought would be a win-win project that would overhaul the river while protecting the city's beaches from erosion. But West Newport residents loudly protested, saying the river sand could contain trash and bacteria that would foul the beach.
NEWS
January 7, 2005
Alicia Robinson Sand was expected to begin flowing off the coast in West Newport today as part of a major Santa Ana River dredging project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is leading the $5-million project, which will dredge about 400,000 cubic yards of sediment from the river as part of a larger flood-control effort. Work began in November, and about 2,200 cubic yards of silt already have been dredged and pumped onto an island for endangered birds just east of the river and north of Coast Highway.
FEATURES
By Alicia Robinson | June 18, 2007
NEWPORT BEACH — The Upper Newport Bay is trying to disappear, and Andrew Hunt is trying to stop it. He's the project engineer for DD-M Crane and Rigging, the construction contractor on the upper bay dredging project, and his job is to save a natural resource — a 1,000-acre estuary — by stopping a natural process. "A salt marsh by its nature destroys itself. It's constantly changing," Hunt said on a recent tour of the dredging project. "In 20 years' time, this all becomes meadows.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall and By Emily Foxhall | April 15, 2014
While some Newport Beach residents eagerly await the opening of Marina Park in two years, others already have cause for celebration. They've been promised some of the location's sand. To make way for the 23-slip marina planned for the new Balboa Peninsula park, crews will soon dredge more than 40,000 cubic yards of material from the harbor and redistribute it throughout the city's shoreline. It's a perfect source for reusable beach material — a highly sought-after commodity for beach dwellers who experience, quite literally, life's shifting sands.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall and By Emily Foxhall | April 15, 2014
While some Newport Beach residents eagerly await the opening of Marina Park in two years, others already have cause for celebration. They've been promised some of the location's sand. To make way for the 23-slip marina planned for the new Balboa Peninsula park, crews will soon dredge more than 40,000 cubic yards of material from the harbor and redistribute it throughout the city's shoreline. It's a perfect source for reusable beach material — a highly sought-after commodity for beach dwellers who experience, quite literally, life's shifting sands.
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NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 22, 2013
Crews dredging sediment from the Santa Ana River Marsh in Newport Beach will be working in overdrive to wrap up a project that was scheduled to be complete a few weeks ago. The Army Corps of Engineers, which is pumping "good quality" sediment just offshore and trucking the rest to upland sites, expects to finish by March 31. Previously, the temporary pipeline running across the sand and into the water near 60th Street was scheduled to...
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | February 15, 2013
A major dredging project in Newport Harbor wrapped up this week, leaving the lower bay cleaner and more navigable than it's been in decades, officials said. Now, the harbor is 10 to 16 feet deep in most spots. "First of all, I think it means we've greatly improved safety and navigation," Newport Beach Mayor Keith Curry said when asked about the roughly $7-million undertaking's close. "It substantially reduced the risk of [boats] running aground in low tide, and made the harbor cleaner and safer, because we were able to remove a lot of toxic material.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | January 12, 2011
The California Coastal Commission on Wednesday approved Newport Beach's Rhine Channel restoration project. The commissioners gave the go-ahead to dredge 150,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the waterway near Cannery Village and dump it at the Port of Long Beach . The approval is the latest step in the process to clean up waste from shipyards, canneries, boat-building and metal plating facilities that operated there for...
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | November 4, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — In the wake of the midterm elections, when most of the country has been talking about bipartisan divisions in the House and Senate, a Republican congressman and Democratic senator are coming together. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-California) and Rep. Ed Royce (R-California) will be in Newport Beach Saturday to celebrate the completion of the Upper Newport Bay Dredging, a $47-million public works project that required cooperation among politicians of different levels and colors.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | October 7, 2010
It took four years, $17 million and some pestering of the federal government by Newport Beach officials, but the dredging of Upper Newport Bay is done. In his monthly update to the Harbor Commission last month, Harbor Resources Manager Chris Miller told the group that more than 1.8 million cubic yards of sediment had been moved and the contractor would be demobilized by Oct. 27. The Back Bay project, which started in 2006, intended to improve the natural habitat of some endangered birds and reduce the sediment flow into the harbor.
NEWS
March 1, 2008
In reading Marilyn Beck’s excellent letter regarding the proposed Aerie development in Corona del Mar, I noticed she had inadvertently stated that 25,240 cubic feet of bluff material removal will be required for the project. That number is 25,240 cubic yards (or 681,480 cubic feet). The massiveness of this project and the destruction of the coastal bluff is made possible only with a number of concessions by the city of Newport Beach and the Planning Commission, which recently approved this project with a 6-1 vote.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 2, 2007
With the $39-million Upper Newport Bay dredging project about one-third finished, officials are realizing they may have to scramble for more funding to get the work done. Newport Beach and Orange County leaders asked the federal government for $14 million in the 2008 fiscal year, which would be enough to finish the project. But in July, the Senate only put $4 million for the Back Bay in a water appropriations bill ? four times what the House put in its bill, and when the two are reconciled, the Senate amount will be the upper limit.
FEATURES
By Alicia Robinson | June 18, 2007
NEWPORT BEACH — The Upper Newport Bay is trying to disappear, and Andrew Hunt is trying to stop it. He's the project engineer for DD-M Crane and Rigging, the construction contractor on the upper bay dredging project, and his job is to save a natural resource — a 1,000-acre estuary — by stopping a natural process. "A salt marsh by its nature destroys itself. It's constantly changing," Hunt said on a recent tour of the dredging project. "In 20 years' time, this all becomes meadows.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | September 5, 2006
The dredging equipment in the Upper Newport Bay fell idle in late July, but work will resume after the expected arrival today of a new dredge that can move dirt much faster. The dredging, an 18-month project that began in February, is part of a $39-million environmental restoration of the Back Bay. The bay is one of the largest wetlands in Southern California and is home to rare birds and other animals. Sediment must be removed from the shallow bay about every 20 years to keep it from becoming a meadow.
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