Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsConstitution
IN THE NEWS

Constitution

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 13, 2011
UC Irvine's law school dean and the Chapman University School of Law's former dean will battle it out Sept. 20 over the Constitution. UCI's Erwin Chemerinsky and Chapman's John Eastman, who serves as a visiting scholar at UC San Diego, will kick off Orange Coast College's Constitution Day by taking sides on the constitution for a debate. The free event, which is open to the public, will begin at 11 a.m. in the Robert B. Moore Theatre at OCC, 2701 Fairview Road, Costa Mesa.
NEWS
By Tom Egan | April 14, 2012
"A constitution can't be formed according to only one political spectrum, but it should be made for all Costa Mesans and for generations to come. " Stirring words that could have come from Costa Mesa. The man actually said "Egyptians," not "Costa Mesans. " The speaker's name is Abdel Aziz Nahhas, a member of an Egyptian political party opposing the constitution-writing assembly. The assembly has been mostly packed by members of the Muslim Brotherhood political party. Christians, secularists, liberals, and other groups have boycotted this assembly, fearing the Muslim Brotherhood and ultraconservative Salafis would put Islamic Sharia law into the new Egyptian constitution.
NEWS
November 4, 2009
I must respond to Russ Niewiarowski’s letter (“Obama renounces religion with bill,” Oct. 31) in which he denounces “the national acceptance of homosexuality” and urges Christian values on all of us. I would remind Niewiarowski that this nation was founded upon the separation of church and state, and that in any event, the Founding Fathers were mostly deists and not necessarily Christians. Thus, under our Constitution, the sexual preferences of people should be strictly voluntary choices made by the people themselves, rather than having these preferences dictated by “Christian values.
NEWS
July 4, 2000
Most historians agree that Hiram Johnson was one of California's great governors. Almost single-handedly, he brought down the Southern Pacific Railroad, which, at that time, had almost completely corrupted state government. Gov. Johnson, as an enthusiastic Populist, introduced three political concepts -- the initiative, the referendum and the recall. Each was trumpeted as a means of restoring power to the people. In the abstract, these concepts can't be faulted.
NEWS
By Dorothy Kraus | October 30, 2012
I am a member of the West Newport Beach Assn. (WNBA) and received a letter from them urging a no vote on Measure EE. The letter was also addressed to the Newport Beach City Council and outlined in plain and simple language the rationale behind the WNBA's position. What I've heard about Measure EE is that 38 changes to the city's charter (which I understand is like the city's constitution) would be made in a single measure versus separating them out and voting on them individually.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | August 2, 2013
The following question is meant to be practical, not philosophical, and your answer is important. Do you want unlimited government? That would mean that government would effectively take responsibility for deciding and controlling all aspects of our lives. Honestly, I don't think I have ever encountered anyone who wants that. One reason of course, is that unlimited government doesn't work. For example, the governments in China, Cuba and the former Soviet Union took away many personal freedoms, but they still had some limitations on government, and even then their systems were stagnant.
NEWS
March 24, 2010
In an opinion piece in the Orange County Register, U.S. Rep. John Campbell (R-Newport Beach) condemned Sunday night’s House vote on health-care legislation as “the day that the will of the American people and the founding tenets of the United States of America were subverted.” Campbell wrote that the voting bloc majority of 219 House representatives, all Democrats, who voted in favor of the bill, counted the Democratic party’s “most liberal elements” who knew that this bill would lead the U.S. “down a path toward full-blown, European-style government health care.
FEATURES
By Lauren Vane | September 22, 2006
Ed Averkieff was 9 years old when he first stepped aboard the U.S. battleship Constitution. It was 1931 and Old Ironsides was being towed around the country in an effort to raise money for a massive reconstruction of the historic battleship. Averkieff, now 84, was collecting pennies for the ship's restoration. It was the "thrill of his life" to visit the ship when it pulled into Long Beach 75 years ago, and it was an experience that never left him. "I had it in my heart ever since," said Averkieff of La Habra.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 2014
Show me a politician tangled up in corruption or a business person who has bent the rules, cooked the books, manipulated expense reports, fudged on production standards or otherwise buried the truth, and I will show you someone who cheated in school and got away with it. The parents of the children involved in the Corona del Mar High School cheating scandal, no matter the level of their culpability, have a unique opportunity to do the right thing....
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | March 20, 2014
A man accused in a lawsuit of filing a false drunk-driving report against Costa Mesa Mayor Jim Righeimer asserted his 5th Amendment right not to testify throughout a three-hour deposition on Thursday, attorneys said. Private investigator Chris Lanzillo invoked the constitutional protection against self-incrimination more than 200 times, said attorney John Manly, who represents Righeimer and Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger in the civil action filed against Lanzillo; the law firm that employed him, Lackie, Dammeier, McGill & Ethir; and the Costa Mesa Police Assn.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | August 2, 2013
The following question is meant to be practical, not philosophical, and your answer is important. Do you want unlimited government? That would mean that government would effectively take responsibility for deciding and controlling all aspects of our lives. Honestly, I don't think I have ever encountered anyone who wants that. One reason of course, is that unlimited government doesn't work. For example, the governments in China, Cuba and the former Soviet Union took away many personal freedoms, but they still had some limitations on government, and even then their systems were stagnant.
NEWS
By Rhea Mahbubani and By Rhea Mahbubani | February 12, 2013
Tuesday's Irvine City Council meeting was marked with an introductory moment of silence in memory of Keith Lawrence and Monica Quan, as well as two law enforcement officials who allegedly fell prey to former cop Christopher Dorner. Mayor Steven S. Choi also commended Roger Steeber, a U.S. Postal Service letter carrier for saving the life of an elderly Irvine resident on Sept. 17. Steeber was on his route when billowing smoke snagged his attention, leading him to the mobile home of Karen Petersen, 79. According to Orange County Fire Authority division Chief Michael Moore, the fire in question was moving fast on one of the windiest days of the year, and it was only Steeber's quick thinking that saved Petersen before she was overcome by smoke.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | February 7, 2013
UC Irvine law students will write a new constitution this weekend. Starting Friday, about 60 of them will attend the second annual Global Justice Summit and participate in a mock constitutional convention. By the end of the conference Saturday, the fictional countries of Ruja and Miliana will get a new structure of government, courts and some enumerated rights. The UCI law student who created the summit last year said he needed a brief break from the grind of law. So he created a utopian thought experiment - breaking away from the standard extracurricular activities like mock trials and law review.
NEWS
By Dorothy Kraus | October 30, 2012
I am a member of the West Newport Beach Assn. (WNBA) and received a letter from them urging a no vote on Measure EE. The letter was also addressed to the Newport Beach City Council and outlined in plain and simple language the rationale behind the WNBA's position. What I've heard about Measure EE is that 38 changes to the city's charter (which I understand is like the city's constitution) would be made in a single measure versus separating them out and voting on them individually.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | October 5, 2012
Costa Mesa's governance will shift toward increased local control should a majority of the city's voters approve a proposed charter in November's general election, advocates say. The ballot's charter initiative, Measure V, attempts to change Costa Mesa from a general-law city under the purview of state guidelines to being home-ruled by a charter. The major changes imposed by the charter, which would essentially serves as a city constitution, have been hotly defended and contested in the months since the document made the Nov. 6 ballot.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Harlan | September 15, 2012
Sept. 17 marks the 225th anniversary of the adoption of the United States Constitution by the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. As Costa Mesans consider adopting a new city constitution, we should look at our nation's seminal governing document and its history for some valuable lessons. When Benjamin Franklin emerged from Independence Hall after the document's signing, a woman approached him and asked, "What have we got — a republic or a monarchy?" Franklin replied, "A republic, if you can keep it. " Students of American history know that one of the central debates among the Founding Fathers was choosing the form of government — between a republic and a democracy.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | July 31, 2012
The Costa Mesa City Council on Tuesday evening approved putting a proposed city charter on the general election ballot, marking the first time in the city's nearly 60-year history that it could fundamentally change how it operates. In a 4-1 vote, with Councilwoman Wendy Leece dissenting, the move put the decision to enact the document — essentially a city constitution — to the will of voters in November. If approved by a majority, Costa Mesa would become a charter city, with municipal affairs such as zoning and public contracts under the rules of the city instead of the state constitution.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | July 30, 2012
The Costa Mesa City Council on Tuesday is expected to put its city charter plan on the general election ballot. A charter - a city constitution by another name - would allow municipal issues like zoning, city project funding and elections to be decided by the council. The meeting, which is the third and final discussion on the charter, is also the last chance for the council to amend it before sending it to the Nov. 6 ballot. Mayor Pro Tem Jim Righeimer introduced the charter idea late last year.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|