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NEWS
September 22, 1999
S.J. Cahn Former Rep. Bob Dornan "is inching closer to" a run against Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, and will make a final decision by the first week in October, Dornan said Tuesday. "Why should I not think about getting rid of (him)?" Dornan said, stressing that he feels Rohrabacher did not tell him the truth about his past drug use. Rohrabacher has admitted to using marijuana and LSD in the '60s. The only thing likely to keep him out of the race would be a new radio talk show contract.
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NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | August 12, 2007
What is one of the best ways to reduce taxes and still maintain appropriate services from the federal government? The answer is for Congress to pass sunset laws. What does that mean? It means that legislation should be passed requiring every federal agency to get an affirmative vote from Congress every seven years or so authorizing its continued existence. And along the way Congress could audit, assess and provide direction for all of the agencies that continue to function. Regardless of what one thinks about FDR's programs in the 1930s, are you aware many of the agencies established by the "New Deal" are still in existence today, if only under a different name?
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey and Alan Blank | May 13, 2009
State Assemblyman Van Tran’s decision to run for Congress, which he announced last week, is in a lot of ways the fulfillment of a prospect that has been on his radar for more than a decade. Before serving four years on the Garden Grove City Council and three terms in the state legislature, Tran started his political career as an aide to Republican Rep. Bob Dornan in the mid 1980s. Tran worked part time for the congressman while getting a political science degree from UCI. After spending 10 years as a lawyer, but before even being elected to city council, Tran says he was already being prodded in one way or another to run for Congress.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | April 8, 2010
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has asked Congress for $23.7 million in federal funding to clean up Newport Harbor. City officials expect to have word on whether the project will get a chunk of federal money later this year. Congress isn’t expected to approve appropriations until after the November election. Feinstein also helped obtain federal money to dredge Upper Newport Bay; Congress approved $17.3 million in stimulus money last year to finish dredging in the Upper Bay. That project is slated for completion later this year.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | April 6, 2010
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has asked Congress for $23.7 million in federal funding to clean up Newport Harbor. City officials expect to have word on whether the project will get a chunk of federal money later this year. Congress isn’t expected to approve appropriations until after the November election. Feinstein also played a role in obtaining federal money to dredge Upper Newport Bay — Congress approved $17.3 million in federal stimulus money last year to finish dredging in the Upper Bay. That project is slated for completion later this year.
BUSINESS
By Michael Miller | March 13, 2008
The Newport Beach resident who runs a slaughterhouse that recalled 143 million pounds of beef admitted Wednesday before Congress that his company processed sick cattle as food. Steve Mendell, the owner of the Westland/Hallmark Meat Co. in Chino, initially told a congressional panel that the sick cows had been euthanized rather than converted into ground beef. After a screening of an undercover videotape taken by the Humane Society of the United States, however, Mendell retracted his comments.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander and Chris Caesar | March 28, 2008
A Sacramento judge Friday tossed a lawsuit to keep congressional candidate Debbie Cook from using her title as Huntington Beach mayor on the June primary ballot. A second lawsuit brought by Orange County Republican lawyer Mike Schroeder on behalf of his client Keith Carlson, treasurer of the Orange County Republican Party and a Huntington Beach resident, went before a judge at 1:30 p.m. Friday. By the end of the day it was dismissed, both on its merits and a technicality: Schroeder had failed to serve papers to Cook, as required.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | May 16, 2009
Costa Mesa invested $5 million in Lehman Brothers corporate notes, which went from outwardly rock-solid investments to near-worthless pieces of paper overnight when the company declared bankruptcy in September. Around the same time, the federal government was bailing out several large banks, but decided to let the 150-year-old investment firm fail. Just hours before the company went under, its debts were A-rated, meaning there was little risk the company would default. When Costa Mesa’s finance director, Marc Puckett, found out about the loss, he formed a coalition of other cities and local agencies up and down the state that had also lost millions with Lehman.
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