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Cold War

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Titus | February 9, 2012
Were Hugh Whitemore's "Pack of Lies" merely a work of fiction, detailing a manufactured anecdote from the Cold War, it would be engrossing enough. However, the events portrayed in this haunting episode are, in fact, true, which heightens the play's impact considerably. Now on stage at the Newport Theatre Arts Center, "Pack of Lies" rewinds history a half century, focusing on a normal English family in the early 1960s, whose placid life becomes shattered when they learn that their neighbors - in fact, their closest friends - may be Soviet spies.
NEWS
January 12, 2009
In response to Dick Lewis? peevish accusation that I was in high dudgeon over Lenard Davis? letter (?Ideologies aren?t necessarily pure,? Sounding Off, Jan. 1), quite so, as I am always in high dudgeon when confronted with liberal revisionist history. In particular, Lewis seems vexed that I mentioned the Cold War and the Soviet infiltration of our government. He follows with the preposterous notion that I have ?uncovered a mountain of evidence? when, of course, I said there is a mountain of evidence available to anyone who wants to put forward the slightest effort in researching the matter.
NEWS
May 18, 2001
Whether you're interested in espionage as escape or true spy sagas, there's a world of intrigue in contemporary novels and nonfiction. If the edge of your seat is not comfy, you may want to pass on Robert Ludlum's "The Cassandra Compact," due out this month. In his second biotech thriller, the master of suspense sends a team of covert operators careening through a corpse-strewn plot involving the theft of a deadly virus. The mystery is not so much whodunit, but why they'd want the pox and what they plan to do with it. Another teller of compelling tales is in top form in "The Constant Gardener," a dark mystery about corrupt pharmaceutical companies.
NEWS
March 28, 2004
POLITICS AND ENVIRONMENT Former leader of Soviet Union visits UC Irvine Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev visited UC Irvine on Tuesday to receive the school's inaugural Citizen Peacebuilding Award, which will be named for him. The Russian leader is credited with moving his nation from communist rule to government that is more democratic and helping to end the Cold War. At the event Gorbachev spoke about...
NEWS
March 23, 2004
Alicia Robinson While Mikhail Gorbachev's accomplishments may not be recognized in the country he once led, the former president of the Soviet Union and Nobel Peace Prize laureate will be honored at UC Irvine tonight as the first recipient of an award that will bear his name. Gorbachev will speak at the university and then be presented with the inaugural UCI Citizen Peacebuilding award, said Paula Garb, professor of anthropology and a founder of the UCI Citizen Peacebuilding program.
FEATURES
October 22, 2006
On Oct. 17, 1917, a French firing squad executed Dutch citizen Margaretha Zelle for spying. There is now little evidence that her infamous relations with the officers of various armies yielded any valuable information, but the French needed a scapegoat for the disastrous battlefield losses of 1917. And so, the glamorous Mata Hari died as spectacularly as she had lived. Even though she may not have been an effective spy, Zelle's profession is one of the oldest in the world. No, not that one — the double agent one. Though Rudyard Kipling's "Kim" (1901)
NEWS
January 28, 2000
Andrew Glazer COSTA MESA -- While many presidential hopefuls are pushing each other for camera time in the blustery New Hampshire cold, Republican candidate Joe Schriner played with his family in sunny Balearic Park. "Who do you think the sane candidate is?" asked Schriner, 44, who wore two days of stubble and a flannel shirt with rolled-up sleeves. "Average Joe" Schriner and his staff -- wife Liz, feisty daughter Sarah, 4, and sleepy son, Joseph, 2 -- have traveled the country since April, when he declared he would seek the Republican Party's nomination for presidential candidate at the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | September 11, 2006
However much safer America has been made in the five years since 9/11, the nation still faces major threats to security and a war of unknown length. That's the view of Newport Beach Rep. John Campbell, who had not begun his political career at the time of the attacks but still feels irreparably changed by them. "The answer to 'Are we safe?' is a very complicated one — Are we safer? Absolutely, and we've done many things to make us safer," Campbell said. There hasn't been an attack on American soil or on an American embassy in the last five years, and that's a sign of progress, Campbell said.
SPORTS
By By Matt Lewis | November 14, 2005
At age 81, former film writer has had recent success competing in tennis all over the world.Victor Fotre's story would have many interesting episodes. The best candidate to write the story would likely be himself. The 81-year-old former film writer penned the scripts for movies in the 1950s and '60s. He was commissioned to make anti-communist movies by the Department of the Defense during the Cold War. Now, he has moved from behind the scenes to center stage. Earlier this year, competing in tennis, the Mesa Verde Country Club member won the National Indoor championships for his age group in Vancouver, Wash.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
It would be easy to explain what a treasured son the Newport-Mesa community lost when George Yardley passed away this month by listing just his athletic accomplishments. He was a three-time All-American at Stanford, where he set the school's single-season scoring record. He was the first NBA player to score 2,000 points in a season. During his seven-year career, he was named an All-Star six times and averaged 19.2 points and 8.9 rebounds a game. He eventually was voted into the Naismith Hall of Fame.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2014
Along with its manicured greenbelts and meticulously neat neighborhoods, Irvine suddenly has something else on its hands: an international incident. Members of its vast Chinese American community are fighting a city decision to bow to the demands of Vietnamese Americans, who arrived by the hundreds this month to demand that Irvine abandon its plans to formalize a relationship with a town in coastal Vietnam. A parade of speakers spent hours pleading with council members to reject the proposal, saying it would be insulting for the city to forge a “friendship” with a country they'd fled to escape a brutal communist regime.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Titus | February 9, 2012
Were Hugh Whitemore's "Pack of Lies" merely a work of fiction, detailing a manufactured anecdote from the Cold War, it would be engrossing enough. However, the events portrayed in this haunting episode are, in fact, true, which heightens the play's impact considerably. Now on stage at the Newport Theatre Arts Center, "Pack of Lies" rewinds history a half century, focusing on a normal English family in the early 1960s, whose placid life becomes shattered when they learn that their neighbors - in fact, their closest friends - may be Soviet spies.
NEWS
January 12, 2009
In response to Dick Lewis? peevish accusation that I was in high dudgeon over Lenard Davis? letter (?Ideologies aren?t necessarily pure,? Sounding Off, Jan. 1), quite so, as I am always in high dudgeon when confronted with liberal revisionist history. In particular, Lewis seems vexed that I mentioned the Cold War and the Soviet infiltration of our government. He follows with the preposterous notion that I have ?uncovered a mountain of evidence? when, of course, I said there is a mountain of evidence available to anyone who wants to put forward the slightest effort in researching the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN DEPKO AND SUSANNE PEREZ | May 29, 2008
The venerable Lido Theatre in Newport has featured a number of offbeat films that defy usual Hollywood categories. “Surfwise” is no exception. This documentary covers the extraordinary life and times of a nomadic family during more than 20 years of unconventional living. Dorian Paskowitz had worked hard to become a successful doctor. But the tough demands of his work led him to examine the fundamentals of his lifestyle. At the peak of his career he abandoned his practice and chose to become a wandering surf bum. He went wherever the waves beckoned and met a woman who agreed to become his traveling companion.
FEATURES
By PETER BUFFA | May 11, 2008
“This is a test, this is a test. If this were an actual emergency, you’d be on your own, bud.” You might be hearing those words, some of them anyway, from the city of Newport Beach on May 22. That’s the day they’re going to test a number of siren and PA systems at the Balboa Pier from 10 a.m. to noon. Why? It’s the tsunami thing. When it comes to tidal waves and in-laws, nobody likes surprises. The city wants to see how well various siren and alarm systems work and how far away they can be heard when something really unpleasant is about to happen individually.
FEATURES
October 22, 2006
On Oct. 17, 1917, a French firing squad executed Dutch citizen Margaretha Zelle for spying. There is now little evidence that her infamous relations with the officers of various armies yielded any valuable information, but the French needed a scapegoat for the disastrous battlefield losses of 1917. And so, the glamorous Mata Hari died as spectacularly as she had lived. Even though she may not have been an effective spy, Zelle's profession is one of the oldest in the world. No, not that one — the double agent one. Though Rudyard Kipling's "Kim" (1901)
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | September 11, 2006
However much safer America has been made in the five years since 9/11, the nation still faces major threats to security and a war of unknown length. That's the view of Newport Beach Rep. John Campbell, who had not begun his political career at the time of the attacks but still feels irreparably changed by them. "The answer to 'Are we safe?' is a very complicated one — Are we safer? Absolutely, and we've done many things to make us safer," Campbell said. There hasn't been an attack on American soil or on an American embassy in the last five years, and that's a sign of progress, Campbell said.
LOCAL
By Kathleen Stinson | March 13, 2006
Sure it's always cold each year when the aspiring Newport Beach lifeguards jump into the ocean to compete for the summer job, but Sunday was a bit chillier than usual. "I've been a junior lifeguard for six years and this is the coldest it's ever been ? but it's a good experience," said Ryan Shaver, 17, of Huntington Beach. Julia Relph, 18, of San Diego, said she got talked into competing Sunday by some of her friends. "The water was freezing and my face is numb," Relph said.
SPORTS
By By Matt Lewis | November 14, 2005
At age 81, former film writer has had recent success competing in tennis all over the world.Victor Fotre's story would have many interesting episodes. The best candidate to write the story would likely be himself. The 81-year-old former film writer penned the scripts for movies in the 1950s and '60s. He was commissioned to make anti-communist movies by the Department of the Defense during the Cold War. Now, he has moved from behind the scenes to center stage. Earlier this year, competing in tennis, the Mesa Verde Country Club member won the National Indoor championships for his age group in Vancouver, Wash.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
It would be easy to explain what a treasured son the Newport-Mesa community lost when George Yardley passed away this month by listing just his athletic accomplishments. He was a three-time All-American at Stanford, where he set the school's single-season scoring record. He was the first NBA player to score 2,000 points in a season. During his seven-year career, he was named an All-Star six times and averaged 19.2 points and 8.9 rebounds a game. He eventually was voted into the Naismith Hall of Fame.
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