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Childhood Obesity

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NEWS
By Hojjat Sandi | October 28, 2011
It's no secret that childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States. In fact, over the past 30 years, childhood obesity rates have tripled. Given the advancements in science and medicine during that same time frame, not to mention improvements in how schools educate children about eating and exercising properly, this is surprising and alarming. As rates continue to rise, what can we do to combat childhood obesity? As an educator, I believe it's going to take a group effort.
NEWS
May 3, 2005
Elia Powers Jennifer Contreras has never had a problem motivating her daughter to study. Eleven-year-old Alexandra is in fact a straight-A student. Still, Contreras' lectures on eating a healthy diet weren't well received, she said. "She always had a weight problem, but she didn't want to hear it from me," Contreras said. "She was a nervous eater who couldn't master the problem." Contreras, a Mission Viejo resident, registered her daughter more than a year-and-a-half ago in a weight-control program run by Costa Mesa-based Lindora Medical Clinics.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | December 28, 2010
An Irvine man persuaded 40 people to invest a total of $2.4 million in his Newport Beach-based business that claimed to sell a product combating childhood obesity, but instead of making money for them he spent all of their money on himself, according to federal prosecutors. In an indictment unsealed last week by a federal grand jury, Charles "Chuck" Davis, 53, was charged with 10 felony counts of defrauding investors. He pleaded not guilty in court Monday and was released on a $160,000 bond.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
Marisa O'Neil Call high-schoolers the "guava nectar generation." With increasing emphasis on a healthy diet and concern of childhood obesity, the American Academy of Pediatrics is coming out against the sugary sodas that fueled the previous "Pepsi Generation." Newport-Mesa stopped selling the carbonated soft drinks on elementary and middle school campuses in 1997 and in high schools this year. Now the district is in the process of replacing the old soda vending machines with new ones offering milk, water and exotic juices.
SPORTS
By Steve Virgen | March 19, 2010
CORONA DEL MAR — For just over two months, Jack Tucker has been running and training for what will be an important day for him on Sunday. He wants to represent his school, Eastblutf Elementary, the best he can at the 27th annual Spirit Run, which begins at Fashion Island. The 11-year-old will compete in the 5K (3.1 miles) and the one-mile run. But as he tries for personal-best times, Jack has also been doing his best to shatter stereotypes of kids his age. “I don’t really play much video games,” Jack says.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | October 29, 2011
In keeping with the season, I'm going to tell a scary story. This isn't your typical dark-and-stormy-night tale of horror. It's about monsters lurking in our kids' lunch boxes, sinister snacks living in our pantries and nutrition-less ghouls masquerading as meals. At the risk of being a major spoilsport for harping about the importance of healthy eating right before Halloween, I nonetheless would like to point out some frightening statistics. Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the United States in the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
August 24, 2002
Added to the growing list of things that kids can no longer do is the news that American children are walking or bicycling to school in far fewer numbers. This, in turn, has contributed to the increase in childhood obesity. The report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention listed four main reasons why kids aren't walking or biking to school: traffic, weather, crime and distance. But my not-so-scientific research has revealed another reason, one that trumps all the excuses offered by the CDC. First, however, let's tackle CDC's list as it pertains to our local kids and schools.
LOCAL
By STEVE SMITH | April 21, 2008
We have a lot of overweight kids in America, but you’d never know it was a problem. We disguise the epidemic by using the words “overweight” and “obese.” Even the American Pediatric Assn. has succumbed to the use of politically correct euphemisms and is hosting a conference next year titled, “A New Spin on Childhood Obesity.” We don’t need a new spin. We need to bring back plain talk and once again start calling these kids fat because that’s what they are. Instead, we dress up the problem in style and call it a disease when it is not. For nearly all fat kids, their weight is a choice; one that many times is enabled by parents who feed them lousy food and allow them to watch too much TV and play too many video games.
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | November 18, 2007
Our children have an obesity crisis. Today, 15% of our children between the ages of 6 and 17 are obese, which is up from only 5% in the late 1970s. Of course, this is not just limited to children, because 20% of all the residents in 47 states in our country are obese. That is a sizable increase because as late as 1990, no state was above 15%. California is presently 36th worst in the nation for adult obesity, and 32nd worst for childhood obesity. So what difference does this make?
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | October 29, 2011
In keeping with the season, I'm going to tell a scary story. This isn't your typical dark-and-stormy-night tale of horror. It's about monsters lurking in our kids' lunch boxes, sinister snacks living in our pantries and nutrition-less ghouls masquerading as meals. At the risk of being a major spoilsport for harping about the importance of healthy eating right before Halloween, I nonetheless would like to point out some frightening statistics. Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the United States in the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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NEWS
By Hojjat Sandi | October 28, 2011
It's no secret that childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States. In fact, over the past 30 years, childhood obesity rates have tripled. Given the advancements in science and medicine during that same time frame, not to mention improvements in how schools educate children about eating and exercising properly, this is surprising and alarming. As rates continue to rise, what can we do to combat childhood obesity? As an educator, I believe it's going to take a group effort.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | December 28, 2010
An Irvine man persuaded 40 people to invest a total of $2.4 million in his Newport Beach-based business that claimed to sell a product combating childhood obesity, but instead of making money for them he spent all of their money on himself, according to federal prosecutors. In an indictment unsealed last week by a federal grand jury, Charles "Chuck" Davis, 53, was charged with 10 felony counts of defrauding investors. He pleaded not guilty in court Monday and was released on a $160,000 bond.
SPORTS
By Steve Virgen | March 19, 2010
CORONA DEL MAR — For just over two months, Jack Tucker has been running and training for what will be an important day for him on Sunday. He wants to represent his school, Eastblutf Elementary, the best he can at the 27th annual Spirit Run, which begins at Fashion Island. The 11-year-old will compete in the 5K (3.1 miles) and the one-mile run. But as he tries for personal-best times, Jack has also been doing his best to shatter stereotypes of kids his age. “I don’t really play much video games,” Jack says.
LOCAL
By STEVE SMITH | April 21, 2008
We have a lot of overweight kids in America, but you’d never know it was a problem. We disguise the epidemic by using the words “overweight” and “obese.” Even the American Pediatric Assn. has succumbed to the use of politically correct euphemisms and is hosting a conference next year titled, “A New Spin on Childhood Obesity.” We don’t need a new spin. We need to bring back plain talk and once again start calling these kids fat because that’s what they are. Instead, we dress up the problem in style and call it a disease when it is not. For nearly all fat kids, their weight is a choice; one that many times is enabled by parents who feed them lousy food and allow them to watch too much TV and play too many video games.
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | November 18, 2007
Our children have an obesity crisis. Today, 15% of our children between the ages of 6 and 17 are obese, which is up from only 5% in the late 1970s. Of course, this is not just limited to children, because 20% of all the residents in 47 states in our country are obese. That is a sizable increase because as late as 1990, no state was above 15%. California is presently 36th worst in the nation for adult obesity, and 32nd worst for childhood obesity. So what difference does this make?
NEWS
May 3, 2005
Elia Powers Jennifer Contreras has never had a problem motivating her daughter to study. Eleven-year-old Alexandra is in fact a straight-A student. Still, Contreras' lectures on eating a healthy diet weren't well received, she said. "She always had a weight problem, but she didn't want to hear it from me," Contreras said. "She was a nervous eater who couldn't master the problem." Contreras, a Mission Viejo resident, registered her daughter more than a year-and-a-half ago in a weight-control program run by Costa Mesa-based Lindora Medical Clinics.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
Marisa O'Neil Call high-schoolers the "guava nectar generation." With increasing emphasis on a healthy diet and concern of childhood obesity, the American Academy of Pediatrics is coming out against the sugary sodas that fueled the previous "Pepsi Generation." Newport-Mesa stopped selling the carbonated soft drinks on elementary and middle school campuses in 1997 and in high schools this year. Now the district is in the process of replacing the old soda vending machines with new ones offering milk, water and exotic juices.
NEWS
August 24, 2002
Added to the growing list of things that kids can no longer do is the news that American children are walking or bicycling to school in far fewer numbers. This, in turn, has contributed to the increase in childhood obesity. The report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention listed four main reasons why kids aren't walking or biking to school: traffic, weather, crime and distance. But my not-so-scientific research has revealed another reason, one that trumps all the excuses offered by the CDC. First, however, let's tackle CDC's list as it pertains to our local kids and schools.
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