Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsChemotherapy
IN THE NEWS

Chemotherapy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 19, 2012
UC Irvine researchers announced this week that they have had a breakthrough in melanoma research, discovering why the deadly skin cancer is largely resistant to chemotherapy and other existing therapies. UCI dermatologist Dr. Anand Ganesan and a team have been researching melanoma, which kills 10,000 people in the United States yearly, since 2007. They dissected melanoma cells and performed a genome-wide scan, finding that two genes, RhoJ and Pak1, prevent cells from "sensing" when they are damaged and therefore build up a tolerance to cancer-killing drugs.
FEATURES
By Sue Thoensen | October 24, 2007
A soothing touch and sense of inner peace is what volunteer therapists at Spa Gregorie’s in Newport Beach hope to impart to their cancer patients. Massage therapist and co-founder Johnette du Rand started Spa Gregorie’s Greet the Day program in 2003, offering patients undergoing chemotherapy complimentary spa treatments at a four-hour “Spa Day Retreat” at one of their locations. The spa works with physicians and oncologists at cancer treatment centers, and patients must have a referral from the center along with a doctor’s release before they may participate in the spa day program.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | July 7, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — Hoag Cancer Center now has a small library, thanks to a group of Newport Elementary School students who collected close to 100 books, then donated them to the center today. The book drive began about a month ago after a pair of children noticed that the patient reception area didn't have anything for them to read. They'd been waiting for their mother, who was undergoing a serious round of chemotherapy for breast cancer, which had spread throughout parts of her body.
NEWS
By By Andrew Edwards | November 21, 2005
Wiggin Out, a salon in Newport Beach, can use clients' own locks to craft post-chemotherapy hair extensions.Let's make one thing clear: Newport Beach's Wiggin Out Salon is not a wig store. In fact, owner Constance Walsh had a specifically anti-wig agenda when she opened her salon. "It was created so that women wouldn't have to wear wigs," Walsh said. Her idea was to provide a service for women who have undergone chemotherapy and lost their hair. Walsh and her three employees can craft hair extensions by cutting a clients' hair and saving it for when she finishes treatment.
NEWS
August 23, 2000
Jennifer Kho Bouncing up and down and yelling "Yay, yay, yay! Out, out, out!" Hannah Butler, 8, anticipates the end of her chemotherapy treatment. She is friendly and high-spirited, and has battled bone marrow leukemia with endurance and energy for more than two years. Hannah goes to the doctor for blood tests every two weeks, takes daily chemotherapy pills and has regular spinal taps, biopsies and shots in her legs, spine and chest. She has a catheter in her chest for chemotherapy injections and sometimes she can't leave the house for weeks at a time because her immune system is weak from medication.
NEWS
April 10, 2004
Steve Virgen Water is a symbol for rebirth, and for cleansing. This has been true in Amy Catlin's life. She began swimming when she was 8 and showed great promise at age 12, but something happened to her that altered her life. Before, her challenges were all about beating a time on a stopwatch. But suddenly she took on tests of will and overcoming a life-threatening illness: leukemia. Catlin, a Corona del Mar High junior, seemingly used the water as a source of strength and refuge from her battles with leukemia and other ailments.
NEWS
March 4, 2001
Roger Carlson NEWPORT BEACH - It's one thing to envision yourself on a trail, suddenly confronted with a tiger in your path, holding your ground and staring it down without a twitch. Surely, it's not easily done. Linda Isle resident Paul Salata not only looked the tiger in the eye, but sent it away laughing. The 74-year-old ironman has spent a great deal of his life doing for others. And he has provided Newport Beach with the unique reputation surrounding his favorite pastime, Irrelevant Week, honoring the last player taken in the annual National Football League draft.
NEWS
June 25, 2005
ROGER CARLSON The Big Easy didn't seem to be all that easy, at times, over the past nine months. But I have to tell you something: It's a lot easier right now. A few days ago my chemotherapy doctor told me he'd like to see me in three months for a checkup and gave me my graduation diploma by way of a doctor's order to get rid of this thing inbedded in my chest called a port-a-cath. The device is a little button that makes it a lot easier to apply the medication that has made me whole.
NEWS
By Alexandra Baird, dailypilot@latimes.com | June 24, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — Julian Dunn, 7, did a warm-up dance in his living room Friday morning to his favorite song, "You Dropped a Bomb on Me," by the '80s funk group the Gap Band. Julian, who has been undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment for an aggressive form of cancer, was gearing up for a special visit at his Newport Beach home. The Game Bus, a converted school bus filled with video game consoles and big-screen TVs, stopped by to treat Julian and his friends to an hour of fun. Julian was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2008.
NEWS
July 16, 2004
Deepa Bharath There's one thing Costa Mesa Police Officer Dave Makiyama can't do very well. Quit. Give up. Take it lying down. The 43-year-old officer, who was a training officer and tactical team leader for the department's SWAT team, learned he had cancer in May 2003. "It was a shock," said the mild-mannered officer, who returned to active, full-time duty on July 6. Makiyama went to the doctor after he observed a lump on his chest that was growing larger.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By David Carrillo Peñaloza | October 25, 2012
Last week was a special one for junior Oronde Crenshaw. His parents showed up to watch him play a football game for Costa Mesa High. To have his mother and father, along with his siblings, aunts and grandparents, at one of his games is rare. His father, DeWayne Crenshaw, lives in Utah. His mother, Lilia Mora, has a hard time walking up and down the bleachers. He understands why his dad cannot come to every game because of the distance. Talking about why his mom cannot always be there is hard for Crenshaw.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 19, 2012
UC Irvine researchers announced this week that they have had a breakthrough in melanoma research, discovering why the deadly skin cancer is largely resistant to chemotherapy and other existing therapies. UCI dermatologist Dr. Anand Ganesan and a team have been researching melanoma, which kills 10,000 people in the United States yearly, since 2007. They dissected melanoma cells and performed a genome-wide scan, finding that two genes, RhoJ and Pak1, prevent cells from "sensing" when they are damaged and therefore build up a tolerance to cancer-killing drugs.
NEWS
By Jenny Stockdale and By Jenny Stockdale | August 30, 2012
Knots of Love, which donates handmade caps to chemotherapy patients, is vying for votes next month for a grant worth up to $250,000. Beginning Sept. 6, the Costa Mesa nonprofit will compete alongside nearly 30,000 other charities eligible to receive grant money from the Chase Community Giving 2012 program. Chase media contact Eileen Leveckis confirmed that the charity to receive the most votes could be awarded up to $250,000. An additional 195 top charities could receive anywhere from $10,000 to $100,000, depending on voting results.
SPORTS
By Steve Virgen | August 7, 2012
Gabriel Lalli's body has broken down. His eyesight has faded. He isn't the man he was two years ago. But that's with regard to his physical status. Cancer can break down anyone, yet it hasn't wilted his fighting spirit. Lalli, a Newport Beach resident, was active in running, rugby and soccer before being diagnosed with cancer in 2010. Now all of his focus has been turned toward beating the disease. Adversity hasn't just afflicted his health. Lalli said the bank mortgage company he worked for ended his employment and his income is now from disability checks.
SPORTS
By Steve Virgen | May 10, 2012
There wasn't a big match to be played on Tuesday, but a member of the UC Irvine men's volleyball team remained nervous for an important event dealing with the Anteaters. If you were at the celebration ceremony to honor the UCI team's national championship you wouldn't notice he was a bit anxious. But you could understand his excitement. There he was, Kevin Freeman, in his No. 1 gold jersey standing with his teammates at UCI. It was a big day for him. "I was happy to be with everybody," Kevin said a day later.
NEWS
By Alexandra Baird, dailypilot@latimes.com | June 24, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — Julian Dunn, 7, did a warm-up dance in his living room Friday morning to his favorite song, "You Dropped a Bomb on Me," by the '80s funk group the Gap Band. Julian, who has been undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment for an aggressive form of cancer, was gearing up for a special visit at his Newport Beach home. The Game Bus, a converted school bus filled with video game consoles and big-screen TVs, stopped by to treat Julian and his friends to an hour of fun. Julian was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2008.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | July 7, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — Hoag Cancer Center now has a small library, thanks to a group of Newport Elementary School students who collected close to 100 books, then donated them to the center today. The book drive began about a month ago after a pair of children noticed that the patient reception area didn't have anything for them to read. They'd been waiting for their mother, who was undergoing a serious round of chemotherapy for breast cancer, which had spread throughout parts of her body.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | June 15, 2010
She knew sign language and would often sign while she played the piano and sang. It was the epitome of multitasking, and even though her students were just kindergartners, she tried to pass on these attributes to them through the years. But on Monday, Andersen Elementary in Newport Beach "lost a legend" in Carol Jewell, who taught at the school for more than two decades but died of cancer after a two-year battle, Principal Mary Manos said Tuesday. Jewell was 68. "It's so sad," Manos said.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | August 19, 2009
Cancer made 11-year-old Tommy Conforti and movie producer Frankie Smith friends. Tommy has acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The disease attacks the body’s white blood cells and weakens the immune system. Smith, who lives in Corona del Mar, was diagnosed with the same disease when he was 14. He and Tommy met through one of Tommy’s neighbors, who suggested the two cancer survivors get to know each other. Now, the two trade sarcastic jokes and talk about movies together like brothers.
FEATURES
By Sue Thoensen | March 19, 2008
This corrects an earlier version of the story. Christine Shively didn’t know the bald woman she saw coming out of the hospital’s cancer ward last summer, and she hadn’t crocheted in more than 30 years. Still, with time on her hands, and the woman’s image fresh in her mind, Shively went home, brushed up on her skills and began crocheting brightly colored “chemo caps” she would then donate to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Knots-Of-Love, the organization Shively founded in her Newport Beach home, was born within days.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|