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NEWS
June 25, 2008
The Orange County Water District is suing industrial companies throughout the county for allegedly polluting the water supply, including one company in Costa Mesa and several in Santa Ana. By contaminating the groundwater basin with volatile organic chemicals and perchlorate, the companies are “posing a serious and substantial threat to the public health and environment,” the lawsuit reads. The district seeks to fine the companies the money it would cost to investigate claims of contamination and clean up wherever necessary.
NEWS
July 27, 2001
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- Like UC Irvine, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District does not have sprinkler systems in its science labs. And it's no oversight, officials say. "Some of the things they do in there can be ignited by the oxygen in water," said Eric Jetta, director of facilities and maintenance operations for the district. "So designers of that [UCI] building designed it not to have water sprinklers." An explosion and fire erupted in a UCI chemistry lab on Monday when graduate student Cy Fujimoto, 28, was purifying benzene.
LOCAL
By Joseph Serna and Kelly Strodl | December 12, 2007
An Ensign Intermediate School seventh grader was arrested Tuesday after bringing a bomb on campus, police said. Newport Beach police took the 12-year-old boy into custody on suspicion of possession of an explosive device, Sgt. Evan Sailor said. The boy, whose name is being withheld because of his age, is being held in protective custody at Orange County Juvenile Hall. The suspect was caught with a plastic bottle that had a household powder and liquid inside and regular batteries, authorities said.
NEWS
April 25, 2000
What's unfortunate in the prelude leading up to the June 6 vote on Measure A is the likelihood that nine out of 10 voters won't bother themselves to pick up a copy of the bond resolution or the facilities master plan and give them a good hard study; won't invest the mental calories required to make an informed decision about an important issue. And that's too bad. Here's why. To his credit, Steve Smith has done what most of us won't do ("Tossing bricks at the list of school 'repairs,"' April 22)
NEWS
By Emily Jeffers | November 23, 2013
A new study of hazardous hydraulic fracturing chemicals used in offshore oil wells in Southern California reveals the dangers of fracking to wildlife and human health, according to the Associated Press . My organization's analysis of chemicals used in 12 recent frack jobs in state waters near Long Beach reveals that at least one-third of those chemicals are suspected ecological hazards. More than a third are suspected of affecting the human developmental and nervous systems. The chemical X-Cide, used in all 12 offshore frack jobs examined by my organization, is classified as a hazardous substance by the federal agency that manages cleanup at Superfund sites.
NEWS
December 14, 2004
Jeff Benson The pink and green mixtures that the Wilson Elementary School fifth-graders held up in their test tubes Friday were good indicators that each of them understood the assignment. That's exactly what they were -- indicators, or chemicals that change colors in the presence of an acid or a base. Students in Audrey Woolfolk's class Friday mixed cabbage juice separately with acetic acid (vinegar), potassium bitartrate (cream of tartar), sodium hypochlorite (liquid bleach)
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 21, 2006
When students in Scott Smith's science class sit down for Thanksgiving dinner this week, chances are they'll know exactly what they're eating. On Thursday, Smith's freshman class at Newport Harbor High School did a lab in which they took three holiday meal staples — turkey, peas and carrots — and tested their chemical contents. With the rations coming out of baby food jars, the students poured them into test tubes and mixed in chemicals to check for starch, sugar and protein.
NEWS
April 8, 2001
Stefanie Frith COSTA MESA -- Kyndall Long wasn't too happy when her mother, Kellie, told her to put the computer away in the kitchen Friday night. But the 10-year-old fourth grader said now she is glad her mom made her do the chore. "I was putting away the computer and I looked out across the street and saw that our neighbor's [front porch] was on fire," Kyndall said. "I looked out, and the flames were huge. It was really, really high." Immediately, Kyndall ran to tell Kellie and got her dad, Michael, from his office in the back garage.
NEWS
May 5, 2000
Alex Coolman The use of pesticides in Orange County -- including some chemicals considered highly toxic and carcinogenic -- increased dramatically during the 1990s, according to a report released Wednesday by an environmental group. The report by Pesticide Action Network, a San Francisco nonprofit group, is a comprehensive study of pesticide use across California, with data broken down by region and by county. Between 1991-98 in Orange County, the group concluded that use of a class of pesticides known as "bad actors" increased by 51%. The "bad actor" class of chemicals includes acute poisons, carcinogens, reproductive or developmental toxins, neurotoxins and ground water contaminants.
NEWS
April 20, 2000
Alex Coolman Jack Skinner doesn't worry too much about the pollution he can see floating around Upper Newport Bay. Sure, it's bad to have Styrofoam cups and Bic lighters bobbing on the surface, but at least they are visible. It's fairly easy to pick up such garbage or filter it out of the water. What really worries the Newport Beach environmentalist, however, is the pollution he can't see: the cocktail of chemicals that gradually flows into the bay from the watershed and eventually settles into the mud on the bottom, where it can remain for decades.
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NEWS
By Emily Jeffers | November 23, 2013
A new study of hazardous hydraulic fracturing chemicals used in offshore oil wells in Southern California reveals the dangers of fracking to wildlife and human health, according to the Associated Press . My organization's analysis of chemicals used in 12 recent frack jobs in state waters near Long Beach reveals that at least one-third of those chemicals are suspected ecological hazards. More than a third are suspected of affecting the human developmental and nervous systems. The chemical X-Cide, used in all 12 offshore frack jobs examined by my organization, is classified as a hazardous substance by the federal agency that manages cleanup at Superfund sites.
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NEWS
By Brittany Woolsey | August 25, 2012
Cafecito Organico is opening up shop in Costa Mesa. The coffee shop, which holds philosophies in authenticity, recycling and earth-grown goods, opens Saturday at the Lab. "We're very excited to be at the Lab, a sort of landmark in Costa Mesa," said cafe co-owner Angel Orozco. "Our concept fits really well in terms of developing this site. We're looking forward to meeting the community and bringing good coffee to the city. " Cafecito Organico grows all its beans without chemicals and roasts them in a "green" coffee roaster that was designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption by up to 80%. The company also prides itself on affordability, with many drinks costing no more than $4. Cafecito Organico's specialty drinks — the Cafecito and Global Warming — are $5. The business also believes in a zero-waste concept, using items like biodegradable soap.
LOCAL
June 3, 2009
Submitted by Stephen Gregg At risk teens often walk down the path of drugs and alcohol abuse. Operation Clean Slate has found art to be a creative alternative to these destructive choices. Troubled teens from the Coastal Mountain Youth Academy have taken part in an Operation Clean Slate project and have created a mural for New Directions for Women, a chemical dependency treatment center in Costa Mesa. “It’s heartbreaking to see teens experience these events, but we’re glad that they are getting help early in their young lives, and we’re grateful for the mural they’ve created for us,” said Rebecca Flood CEO, of New Directions for Women.
LOCAL
March 5, 2009
UCI scientists have discovered a chemical compound that reverses memory loss in people with Huntington?s disease, university officials said. Neurobiologists Gary Lynch, Danielle Simmons found that a mild ampakine treatment on mice produced dramatic amounts of the brain?s own chemicals that create and store memories. The study reveals the potential of Lynche?s ampakine-base drugs, which are being used in Alzheimer?s disease clinical trials. The chemical compound was originally created to combat Alzheimer?
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 28, 2008
The discovery of high levels of a potentially toxic chemical element has put a kink in efforts to restore Big Canyon Creek Nature Park. Recent water testing uncovered high levels of the element selenium in the creek and freshwater marshes in the nature park. Selenium is a chemical element that occurs naturally. Trace amounts of the substance are part of the cellular function of most animals, but large amounts can be toxic to wildlife. High levels of selenium at Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge in the San Joaquin Valley caused migratory birds there to die in large numbers in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | September 24, 2008
While authorities have arrested a Costa Mesa pair they say have been passing off counterfeit $50 and $100 bills in recent months to local retailers, there is still one more person on the loose, officials said. Police are looking for 33-year-old Diana Gordon, the third defendant listed on a criminal complaint prosecutors filed with the court Monday. According to Costa Mesa detectives, the Huntington Beach resident was the third person involved in a small counterfeit operation running out of a pair of Costa Mesa homes where police say the trio printed money.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The Orange County Water District is suing industrial companies throughout the county for allegedly polluting the water supply, including one company in Costa Mesa and several in Santa Ana. By contaminating the groundwater basin with volatile organic chemicals and perchlorate, the companies are “posing a serious and substantial threat to the public health and environment,” the lawsuit reads. The district seeks to fine the companies the money it would cost to investigate claims of contamination and clean up wherever necessary.
LOCAL
By Joseph Serna | March 22, 2008
For one Newport Beach resident, there was nothing comforting about seeing state agricultural officials go in his backyard to spray pesticides. “They tell us it’s not dangerous, but I notice they wear hazmat suits,” Rick Taylor said. He claims the last time they sprayed the area, several dogs got sick, and now he’s worried about children Easter egg hunting Sunday. State Department of Food and Agriculture spokesman Steve Lyle said the suits are a safety precaution and that as soon as the chemicals dry, the plants should be safe to touch, especially by Sunday.
LOCAL
By Joseph Serna and Kelly Strodl | December 12, 2007
An Ensign Intermediate School seventh grader was arrested Tuesday after bringing a bomb on campus, police said. Newport Beach police took the 12-year-old boy into custody on suspicion of possession of an explosive device, Sgt. Evan Sailor said. The boy, whose name is being withheld because of his age, is being held in protective custody at Orange County Juvenile Hall. The suspect was caught with a plastic bottle that had a household powder and liquid inside and regular batteries, authorities said.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 18, 2007
School is quite literally a day at the beach for Costa Mesa High School teacher Cristen Rasmussen’s marine science class. Students spent time Wednesday at Little Corona Beach barefoot with their pants rolled up, wading through the chilly waters of Buck Gully, a small stream that empties into the Pacific. The class measured levels of dangerous chemicals in the water and learned how human actions affect the fragile beach ecosystem. There are squeals as one teen finds a gym sock in the creek, but the real shock comes when students find above-normal levels of phosphate in the water through chemical testing.
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