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NEWS
June 3, 2005
Elia Powers Craig Kausen still remembers the sound of film flipping through a 16-millimeter projector. He recalls the excitement of sitting on his grandfather's couch and watching his favorite cartoon characters come to life on a screen before they came to television screens nationwide. That's life when your grandfather is Chuck Jones, the well-known animator/director who was co-creator of Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck and sole creator of Marvin the Martian and Pepe Le Pew. Kausen said there was never a dull moment around the Jones household.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | August 8, 2009
Helena Modjeska, one of the most influential people in Orange County history, made a name for herself as a Shakespearean actress on the American stage after emigrating from Poland. Despite being a foreigner with an accent and an imperfect (albeit impressive) command of the English language, Modjeska won the hearts of the American public, performing the leading lady roles in Shakespeare’s tragedies. During her life she attracted the attention of the likes of playwright Oscar Wilde, who reprinted one of her poems at the beginning of his manuscripts, and novelist Willa Cather, who designed a character after the actress in one of her books.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | October 28, 2011
Families wanting to get into the Halloween mood without the spooks and spirits can head over to a fairytale-themed haunted house. The Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort & Marina is hosting its first family-friendly Haunted House that takes children through the story of "Snow White," complete with dwarfs and prizes throughout. "It's a story basically," said Executive Director Thomas Giulioni. "It's patterned off the story 'Snow White,' but we threw in some fun wrinkles. " The Haunted House is less haunted and more a show, with six scenes featuring more than 20 characters, Giulioni said.
NEWS
December 7, 1999
He created Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, Tweety Bird and Sylvester. Animator Chuck Jones dreamed up cartoon characters whose comic personalities are vivid American cultural icons. Jones, 87, now calls Corona del Mar home. He spent many of his youthful years shuttling between a rented Newport Beach home and Hollywood studios where he watched Charlie Chaplin. Jones learned his trade while handling the grunt work of washing up celluloid sheets for other animators.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Titus | May 1, 2008
Most of playwright Richard Greenberg’s projects at South Coast Repertory have made audiences care about the fate of Greenberg’s protagonists. However, with “The Injured Party,” his latest SCR offering, such is not the case. We’re looking at an avaricious clod and his unfaithful girlfriend, the two leading characters. Empathy has been lost. This is the primary reason why the project, replete with pregnant pauses under the direction of Trip Cullman, never really catches hold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Titus | June 11, 2009
Deep in the heart of Texas lies the state’s third-smallest town of Tuna, population 287, where the Lions Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies. Creators Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard established “Greater Tuna” back in 1981 and have been touring it and its three sequels around the country ever since, with Howard directing and Williams and Sears the only cast members, playing multiple roles. Finally, the elusive rights to the comedy have been released and the American Coast Theater Company has grabbed them.
NEWS
March 3, 2002
June Casagrande CORONA DEL MAR -- To one Corona del Mar resident, as to countless millions worldwide, Chuck Jones embodied the American spirit. And Laura Dietz, for one, says the city should recognize that spirit. Jones, a longtime Newport Beach resident, was the creative influence behind some of the never-say-die cartoon characters that illustrated to the world the tenacity and optimism that's synonymous with America. "The Roadrunner always seems to be able to avoid the disaster of the old coyote.
FEATURES
January 20, 2006
Characters whose destinies had previously been determined by playwrights and authors get to try their luck in the three-dimensional world in "The Further Adventures of Hedda Gabler," a world premiere play running through Jan. 29 at South Coast Repertory. The play was commissioned by South Coast Repertory and gained notoriety at last year's Pacific Playwright's Festival. Playwright Jeff Whitty earned critical acclaim for writing the book to the musical "Avenue Q." Director Bill Rauch said he was sold on the script at first glance.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
Paul Saitowitz Kra-koom! In a dank, tiny upstairs office just off Harbor Boulevard lurk the likes of Locklord, Optica, the Romancer, Netwerk, the Shrubling, Barbrazon and Kid Citrus, just to name a few. Pla-Chow! In that same office -- amid boxes and shelves full of comics -- a tall slender 32-year-old man sits at a desk armed with just a pencil, but without that pencil, none of the above-mentioned would have a prayer. The man is Todd Nauck, creator of the "WildGuard" comic, and the characters are part of the plethora of action heroes that make up the newest book published by Image Comics.
NEWS
October 17, 2003
Tom Titus It's fitting, actually, that Vanguard University chose to present "Spoon River Anthology" this close to Halloween, since all the characters in Charles Aidman's adaptation of Edgar Lee Masters' grim treatise on 19th-century life speak from beyond the grave. These "haunting" vignettes -- which, in effect, take the third act of Thornton Wilder's "Our Town" one step further -- paint a grim picture of life 150 years or so ago, and of marriage in particular.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Rhea Mahbubani | March 26, 2014
Ed Asner was in the throes of a custody battle when a psychologist examining the family remarked that his son seemed to lack empathy. Two weeks later, doctors at UCLA's Center for Autism Research and Treatment revealed that Charles, then 7 or 8, was on the autism spectrum. "I thought he was utterly charming, and I was in love with him," Asner, 84, said. "I was his slave, so I don't care what title you put on it. He was my boy and I would do whatever I had to do to treat him. " Today, his boy is 26 years old, and the Emmy recipient and former Screen Actors Guild president also has a grandson, Will, who is similarly afflicted, although to a different extent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rhea Mahbubani | February 6, 2014
Matthew Morrison is nothing like Will Schuester. The 35-year-old actor susses out people and their true intentions, while the William McKinley High School teacher on Fox's TV show "Glee" is a hopeless optimist. Both look for the good in people - or try to, at least - but Morrison is, by his own admission, a realist who quickly realizes when he's being steered wrongly. Come Feb. 13, the Broadway, film and television performer, who splits his time between Los Angeles and New York City, plans to be himself to the hilt.
SPORTS
September 25, 2013
Newport Harbor High girls' volleyball coach Dan Glenn and the school's athletic director, Mike Zimmerman, will be honored by the CIF Southern Section during its 10th annual Dr. Jim Staunton Champions for Character Awards Dinner in the Grand Ballroom on the RMS Queen Mary in Long Beach on Monday. Glenn, who has been at Newport Harbor since 1986, and Zimmerman, who became the Sailors' athletic director in 2009, are being praised for promoting the 16 principals of coaching, competing and teaching while pursuing victory with honor.
SPORTS
By David Carrillo Peñaloza | August 6, 2013
COSTA MESA - Women came dressed to the Orange County Fair as walking zombies and men as superheroes. Halloween is 13 weeks away, yet the fair gave them their own stage on Saturday. The characters showed up to compete, and not for best costume. They, along with seven dozen other adults dressed up, made their way down to the fairground's Action Sports Arena to avoid each other. That turned out to be impossible in a game of dodgeball played inside a 50x25-foot cage. The Ultimate Dodgeball Championships returned to the fair for the second straight year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rhea Mahbubani | June 22, 2013
Lily Tomlin's stint in mime lasted all of three weeks. It stands to reason - she likes words too much. "With your words, you are trying to impact the audience and make them feel all kinds of things," said Tomlin, 73, who tried miming when she was a fledgling performer in college. "Everybody can't see your face or your eyes, so the words, whether they're comedic or dramatic, have to carry the emotion. " Tomlin, who got her first taste of performing arts working at a New York talent agency during her sophomore year at Wayne State University, will take the stage at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts on Saturday.
SPORTS
By David Carrillo Peñaloza | June 7, 2013
COSTA MESA - On a night Fight Club OC celebrated its first card with professional women mixed martial arts and boxing bouts, a man who called himself "Repo Ric" tried to steal Thursday's show. He came dressed in as much glitter you see during a showgirls event in Las Vegas. Repo Ric wore several hats at the OC Fair & Event Center, from matchmaker to cut man to dancer. He almost stood out more than the boxers and MMA fighters in front of a sold-out crowd of 1,452. The event inside the Hangar featured nine bouts, two of them women fights, and the headline fighter's nickname was "Beauty Salon.
SPORTS
By Steve Virgen | April 30, 2013
The stereotype for athletes from a private school might sometimes be that they're privileged, or even pampered. The Mater Dei High School boys' water polo team shatters that stereotype in the short film "What It Takes. " The movie, which runs 14 minutes, 17 seconds, is about the Mater Dei team that went through an intense four-day U.S. Navy SEAL training last June amid its quest to capture its fifth straight CIF Southern Section championship. "What It Takes" will have its screening before "Touchdown Newport," the 60-minute documentary about the 1970 Newport Harbor High School football team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeremiah Dobruck | November 14, 2012
For first-time novelist A.G.S. Johnson, inspiration struck like lightning and immediately slowed to a crawl. "I was awakened one night, maybe 15 years ago, by this cocky female voice that was so intriguing to me that I jumped out of bed, literally, and I wrote as fast as I could," Johnson said, talking about the would-be foundation for her debut novel. "It was a couple of paragraphs of what this voice was saying … So I carried this stupid piece of writing around for probably a few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Peters | November 1, 2012
The chupacabra is just a legendary monster, but what if it weren't? That's what author Michael Hebler, owner of Newport Beach-based Night After Night Publications, asks readers in his new 300-page novel, "Night of the Chupacabra," the first in a five-part series. "It's such fascinating folklore, and it's only growing by leaps every day," Hebler said of the creature, whose name translates to "goat sucker" and was originally reported in the 1990s in Puerto Rico. The fictional Western-thriller, set in a post-Civil War backdrop, follows a father hunting the legendary beast to right the wrongs committed against his family, Hebler said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brittany Woolsey | October 11, 2012
Linda Gehringer said she enjoys creating roles in plays. Gehringer, an actress who lives in Laguna Beach, is a staple at South Coast Repertory, as well as a television actress on shows like "Touch" with Kiefer Sutherland and "Justified," she said. Now, she is starring as Mary Cain, a role she originated, in the repertory's upcoming production of "How to Write a New Book for the Bible" by Bill Cain. "Creating roles is just fun," she said. "That's one of the reasons I wanted to show the South Coast Repertory audience this play.
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