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Cape Horn

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By Tom Moulson | March 2, 2006
The idea was doubly exciting ? to cruise around South America from east to west, and to do so in the world's newest and largest ocean liner, the Queen Mary 2. Our great ship pulled out of New York on a freezing January night and slid past brightly lighted skyscrapers into the dark Atlantic. In the month ahead, my wife Tita and I would see and do much, transitioning from winter to summer and back. We would also participate in an extraordinary near-mutiny by the passengers. Two days later, while leaving the harbor in Fort Lauderdale, a mishap occurred that would preoccupy passengers, the captain and the Cunard line for the next several days.
NEWS
By Brad Avery, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 8, 2011
ABOARD THE ALASKA EAGLE, off Cape Horn — We are anchored in Martial Cove on Herschel Island, just eight miles north of Cape Horn. The wind is howling through the rigging at a steady 40 knots, with gusts up to 50 knots. The Alaska Eagle is sailing back and forth on her tandem anchors and heeling over in the gusts. Sometimes a blast shakes the mast and the whole boat vibrates. Even in this well-protected cove, 2-foot foot waves are rolling past us, and the lead-gray sea is covered with streaks of white.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
A former OCC president and avid sailor will present “A Visual History of Sailing Ships — and Those Adventurers Who Sailed in Them” in a lecture Thursday sponsored by the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum. Dave Grant, now president of the Orange Coast College Foundation, has sailed the South Pacific on his 28 sloop, sailed in the Sydney to Hobart and TransPac yacht races, and spent time at Cape Horn and South Georgia Island. The event, part of the museum’s Waterman Lecture Series, will be at from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Harborside Restaurant, 400 Main St. Tickets are $10 for members or $35 for non-members, who will receive a one-year membership.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kelly Strodl | April 6, 2007
Eight years ago David Grant rounded the dangerous Cape Horn in a yacht, and the experience awed him. Sailors sometimes report waves of 50- to 60-feet in the area, which is known as one of the windiest spots on earth, Grant said. "The waves down there are so huge," Grant said. "They break like the sound of an avalanche, like an avalanche of water. "It is unlike any other place on earth." But even though Grant has his own compelling account of Cape Horn, he still researched the cape from many other sources for his latest presentation at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum.
NEWS
April 21, 2009
They’ve faced the roughest seas, the coldest oceans and housed the most dangerous of shipmates. On Thursday, OCC’s Spring 2009 Visiting Scholar Series will present history professor and OCC President Emeritus David Grant for three hourlong lectures in the library about epic voyages in history. A reception will be at 5 p.m. in front of the library. The event starts at 12:45 p.m. with “The Extraordinary First Voyage of the Endeavour,” where Grant will take people through Capt.
NEWS
May 20, 2001
Young Chang Two Newport Beach friends cruised down and around South America, hitting big cities as well as tiny towns. During their 34 days aboard the Ryndam, a 720-foot long, 102-foot wide ship, they even experienced a storm that they considered a close second to the one in the film "The Perfect Storm." But Julie Wildermuth and Sally Talla found their trip exciting -- even the rocky parts. "It was my first time in South America, and it was just so different," said Wildermuth, a retired second-grade teacher in the Newport Mesa Unified School District.
NEWS
By PETER BUFFA | January 7, 2007
Big news from Chile. Not that we get a lot of news from Chile, but this is especially big. Newport Beach marathon-sailor Ken Barnes, who was stranded hundreds of miles off the southern tip of Chile on a solo round-the-world adventure, has been found and rescued safe and sound, pretty much. Barnes was doing something most of us think about now and then but seldom do — living the dream. In his case, the dream was not only sailing around the world alone but being the first to do it from the West Coast heading eastward.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
David C. Weber As mythical and enthralling as Shangri-la or Timbuktu, Patagonia lives with an engaging mystique. If you eat the calafate blueberry jam from the wild berries, it is said you shall return to Patagonia. I most assuredly hope I may -- for otherwise its famous western winds might have blown me away. For seven days I sailed with 120 other American tourists on the modern Chilean ship Mare Australis around historic parts of Tierra del Fuego, this vast barren island at the Patagonian, southernmost part of this hemisphere.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
Paula Godfrey Fourteen hours from LAX, plus a two-hour bus ride, found us ready to embark on the Royal Princess from Valparaiso, Chile, to Buenos Aires by sailing around Cape Horn. The itinerary showed seven days at sea and an extensive guided tour at every port -- at several of those we would have to drop anchor and take tenders to shore, which made it even more exciting. Our first stop was Puerto Montt, gateway to the Lake District. It lies in what is known as Forest Chile and comprises eight large lakes and scores of smaller ones nestled in rolling Andean foothills in a patchwork of forest and farmland.
NEWS
June 1, 2003
Dick Cannon This past March, my wife Diane and I visited Chile and spent three delightful weeks with our wonderful friends, the Silva Sante-Banez family (Koca, Chaco, Alberto, 30, Gonzalo, 20, Paula, 29, and her 5-year-old son Udo). This was our fifth trip over the years to visit this incredible country and immerse ourselves in the lives of this special family. Our relationship and bond began 15 years ago when our oldest son, Jeff -- then a junior at Corona del Mar High School -- was an American Field Service exchange student.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brad Avery, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 15, 2011
ABOARD THE ALASKA EAGLE, off South Georgia Island — With 30 knots of wind behind us, Alaska Eagle was flying along at 11 knots. Suddenly we found ourselves in fog with 200 feet of visibility. "Up for ice!" Peter called from the mast. As we quickly turned toward the wind, a golf cart-sized chunk of glacier slid by to starboard. In clear weather, the ice is easy to spot by our four lookouts, but the fog now demands more attention; hitting a ton or two of a bit of iceberg can do serious damage.
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NEWS
By Brad Avery, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 8, 2011
ABOARD THE ALASKA EAGLE, off Cape Horn — We are anchored in Martial Cove on Herschel Island, just eight miles north of Cape Horn. The wind is howling through the rigging at a steady 40 knots, with gusts up to 50 knots. The Alaska Eagle is sailing back and forth on her tandem anchors and heeling over in the gusts. Sometimes a blast shakes the mast and the whole boat vibrates. Even in this well-protected cove, 2-foot foot waves are rolling past us, and the lead-gray sea is covered with streaks of white.
NEWS
April 21, 2009
They’ve faced the roughest seas, the coldest oceans and housed the most dangerous of shipmates. On Thursday, OCC’s Spring 2009 Visiting Scholar Series will present history professor and OCC President Emeritus David Grant for three hourlong lectures in the library about epic voyages in history. A reception will be at 5 p.m. in front of the library. The event starts at 12:45 p.m. with “The Extraordinary First Voyage of the Endeavour,” where Grant will take people through Capt.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
A former OCC president and avid sailor will present “A Visual History of Sailing Ships — and Those Adventurers Who Sailed in Them” in a lecture Thursday sponsored by the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum. Dave Grant, now president of the Orange Coast College Foundation, has sailed the South Pacific on his 28 sloop, sailed in the Sydney to Hobart and TransPac yacht races, and spent time at Cape Horn and South Georgia Island. The event, part of the museum’s Waterman Lecture Series, will be at from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Harborside Restaurant, 400 Main St. Tickets are $10 for members or $35 for non-members, who will receive a one-year membership.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kelly Strodl | April 6, 2007
Eight years ago David Grant rounded the dangerous Cape Horn in a yacht, and the experience awed him. Sailors sometimes report waves of 50- to 60-feet in the area, which is known as one of the windiest spots on earth, Grant said. "The waves down there are so huge," Grant said. "They break like the sound of an avalanche, like an avalanche of water. "It is unlike any other place on earth." But even though Grant has his own compelling account of Cape Horn, he still researched the cape from many other sources for his latest presentation at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | January 11, 2007
The Newport Beach sailor stranded on his damaged boat off the coast of Chile was rescued shortly before 4 a.m. today and will return to the United States within a week, family members said. Ken Barnes, 47,  was attempting to sail around the world alone when he hit rough weather west of Chile. His boat capsized in a storm and he had been awaiting rescue since Tuesday, when he called his girlfriend and told her he was in trouble. Edward Smith, Barnes’ brother-in-law, said this morning the family first heard of the rescue from reporters and then confirmed it with U.S. and Chilean authorities, who have been helping to arrange Barnes’ rescue.
NEWS
By PETER BUFFA | January 7, 2007
Big news from Chile. Not that we get a lot of news from Chile, but this is especially big. Newport Beach marathon-sailor Ken Barnes, who was stranded hundreds of miles off the southern tip of Chile on a solo round-the-world adventure, has been found and rescued safe and sound, pretty much. Barnes was doing something most of us think about now and then but seldom do — living the dream. In his case, the dream was not only sailing around the world alone but being the first to do it from the West Coast heading eastward.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | January 5, 2007
The Newport Beach sailor stranded on his damaged boat off the coast of Chile was rescued shortly before 4 a.m. today and will return to the United States within a week, family members said. Ken Barnes, 47,  was attempting to sail around the world alone when he hit rough weather west of Chile. His boat capsized in a storm and he had been awaiting rescue since Tuesday, when he called his girlfriend and told her he was in trouble. Edward Smith, Barnes’ brother-in-law, said this morning the family first heard of the rescue from reporters and then confirmed it with U.S. and Chilean authorities, who have been helping to arrange Barnes’ rescue.
FEATURES
By Tom Moulson | March 2, 2006
The idea was doubly exciting ? to cruise around South America from east to west, and to do so in the world's newest and largest ocean liner, the Queen Mary 2. Our great ship pulled out of New York on a freezing January night and slid past brightly lighted skyscrapers into the dark Atlantic. In the month ahead, my wife Tita and I would see and do much, transitioning from winter to summer and back. We would also participate in an extraordinary near-mutiny by the passengers. Two days later, while leaving the harbor in Fort Lauderdale, a mishap occurred that would preoccupy passengers, the captain and the Cunard line for the next several days.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
David C. Weber As mythical and enthralling as Shangri-la or Timbuktu, Patagonia lives with an engaging mystique. If you eat the calafate blueberry jam from the wild berries, it is said you shall return to Patagonia. I most assuredly hope I may -- for otherwise its famous western winds might have blown me away. For seven days I sailed with 120 other American tourists on the modern Chilean ship Mare Australis around historic parts of Tierra del Fuego, this vast barren island at the Patagonian, southernmost part of this hemisphere.
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