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California Coastal Commission

NEWS
September 17, 2006
Among the questions that have come up during Newport Beach City Council candidates forums is one that seems to be on the minds of many Newport residents, especially those fortunate enough to live near the beaches: How should the city handle out-of-town parking? According to a chorus of people, visitors to town are violating the city's 10 p.m. beach curfew, leaving trash strewn on city streets, making noise in the early hours of the morning and even vandalizing property. The most benign violators are simply leaving their cars parked on Balboa Island while they spend weekends on Catalina Island.
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FEATURES
July 24, 2006
Costa Mesa should get beachfront land Resolving the remaining islands of unincorporated lands to be incorporated into Newport Beach and Costa Mesa need not be a bitter tug-of-war or "winner take all," rather it should be settled with civility, fairness and sound judgment. Western Santa Ana Heights is slated to be incorporated into Newport Beach to join its Eastern Santa Ana Heights neighbors. All sides agree on this. But what of the remaining areas: the area south of Santa Ana Heights and Mesa Drive, Banning Ranch and the Santa Ana Country Club?
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | May 12, 2006
The city of Newport Beach has started cracking down on the owners 138 beachfront properties whose patios, lawns and landscaping may be encroaching on public property. In letters sent Wednesday, the city informed homeowners they must either remove any plants or structures that extend past their property lines or apply for an encroachment permit from the California Coastal Commission. Most homeowners have between five and 30 days to respond to the letters, depending on the type of encroachment.
NEWS
By By Alicia Robinson | November 30, 2005
Spurred by flattened sand dune, Newport leader wants city to address punishing future offenders. The California Coastal Commission plans to penalize five West Newport property owners for allegedly removing a sand dune, but in the future the city of Newport Beach could be meting out punishment for environmental crimes on its shores. Newport Beach Mayor John Heffernan wants the City Council to look at creating penalties for messing with coastal resources and including them in the local coastal plan the city is now writing.
NEWS
By By Andrew Edwards | November 3, 2005
U.S. Supreme Court declines to take on challenge to Coastal Commission, but fight's not over yet.The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday that it will not hear arguments in a legal case about an artificial reef built years ago in the waters near Newport Beach. In June, the California Supreme Court ruled against the Newport Beach-based Marine Forests Society when it determined the California Coastal Commission -- which the society alleged to be unconstitutional -- is a legal body.
FEATURES
October 18, 2005
Since the time of the ancient Phoenicians and Greeks, everyone has wanted to use land by the sea. The attraction was beauty, recreation and more. A shoreline lot was of enormous commercial value. Shipbuilders, merchants, bankers and assorted tradesmen realized the economic advantage of being where goods arrived and left on a daily basis. Ports were a mecca of industrial activity. After lengthy and often raucous debate, rather than shutting out any of the desirable uses and users of the coast, laws were enacted that gave ownership of the coastal areas to all the people.
NEWS
By: Alicia Robinson | October 14, 2005
The city of Newport Beach on Thursday overcame one huge hurdle in creating a state-required local coastal plan, but the work isn't over yet. The California Coastal Commission unanimously approved the land-use portion of Newport Beach's local coastal plan at a Thursday meeting in San Diego. Environmentalists cheered the decision because the commission agreed with its staff rather than the city on two disputed items -- how to define wetlands and how far to set back buildings from coastal bluffs.
NEWS
By: Alicia Robinson | October 11, 2005
When the California Coastal Commission meets Thursday, it will discuss a long-overdue land-use plan for coastal Newport Beach, but city and coastal commission staff members are still at odds on two key issues. The land-use plan is half of a state-required local coastal plan the city has been working on since 2001. It describes what kinds of development can occur and what resources need to be protected in the city's coastal zone. City officials have been frustrated by how long it's taken the commission to respond to their proposals for the plan, particularly since Newport Beach has racked up $1,000 a month in fines -- now totaling about $26,000 -- since missing a July 2003 deadline to have a plan in place.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 19, 2005
The California Coastal Commission has lifted a deadline for Newport Beach officials to report on a destroyed West Newport sand dune. The commission had asked city officials to report the results of an inquiry into the dune's disappearance by Thursday. Newport Beach Police are still investigating the case, but since coastal commission officials expect police to find the responsible party, the deadline was removed. "They made some headway, so the deadline's been lifted," said Andrew Willis, district enforcement analyst for the commission.
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