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NEWS
By Candice Baker | November 4, 2009
Rat-powered robotics are taking central stage at UC Irvine — not Disneyland — because of a robot powered by rodent brain impulses that is teaching researchers about uncertainty in the face of change. The robot is being used in a $1.6-million joint study between UCI and UC San Diego; researchers hope to learn about the brain’s role in decision making and attention at the neuron level. “Little is known about the areas of the brain involved in making decisions when faced with uncertainty,” Jeffrey Krichmar, a UCI cognitive scientist and one of the study’s lead researchers, said in a release.
NEWS
By: FLO MARTIN | September 9, 2005
TV or not TV? Public television, such as our own KOCE-TV, isn't worth the trouble, you say? The children's shows on public television are chock-full of ads, you say? We can find better viewing material on cable channels, such as the Discovery Channel, the History Channel, or A&E, you say? Seeing that the price of local cable services ranges from $50 to more than $110 a month, I seriously doubt that many folks, especially families with lots of kids, actually watch those channels.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | September 2, 2006
A study by UC Irvine researchers could prove that stress is even more harmful to the human body than previously thought — specifically to the brain. The researchers, led by Frank LaFerla, discovered a hormonal connection between stress and Alzheimer's disease. The study shows that increased levels of stress increases acceleration of the disease through the brain. UCI researchers Kim Green and Lauren Billings worked to solve the connection between stress and Alzheimer's using a crew of genetically altered mice.
NEWS
January 17, 2008
UCI scientists say they have found a gene in charge of creating higher functioning brain cells that could lead to stem cell therapies for patients with brain injuries or who have suffered from a stroke or have Alzheimer’s. The gene, Lhx2, generates cells in the cerebral cortex, the area of the brain responsible for language, decision-making and vision. UCI researcher Edwin Monuki, doctoral student Karla Hirokawa, and their colleagues were responsible for the breakthrough, school officials said.
NEWS
March 3, 2009
The National Institutes of Health have awarded two UCI neuroscientists a $2-million grant to study an area of the brain associated with language, university officials announced Tuesday. Cognitive sciences professors Gregory Hickock and Kourish Saberi will use the five-year grant to study the overall function of the planum temporale, a part of the brain in the left and right hemispheres in the auditory cortex. The scientists hope their study could lead to clinical research and treatment of developmental and psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.
NEWS
November 13, 2009
A new study from UC Irvine suggests that human embryonic stem cells could improve healthy tissue damaged during radiation treatment for brain tumors. Researchers treated rats with radiation, then transplanted stem cells into some of them. They found that the rats that received the stem cells had their learning and memory restored to normal levels within four months after receiving radiotherapy. The rats that didn?t receive stem cells saw a greater than 50% drop in brain function.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | August 8, 2009
Is the brain the No. 1 food source for zombies? Does it taste like chicken? Who knows? Well, maybe Weird Al Yankovic. In a 15-minute window to what learning might be like if Weird Al were a professor, kids and adults at the Orange County Fair have been bombarded with 3-D images and facts of the brain through the celebrity’s trademark-styled songs. The tent housing Weird Al’s manic lesson on the brain and all it can do looks more like the entrance to a haunted house or maze than a doorway into a science lesson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brianna Bailey | May 8, 2010
Some four months after finishing his last round of chemotherapy, 6-year-old Julian Dunn has almost an inch of newly grown hair on his head. A year and a half after doctors found a golf-ball sized tumor in Julian’s brain, his parents say life is finally returning to normal at their Newport Beach household. The hearth in the Dunn’s living room is lined with Julian’s extensive collection of LEGO spaceships and cars. Julian would spend hours building with LEGOS while undergoing 55 weeks of radiation and chemotherapy treatments that left him weak and nauseous.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | October 2, 2012
A UC Irvine professor, along with a team of researchers, discovered that a marijuana-like substance naturally released in the brain can treat symptoms of one type of autism, the university recently announced. Cannabinoids released in the brains of mice that had fragile x syndrome, one of the most common causes of genetically defined autism, treated their autistic behavior within hours of dosage, said Daniele Piomelli, a UCI professor of anatomy and neurobiology and one of the study's authors.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | November 12, 2008
Costa Mesa police and medical personnel are responsible for the death of a Huntington Beach man who died days after collapsing while in custody last year, according to a lawsuit to be served to city officials in the coming days, the lawyer representing the man’s mother said Tuesday. At about 3:20 p.m., Sept. 1, 2007, Costa Mesa police pulled over 45-year-old Donald Kurtz because he was driving erratically and failed a field sobriety test, authorities said days after the arrest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Leigh Steinberg | October 26, 2013
I love the game of football. It is America's passion for a reason. Athletes learn invaluable life lessons from their participation in football at whatever level they participate. The ability to stay self-disciplined, put hard work ahead of immediate gratification, master a complex playbook, work within a team concept and elevate levels of performance in critical situations are skills transferable to success in any non-football endeavor. The sport models those values every day in a way that inspires young people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By B.W. Cook | September 5, 2013
It is arguably the grandest party of the summer on the Orange Coast. Oceana's Sea Change event unfolded Aug. 18 at the spectacular Mediterranean estate of Karen and Bruce Cahill , attracting a chic crowd of some 500 residents dedicated to ocean conservation. The al fresco evening welcomed entertainer Sheryl Crow performing for her enthusiastic audience. Guests felt like they were being entertained up close and personal in their home by a superstar. The celebrity contingent was a tour de force element of the summer party.
SPORTS
By Leigh Steinberg | June 23, 2013
Since I became alarmed some 30 years ago about the lack of certainty for long-term consequences caused by concussions suffered by my superstar NFL clients, the news has gotten progressively more discouraging. Breakthroughs in brain research and extensive testing of retired athletes has made it clear that our society is about to witness an epidemic of symptoms and damage in athletes in a variety of sports. Training techniques have created a new breed of robo-athletes able to run more quickly at greater size with unprecedented power.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | May 24, 2013
SPORTS
By Leigh Steinberg | May 18, 2013
A new health epidemic looms on the horizon like a ticking time bomb. It is the spectre of cumulative brain damage suffered from repetitive sub-concussive hits to the head in football and other sports. A concussion does not necessitate being knocked out cold. It is a blow to the head or body creating a change in brain function. Research is now showing that damage is occurring in regular action to most football athletes on most plays. And none of it is diagnosed or charted. The simple act of an offensive lineman hitting a defensive lineman to start a play produces sub-concussive damage to both players.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Re. "He heard what sounded like a voice," (April 5): Kudos to reporter Lauren Williams for describing something that is rarely done well: how the mind of a slide-rule-carrying, pocket-protector type of person works. As someone of that persuasion, I thoroughly enjoyed her spot-on description of how Costa Mesa resident John Sendrey methodically went about optimizing his chances of finding the missing hiker, Kyndall Jack. Williams tells us that Sendrey researched what had already been done so he wouldn't have to reinvent the wheel.
SPORTS
March 9, 2013
In previous columns, I suggested that the increased size, speed and strength of today's NFL players are creating a dramatically more damaging set of collisions. We have known for years of the devastation these collisions cause on every joint in the human body. It has become crystal clear that the effects of blows to the head affect emotions, memory, reasoning — what it means to be human — in frightening ways. The ticking time bomb and undiagnosed health epidemic that is developing consists of the cumulative effects of millions of sub-concussive blows that are rarely recognized or treated.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | February 1, 2013
Colt Munchoff was a former athlete who felt invincible until a childhood trophy smashed into the back of his head, reducing him to nearly nothing. His punt, pass and kick award flew out of a box in the back seat of Munchoff's car when it was rear-ended on the freeway just outside La Jolla. Responders took him to the hospital, where he was in a coma for 12 days. When he came to, he couldn't walk, talk, eat or drink. His 23-year-old body was confined to a wheelchair, his invulnerable "Teflon days" seemingly done.
SPORTS
By Leigh Steinberg | October 20, 2012
Although I have written on the dangers of concussions in this space before, the consequences are so dire that it is worth revisiting the subject for my friends in Newport-Mesa. Although the National Football League is the focus of most media coverage, this is a problem that faces millions of athletes who compete at all levels of collision sports. It also affects the victims of millions of annual accidents. It is the undiagnosed health epidemic of our time, a ticking time bomb. Many of the long-term symptoms may not show up for years.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | October 2, 2012
A UC Irvine professor, along with a team of researchers, discovered that a marijuana-like substance naturally released in the brain can treat symptoms of one type of autism, the university recently announced. Cannabinoids released in the brains of mice that had fragile x syndrome, one of the most common causes of genetically defined autism, treated their autistic behavior within hours of dosage, said Daniele Piomelli, a UCI professor of anatomy and neurobiology and one of the study's authors.
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