Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsBrad Avery
IN THE NEWS

Brad Avery

NEWS
By Brad Avery, Special to the Daily Pilot | January 7, 2014
I took a last stroll around the deck of Alaska Eagle today. Every step, every hand rail felt familiar, as they do after finishing a long voyage. I was 29 when we first took students aboard from the Orange Coast College docks in October 1982. Now, 31 years later, Alaska Eagle is flying the Dutch flag once again, and in a few days will be loaded onto a ship in Los Angeles bound for Rotterdam. At a certain point in life you begin to realize that letting go is a skill, and happiness is related to how good you are at it. I have some work to do. What exactly am I letting go of?
Advertisement
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Brad Avery Editor's Note: This the final in a five-part series on OCC's Alaska Eagle's 2,300-mile journey in the Southern Hemisphere. Alaska Eagle is anchored at Tonga Roadstead in Tasman Bay, after a rough 350-mile sail from Milford Sound. Even though warmed up by the size and beauty of Dusky and Doubtful sounds, the crew was still unprepared for the narrow steep Fjord of Milford, with its granite walls reaching thousands of feet straight up. This stunning sound is 8 miles long by a half mile wide, but its height makes it huge.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | January 20, 2007
The Orange Coast College Foundation will begin the process of putting Rabbit Island up for sale, but will give students and faculty a chance to seek alternate methods of funding for the British Columbian property. At the foundation's board meeting Thursday, several members described the island as a drain on OCC's financial resources and said they were keen on regaining the money they had invested in it. A core group of students and faculty, however, have asked the foundation to hold on to Rabbit Island, calling it a valuable academic resource.
NEWS
May 29, 2004
Lolita Harper It is the 20th anniversary of the Alaska Eagle's training voyages and the crew is marking the occasion Saturday by embarking on a first leg that is twice as far as any nonstop trip it has ever sailed. The Orange Coast College School of Sailing leaves on another memorable voyage at 11:30 a.m. today that will include trips to Easter Island, Pitcarin, the Marquesas, Tuamotus, Tahiti, Moorea, Bora Bora, Fanning Island and Hawaii. "We want our students to find out what life on the long passage is all about," sailing school spokesman Brad Avery said.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 15, 2006
Orange Coast College students and faculty want the school's foundation to find a way to retain Rabbit Island, a British Columbian island the foundation might sell to raise money for the college's sailing school. Since 2003, the college used the island for a number of academic courses, but the foundation has struggled to pay for its maintenance. The island could fetch up to $1.25 million to $1.75 million, Foundation President Doug Bennett said. At Monday's OCC student government meeting, the board of trustees voted unanimously to request the foundation wait 60 days before making a decision on Rabbit Island so college officials can seek other ways to save money on the island's maintenance.
NEWS
February 25, 2005
Lindsay Sandham Although the rains this week were not as costly and continual as the storms Southern California saw last month, they still had a negative effect on many local businesses that rely on the sea for their livelihood. "This time of year, obviously it's very slow down here, and when the rain hits, it makes it kind of miserable for everybody," said Bob Black, president of Catalina Passenger Service and vice president of Balboa Pavilion Company in Balboa Village.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
Christine Carrillo Many people dream of one day owning an island of their very own. An island where they can seek refuge from the hectic world they find themselves in every day. Rarely, does anyone ever find themselves the recipients of such a gift. But last month, the college did. Orange Coast College received Rabbit Island, a 36-acre British Columbia island worth about $750,000, school officials announced Tuesday. The donation, which came from Southern California yachtsman Henry Wheeler, was the second of two major gifts the college received in January.
FEATURES
By Lauren Vane | March 10, 2006
Pyewacket, considered by many professional sailors to be the most technical and powerful racing yacht in the world, is now part of the educational toolbox for the students of the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship. The $7-million boat arrived at its new home in Newport Harbor last week. Since being donated to OCC by Roy Disney in July, it's been at a Marina del Ray shipyard undergoing modifications to make it easier to handle and a better fit for Newport Harbor.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | February 26, 2010
Gone are the days of sharing showers, restrooms and other facilities. Gone are the days of the men’s and women’s crew teams having to practice their rowing at the Newport Aquatic Center. The Orange Coast College’s Sailing and Seamanship Center in Newport Beach has received a serious face lift. Nearly $4 million went into a series of improvements that were officially dedicated Thursday at the center, which is the only one of its kind among community colleges nationwide.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|