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Brad Avery

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NEWS
January 5, 2000
A 65-foot sailing vessel belonging to OCC finished in the top third of an annual boating race in Australia. The Alaska Eagle finished 24th out of 80 boats in the Telstra Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, which was staged between Christmas and New Year's Day. Only 50 yachts finished the 630-nautical-mile race. The rugged race touted by Australians as "The Sail of the Century" claimed six lives in 1998. No one was injured this time, but the sailing crews did have their share of problems.
NEWS
May 22, 2005
Many of us don't know much about boats, but we can certainly recognize a generous gift when it sails into the harbor. Such is the case with the Kialoa III, an 80-foot, world-class racing boat recently donated to Orange Coast College's School of Sailing and Seamanship. Kialoa III's owner, Jim Kilroy of Marina del Rey, said he chose the college because it is close to his home and because of the quality of its sailing program. That must be quite a program.
NEWS
August 24, 2000
Amy R. Spurgeon NEWPORT BEACH -- Santa Claus paid an early visit to Orange Coast College's School of Sailing and Seamanship this year with the donation of Black Irish, a 41-foot 1966 Hinckley luxury sloop. Instead of a red suit and black boots, this Santa -- also known as Ed Cox -- dons Polo shirts, khakis and loafers. "I've had the boat for 16 years. I know the program and think it will be a good home for the boat," Cox said while proudly patting the recently varnished wood exterior of the boat.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | August 21, 2012
A day on the job for Richard and Sheri Crowe might include climbing a smoke-spewing volcano, watching Antarctic icebergs cave in, or guiding student sailors through rough seas to remote destinations. But now, after 30 years as captains of the Alaska Eagle, the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship's 65-foot training vessel, the Crowes have retired. "It was way easier to say, 'Hey, I'm ready to retire,' than to say, 'I'm ready to stop running this boat,'" Sheri, 52, said while onboard the school's flagship sailboat in Newport Harbor on Monday morning.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 15, 2006
Orange Coast College’s faculty senate voted unanimously Tuesday to ask the school’s foundation to delay a decision regarding the sale of Rabbit Island, a property in British Columbia that some on campus are calling a drain on resources. On Thursday, the OCC Foundation plans to consider putting the island up for sale to raise money for its School of Sailing and Seamanship. Earlier this week, the student board of trustees voted to ask that the foundation wait 60 days before ruling on Rabbit Island, so that others in the community could seek alternative ways of paying for its maintenance.
NEWS
April 16, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- Right around now, Brad Avery's probably somewhere off the Oregon coast. Last Thursday, the director of Orange Coast College's School of Sailing and Seamanship headed up to Vancouver Island to bring his motor boat back to Newport Beach. And last Tuesday, as he sat in his new office that overlooks Newport Harbor, the passionate sailor said there's nothing wrong with letting the boat do most of the work once in a while.
NEWS
January 30, 2003
Christine Carrillo Orange Coast College's School of Sailing and Seamanship announced Wednesday that it has received its largest donation ever in the form of an 88-foot, $2-million motor yacht. ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. founder Milan Panic, a former Yugoslavian president, donated the yacht, which served as his private vessel for 20 years. The donation will allow the school to adopt a new noncredit program geared toward vocational instruction. "We don't see it as a luxury yacht.
FEATURES
By Joseph Serna | December 17, 2009
His retirement from sailing marked the opening of a new opportunity for Orange Coast College students. When Roy E. Disney handed over his 86-foot yacht, the Pyewacket, as a donation to OCC’s Sailing and Seamanship program in April 2006, he gave new sailors a chance to raise their skill level, others a shot at the most complex boat around, and some an opportunity they’d never have again. “There’s just many, many techniques to sailing a big powerful boat like that correctly,” said Brad Avery, director of OCC’s marine programs.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | March 1, 2007
Author and radio personality Laura Schlessinger has given a boat to the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship, marking the latest in a series of high-profile donations to the school in recent years. Schlessinger, known to listeners as "Dr. Laura," delivered her vessel to the sailing school on Friday. She bought the 58-foot sailboat in 2004, she said, but had grown more interested in racing by the time construction work on the boat was finished. "It was my baby," Schlessinger said.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 7, 2014
The Alaska Eagle has proudly displayed the Orange Coast College flag on its stern for 32 years and more than 290,000 miles. But Tuesday morning, as crew members worked to disassemble the 90-foot mast, OCC's flag had been replaced with the red, white and blue-striped symbol of the Netherlands. The change represents the School of Sailing & Seamanship's farewell to the 65-foot sloop. The college in Costa Mesa sold the Alaska Eagle earlier this month to Diederik Nolten, a Dutch sailor and businessman, for $350,000.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | August 21, 2012
A day on the job for Richard and Sheri Crowe might include climbing a smoke-spewing volcano, watching Antarctic icebergs cave in, or guiding student sailors through rough seas to remote destinations. But now, after 30 years as captains of the Alaska Eagle, the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship's 65-foot training vessel, the Crowes have retired. "It was way easier to say, 'Hey, I'm ready to retire,' than to say, 'I'm ready to stop running this boat,'" Sheri, 52, said while onboard the school's flagship sailboat in Newport Harbor on Monday morning.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | May 1, 2012
A GPS device from the doomed racing boat Aegean struck a jagged island, an online tracking system shows. The sailing community was buzzing with the news Tuesday, as racers emailed a link to Spot, a personal satellite tracking company, and speculated anew about the original theory of the accident. Up to now, many thought that the 37-foot Aegean was struck by a larger commercial vessel, such as a tanker or freighter. The accident claimed four sailors' lives Saturday during the annual Newport-to-Ensenada race.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | December 8, 2011
COSTA MESA — A longtime Newport Beach resident has donated a $2-million yacht to Orange Coast College, the largest donation of its kind to the campus. Jerry Barto and his family gave their 92-foot luxury vessel, the Nordic Star, to the college's Professional Mariner Program to help students train for a career in the industry. "All three of my kids went to OCC, so this was a family decision," Barto said in a prepared statement. "We wanted to help students and this great program, so it was an easy decision to make.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | November 30, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — While the City Council reformed aspects of its harbor mooring management on Nov. 23, it left intact one of the practices identified by a grand jury critical of the process. Under the new rules, two yacht clubs will still be able to lease some of the public moorings from the city and distribute them among members. The practice, which has been in place for generations, restricts the public's access to about 20% of the 800 offshore moorings (those in the depths of the harbor as opposed to on the shore)
FEATURES
By Joseph Serna | December 17, 2009
His retirement from sailing marked the opening of a new opportunity for Orange Coast College students. When Roy E. Disney handed over his 86-foot yacht, the Pyewacket, as a donation to OCC’s Sailing and Seamanship program in April 2006, he gave new sailors a chance to raise their skill level, others a shot at the most complex boat around, and some an opportunity they’d never have again. “There’s just many, many techniques to sailing a big powerful boat like that correctly,” said Brad Avery, director of OCC’s marine programs.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | August 12, 2008
The OCC School of Sailing and Seamanship in Newport Beach recently received a new addition to its prestigious fleet of ships, which the center’s director called “by far the best power boat” that it owns. Donated by retired architect Gared Smith, who made his living designing numerous apartment buildings in the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, the vessel is valued at $1 million. “It’s one of the nicest gifts we’ve ever received,” said Brad Avery, director of the school.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | August 11, 2008
A pirate-clad ukulele player and a septuagenarian celestial navigation buff sit down at a dinner table. What do they talk about? How do they pass an entire night together? It’s almost a rhetorical question given the improbability of this pairing, but about a dozen people now know the answer thanks to a transpacific sailing expedition that recently ended in Newport Beach. The Alaska Eagle, a 65-foot aluminum sailboat that just returned from a yearlong, 20,000-mile trip to New Zealand and back, was staffed by a motley crew of sailors, and they didn’t just eat one meal together.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | March 1, 2007
Author and radio personality Laura Schlessinger has given a boat to the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship, marking the latest in a series of high-profile donations to the school in recent years. Schlessinger, known to listeners as "Dr. Laura," delivered her vessel to the sailing school on Friday. She bought the 58-foot sailboat in 2004, she said, but had grown more interested in racing by the time construction work on the boat was finished. "It was my baby," Schlessinger said.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 16, 2006
Orange Coast College’s faculty senate voted unanimously Tuesday to ask the school’s foundation to delay a decision regarding the sale of Rabbit Island, a property in British Columbia that some on campus are calling a drain on resources. On Thursday, the OCC Foundation plans to consider putting the island up for sale to raise money for its School of Sailing and Seamanship. Earlier this week, the student board of trustees voted to ask that the foundation wait 60 days before ruling on Rabbit Island, so that others in the community could seek alternative ways of paying for its maintenance.
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