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NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | May 3, 2006
To most people, the effect of Monday's pro-immigrant boycott on the Newport-Mesa economy was probably small. But for Ivan Calderon, it meant losing about $18,000. As thousands rallied in Los Angeles and Santa Ana to support immigrant rights, it was mainly business as usual in Costa Mesa and Newport Beach. About 40 businesses closed, and among them were Calderon's four Taco Mesa restaurants around Orange County and a Taco Rosa in Newport Beach. Chamber of commerce officials in both cities said Tuesday they hadn't heard of any major disruptions in business.
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NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | May 2, 2006
A few more dirty cars than usual may have been cruising around Newport-Mesa on Monday, and those with a hankering for Mexican food may have had to settle for something else. But otherwise the effects of the national "day without immigrants" were muted here, with the region's major demonstration taking place in Los Angeles, and Santa Ana playing host to Orange County's biggest rallies. Congress is debating whether to crack down on illegal immigrants and the businesses that hire them, or to offer a guest worker program to fill "jobs Americans won't do" ?
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | May 1, 2006
Today may be a quiet day in Costa Mesa, with a number of Westside businesses expected to close to observe the "day of action" supporting immigrant rights and the major Orange County rally planned for neighboring Santa Ana. Federal legislators so far have not been able to agree on whether immigration policy should allow illegal immigrants a chance to stay, or try to discourage the undocumented from coming by increasing criminal penalties for...
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | April 2, 2006
Immigrant-rights activists have rejected plans for an economic boycott of Costa Mesa businesses. A group of local labor unions and Latino activists in February called for a boycott to begin Saturday if the Costa Mesa City Council did not abandon its plan to train police for immigration enforcement. The council has not reversed its decision, but Santa Ana activist Nativo Lopez ? who led the group threatening the boycott ? issued a written statement at Saturday's protest rally in Costa Mesa canceling the boycott.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | March 8, 2006
A proposed boycott of Costa Mesa businesses seems to be fizzling out before it even begins, as local business owners are distancing themselves from the movement and expressing their disagreement with city policies in other ways. The City Council on December voted, 3-2, to give police federal training to check the immigration status of people arrested on suspicion of felonies. If warranted, suspects could then be turned over to federal immigration authorities. In February, a group of local labor unions and Latino advocacy groups that oppose Costa Mesa's immigration enforcement plan called for a boycott of city businesses and civil disobedience by residents.
FEATURES
March 4, 2006
Mirna Burciaga's thinly veiled attempt to backpedal from her alliance with the business boycott and other divisive tactics is pathetic. She should at least stand with them and not try to mollify her position, with statements like, "I have no power," and, "I am only one voice." She has pursued a prominent leadership role that is clearly aligned with the Tonantzin Collective's social and political objectives in Costa Mesa. Burciaga made her position very clear. She supported the business boycott intended to put financial hardship on businesses in Costa Mesa, and said she would display a sign in her restaurant's window supporting the boycott.
NEWS
By STEVE SMITH | February 15, 2006
In 1970, you could fly from Los Angeles to San Francisco for $19. The airline was Pacific Southwest, and flights left every hour on the hour until 1 a.m. The 1 a.m. flights were more party than travel. I took one of those 1 a.m. flights in 1970 at the age of 15. Arriving in San Francisco an hour later, I took a shuttle to a stop near Market Street, one the city's main thoroughfares. For about 20 minutes I wandered down Market Street past the homeless, the hookers and the high, looking for a specific address.
FEATURES
By BYRON DE ARAKAL | February 12, 2006
Latino-civil-rights activist Nativo Lopez swept into Costa Mesa on Feb. 2, threatening to hold the city's merchants hostage to a boycott should they refuse to disavow Costa Mesa's pending immigration enforcement plan. Multiple television news outlets swarmed to videotape and broadcast Lopez's warning, including Noticias 62, which stirred up controversy last year when it declared Los Angeles to be a part of Mexico on an L.A. billboard. That same day remnant goons of Saddam Hussein's Baathist Party -- reported to be the captors of Christian Science Monitor reporter Jill Carroll -- videotaped another heartbreaking plea from the young journalist, who begged for U.S. action to win her release.
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