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NEWS
By Adolfo Flores and Samantha Schaefer | January 27, 2014
On the heels of preliminary  findings in an audit  of the Great Park that raised questions about the $200-million project's finances, Irvine may start issuing subpoenas to get some answers. The City Council is set to vote on a resolution Tuesday that would allow its attorneys to subpoena people and documents to help auditors continue their review - at a cost of $400,000, according to the Los Angeles Times . During the course of their investigation, auditors said that they were “precluded from further analysis” and that several key players refused to speak with them.
NEWS
By Bob Rush | February 4, 2012
For years, the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce has been a willing recipient of taxpayer dollars, via city "waived permit fees. " At expense to other community uses for the funds, the city (from its General Fund) forgave thousands of dollars in un-reimbursed city services provided to profit-oriented chamber events, thereby "freeing up" chamber operating funds for "other" uses. In 2009 alone, the chamber had more than $55,000 costs waived. As documented in tax returns, the chamber generally runs its operation at a loss, yet continues donating to its own Political Action Committee (PAC)
NEWS
By Paloma Esquivel | January 30, 2014
Civic leaders in Irvine have authorized the use of subpoenas to help auditors delve deeper into an investigation of the financial management of the Orange County Great Park. The City Council voted 3-2 Tuesday to move forward with a forensic audit after a preliminary report raised questions about spending, contracts and oversight of the 1,300-park, which has been in the works for more than a decade. Council members Larry Agran and Beth Krom, who helped steward the project from its beginnings until they lost the council majority in the city's 2012 elections, denounced the  decision, which Krom called a “witch hunt.” Great Park: Where did all the money go?
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 7, 2014
It was a lavish evening at the posh Center Club, a Gatsby-themed affair 10 months in the making. The private, South Coast Metro venue was replete with flappers, generous silent-auction gift baskets, live music, a faux casino and hors d'oeuvres. Nearly 200 people attended the party last October, hoping it would be a much-needed fundraising boost for the Costa Mesa Senior Center. It wasn't. The party, the center's first fundraiser in eight years, cost nearly $45,000 and raised some $43,000 - a net loss of about $2,000.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | August 20, 2012
Newport Beach city officials recently rejected a request from a group of commercial marina owners who wish to audit the city's Tidelands Fund. Marina owners contend that the tidelands finances are mixed up with those of general city services, and they shouldn't pay higher rent until the fund is inspected. City officials have sought to wring more money out of mooring holders, businesses and other harbor stakeholders in recent years, as the city invests millions in dredging and other harbor projects.
NEWS
By Jenny Stockdale, Special to the Daily Pilot | April 18, 2012
The following is from the April 17 Costa Mesa City Council meeting. * Bernard Street 113-unit residential development to be constructed Upholding the Planning Commission's recommendations, the council approved 5 to 0 two measures that will allow construction of a 7.79-acre, 113-unit housing development project at 421Bernard St., near Triangle Square. The council approved both an addendum to the project's environmental impact report and an amendment to the project's master plan.
NEWS
From staff reports | February 28, 2014
Rutan & Tucker LLP has a new managing partner, Steve Nichols. Nichols joined what is now Orange County's largest full-service law firm in 1981. His specialties are in construction and business law as well as litigation, according to a news release from the Costa Mesa-based firm. Before becoming managing partner, he served on Rutan's executive committee for five years. * Growers Ranch to mark 45 years Growers Ranch , which sells fresh produce at 2016 Newport Blvd., plans to host a 45th anniversary celebration from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 22. The event will feature "giveaways, raffles, tastings" and "good 'ol fashion family fun," according to the store's website.
NEWS
By Novell Hendrickson | October 29, 2012
Re. " Measure EE addresses lawsuits, red lights (Oct. 14): The above-referenced article starts out with, "Those are the highlights in an otherwise dry legal document that asks voters to make 38 changes to the 58- year-old city charter. " And then, it states, "Deciding the fate of 38 constitutional amendments sounds like a big deal. " Well, it is a big deal, for the City Council and staff to virtually rewrite our charter in five one-and-one-half hour charter update committee working meetings, in particular since extensive modifications were made to the charter just two years ago. About three-fourths of the article consisted of dialogue with the proponents discussing the issues without an opportunity for equal response from the opponents.
NEWS
By Julie Cart | January 6, 2014
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's inspector general will investigate a federal agency whose mission is to exterminate birds, coyotes, mountain lions and other animals that threaten the livelihoods of farmers and ranchers. The investigation of U.S. Wildlife Services is to determine, among other things, "whether wildlife damage management activities were justified and effective. " Biologists have questioned the agency's effectiveness, arguing that indiscriminately killing more than 3 million birds and other wild animals every year is often counterproductive.
NEWS
January 19, 2002
The Newport-Mesa Unified School District is accepting applications for vacancies on its 14-member Audit Committee. Members' duties include close interaction with district auditors throughout the annual auditing process, participation in preparing the audit report to the school board and evaluating the effectiveness of the audit process. The committee meets on the third Monday of every month for a minimum of six meetings a year. There are four vacancies on the committee.
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NEWS
From staff reports | February 28, 2014
Rutan & Tucker LLP has a new managing partner, Steve Nichols. Nichols joined what is now Orange County's largest full-service law firm in 1981. His specialties are in construction and business law as well as litigation, according to a news release from the Costa Mesa-based firm. Before becoming managing partner, he served on Rutan's executive committee for five years. * Growers Ranch to mark 45 years Growers Ranch , which sells fresh produce at 2016 Newport Blvd., plans to host a 45th anniversary celebration from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 22. The event will feature "giveaways, raffles, tastings" and "good 'ol fashion family fun," according to the store's website.
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NEWS
By Paloma Esquivel | January 30, 2014
Civic leaders in Irvine have authorized the use of subpoenas to help auditors delve deeper into an investigation of the financial management of the Orange County Great Park. The City Council voted 3-2 Tuesday to move forward with a forensic audit after a preliminary report raised questions about spending, contracts and oversight of the 1,300-park, which has been in the works for more than a decade. Council members Larry Agran and Beth Krom, who helped steward the project from its beginnings until they lost the council majority in the city's 2012 elections, denounced the  decision, which Krom called a “witch hunt.” Great Park: Where did all the money go?
NEWS
By Adolfo Flores and Samantha Schaefer | January 27, 2014
On the heels of preliminary  findings in an audit  of the Great Park that raised questions about the $200-million project's finances, Irvine may start issuing subpoenas to get some answers. The City Council is set to vote on a resolution Tuesday that would allow its attorneys to subpoena people and documents to help auditors continue their review - at a cost of $400,000, according to the Los Angeles Times . During the course of their investigation, auditors said that they were “precluded from further analysis” and that several key players refused to speak with them.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 21, 2014
Board members and staff of the Costa Mesa Senior Center met Tuesday morning to formally discuss a recently released independent audit forecasting a "fiscal crisis" at the facility. After some 90 minutes of discussion, the board voted to formalize in writing the varied sentiment toward the audit's 15 recommendations. Some members were skeptical of the findings, alleging that the document's suggested changes for the senior center were already in place, such as regular auditing and direction for board members on the rules of the Brown Act, the state's open-meetings law. "Basically, this report is what the city wants," said Executive Director Aviva Goelman.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 7, 2014
It was a lavish evening at the posh Center Club, a Gatsby-themed affair 10 months in the making. The private, South Coast Metro venue was replete with flappers, generous silent-auction gift baskets, live music, a faux casino and hors d'oeuvres. Nearly 200 people attended the party last October, hoping it would be a much-needed fundraising boost for the Costa Mesa Senior Center. It wasn't. The party, the center's first fundraiser in eight years, cost nearly $45,000 and raised some $43,000 - a net loss of about $2,000.
NEWS
By Julie Cart | January 6, 2014
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's inspector general will investigate a federal agency whose mission is to exterminate birds, coyotes, mountain lions and other animals that threaten the livelihoods of farmers and ranchers. The investigation of U.S. Wildlife Services is to determine, among other things, "whether wildlife damage management activities were justified and effective. " Biologists have questioned the agency's effectiveness, arguing that indiscriminately killing more than 3 million birds and other wild animals every year is often counterproductive.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | June 6, 2013
The driver in a Memorial Day crash that killed five teens had an expired interim provisional license, according to a DMV audit. That provisional license was the second the Department of Motor Vehicles had issued to Abdulrahman Alyahyan, 17, of Irvine, whose 2008 Infiniti crashed into a tree on Jamboree Road in Newport Beach. Previous reports had a discrepancy between a ticket Irvine police issued to the teen that listed a driver's license number and DMV representatives saying there was no record of him having a learner's permit or license.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
The Department of Motor Vehicles will audit an application for a driver's license filed by the teenage driver who was behind the wheel when a carload of teenagers crashed into a tree in Newport Beach, a spokesman said Thursday. Abdulrahman Alyahyan, 17, of Irvine, did not have even a learner's permit when his Infiniti sedan crashed on Jamboree Road Monday. The wreck killed him and four passengers. However, he was cited April 20 for violating terms of a provisional license. Those violations included illegal modifications to his car. The department was "following the trail of his application after he initially came in to apply," said DMV spokesman Armando Botello.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | May 21, 2013
The Costa Mesa Sanitary District's contract for solid waste and recycling services is acceptable, but there is room for improvement, particularly when it comes to rates, according to an independent audit presented Tuesday to the district's board. Michael Balliet Consulting's 57-page review specifically addressed the Sanitary District's fiscal year 2011-12 agreement with CR&R Environmental Services, a Stanton-based company that has had a long-standing contract with the district. The document said it was "unclear" whether CR&R, which earned about $4.45 million from ratepayers that fiscal year, was charging a "reasonable" amount compared with other cities' trash-collection rates.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | May 9, 2013
State legislators may soon be asked to referee the ongoing scuffle between the city of Newport Beach and residential dock owners. Opponents of the dock fee increases are calling for a review of the way the city spends revenues generated in its management of public tidelands. They want a review by the Joint Legislative Audit Committee, which investigates policy, finances and other matters and then passes recommendations on to the Legislature. Assemblyman Allan Mansoor (R-Costa Mesa)
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